Loading content, please wait..
loading..
Logo
Version 3.24
or
Authors Sullivan, CR; Smyth, AR; Martin, CW; Reynolds, LK
Author Full Name Sullivan, Cayla R.; Smyth, Ashley R.; Martin, Charles W.; Reynolds, Laura K.
Title How Does Mangrove Expansion Affect Structure and Function of Adjacent Seagrass Meadows?
Source ESTUARIES AND COASTS
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Thalassia testudinum; Salt marshes; Habitat connectivity; Outwelling; Tropicalization; Denitrification
Abstract Temperatures are increasing globally and causing species-specific geographic range expansions. In the Gulf of Mexico, mangroves are encroaching regions historically dominated by temperate salt marshes, changing animal communities and nutrient cycling in the intertidal zone. Marine systems are highly connected; therefore, we expect that changes in the intertidal will alter functions of adjacent subtidal seagrass meadows. We surveyed seagrass meadows adjacent to mangroves, salt marshes, and a mixture of the two and asked, do changes in intertidal plant composition influence (1) environmental conditions (subtidal water and sediment characteristics); (2) biogeochemical cycling (net oxygen and nitrogen gas fluxes); (3) seagrass meadow cover, biomass, and productivity; and (4) invertebrate community assemblage? There are clear differences in sediment organic matter and net nitrogen gas (N-2) fluxes between adjacent intertidal habitats, but the magnitude or direction of change differs seasonally. We hypothesize that this seasonal pattern is due to outwelling from the intertidal, as mangroves senesce in fall, and marshes senesce later in winter. Therefore, changes in adjacent intertidal habitat can impact the timing of organic matter delivery. This also has implications for seagrass biomass. Thalassia testudinum belowground biomass adjacent to mangroves substantially decreased over the winter, suggesting vulnerability to stressors as the intertidal plant community shifts from marsh to mangrove dominance. Epifauna density and diversity did not vary among seagrass meadows based on adjacent intertidal habitats, but subtle differences in community assemblages associated with shifts in intertidal plant community were detected. This work demonstrates that impacts of species range expansions are far-reaching due to connectivity in marine systems.
Author Address [Sullivan, Cayla R.; Smyth, Ashley R.; Reynolds, Laura K.] Univ Florida, Soil & Water Sci Dept, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA; [Smyth, Ashley R.] Univ Florida, Ctr Trop Res & Educ, Homestead, FL 33031 USA; [Martin, Charles W.] Univ Florida, Nat Coast Biol Stn, Cedar Key, FL USA
Reprint Address Sullivan, CR; Reynolds, LK (corresponding author), Univ Florida, Soil & Water Sci Dept, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA.
E-mail Address caylarsullivan@gmail.com; lkreynolds@ufl.edu
ORCID Number Martin, Charles/0000-0001-9240-3824; Sullivan, Cayla/0000-0002-2056-3623
Funding Agency and Grant Number University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural SciencesUniversity of Florida [FLA-SWS-005656]
Funding Text This work was funded by University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (FLA-SWS-005656).
Publisher SPRINGER
Publisher City NEW YORK
Publisher Address ONE NEW YORK PLAZA, SUITE 4600, NEW YORK, NY, UNITED STATES
ISSN 1559-2723
29-Character Source Abbreviation ESTUAR COAST
ISO Source Abbreviation Estuaries Coasts
Publication Date MAR
Year Published 2021
Volume 44
Issue 2
Special Issue SI
Beginning Page 453
Ending Page 467
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1007/s12237-020-00879-x
Page Count 15
Web of Science Category Environmental Sciences; Marine & Freshwater Biology
Subject Category Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Marine & Freshwater Biology
Document Delivery Number PX7PE
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000607761000002
Plants associated with this reference

LEGAL NOTICES — This website is protected by Copyright © The University of Sussex, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022. The eHALOPH database is protected by Database Right and Copyright © The University of Sussex and other contributors, 2006, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022. This database is based on an earlier work by James Aronson.
THIS WEBSITE AND THIS DATABASE ARE PROVIDED ON AN "AS IS" BASIS, AND YOU USE THEM AND RELY ON THEM AT YOUR OWN RISK.

Contact email: halophytes@sussex.ac.uk
Credits – Tim Flowers, Joaquim Santos, Moritz Jahns, Brian Warburton, Peter Reed