Loading content, please wait..
loading..
Logo
Version 3.24
or
Authors Pezeshki, SR; DeLaune, RD
Author Full Name Pezeshki, SR; DeLaune, RD
Title Population differentiation in Spartina patens: Responses of photosynthesis and biomass partitioning to elevated salinity
Source BOTANICAL BULLETIN OF ACADEMIA SINICA
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords marsh restoration; marsh vegetation; photosynthesis; population differentiation; salinity stress
Keywords Plus ADAPTATION; SELECTION; TOLERANCE; VARIANCE; PLANTS; GROWTH
Abstract Populations of Spartina patens (Ait) Muhl. were collected from three distinct habitats in Louisiana Gulf Coast marshes. The Lake Tambour and Ferblanc populations are associated with saltmarsh and saltmarsh-brackish marsh interface, respectively, where soil salinity is greater than at the brackish-freshwater transition zone where the Clovelly population occurs. The effects of salinity at 0, 5, and 15 ppt on gas exchange, growth and biomass partitioning were evaluated. All study populations performed well under the elevated salinities for 12 weeks (the duration of the study). However, differences in gas exchange, growth, biomass production, and patterns of biomass partitioning in response to the treatments were evident among the populations. For example, in the Lake Tambour population, there was no significant change in leaf conductance or net photosynthesis in response to the elevated salinities whereas, in others, significant reductions in net photosynthesis were found at the 15 ppt treatment. Generally, all populations had comparable gas exchange rates under control (0 ppt) treatment. However, the Clovelly and Lake Tambour populations exhibited significantly (p < 0.05) greater net photosynthesis compared to the Ferblanc population under the 5 ppt salinity treatment. In 5 and 15 ppt treatments, the Lake Tambour population maintained the greatest number of shoots, leaf area, and dry weight among the study populations. The population-by-treatment interaction was significant for all size-related traits except the gas exchange properties. Although certain measured parameters appeared to reflect the relative position of these populations in the natural range of S. patens, based on the present data salt-tolerance in this species can not generally be inferred from the field position. In addition, the within- and between-population variation in the characteristics studied suggest that collection of germplasm from a wide range of sites is needed to increase the likelihood of capturing the maximum salinity tolerance. Thus finding the greatest level of salt-tolerance among the population of this and other important coastal macrophyte species remains as a major task.
Author Address LOUISIANA STATE UNIV,WETLAND BIOGEOCHEM INST,BATON ROUGE,LA 70803
Reprint Address Pezeshki, SR (corresponding author), UNIV MEMPHIS,DEPT BIOL,DIV ECOL & ORGANISMAL BIOL,MEMPHIS,TN 38152, USA.
ResearcherID Number DeLaune, R.D./A-2058-2012
Times Cited 2
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 2
Publisher ACAD SINICA INST BOTANY
Publisher City TAIPEI
Publisher Address NANKANG, TAIPEI 11529, TAIWAN
ISSN 0006-8063
29-Character Source Abbreviation BOT BULL ACAD SINICA
ISO Source Abbreviation Bot. Bul. Acad. Sin.
Publication Date APR
Year Published 1997
Volume 38
Issue 2
Beginning Page 115
Ending Page 120
Page Count 6
Web of Science Category Plant Sciences
Subject Category Plant Sciences
Document Delivery Number WY458
Unique Article Identifier WOS:A1997WY45800008
Plants associated with this reference

LEGAL NOTICES — This website is protected by Copyright © The University of Sussex, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022. The eHALOPH database is protected by Database Right and Copyright © The University of Sussex and other contributors, 2006, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022. This database is based on an earlier work by James Aronson.
THIS WEBSITE AND THIS DATABASE ARE PROVIDED ON AN "AS IS" BASIS, AND YOU USE THEM AND RELY ON THEM AT YOUR OWN RISK.

Contact email: halophytes@sussex.ac.uk
Credits – Tim Flowers, Joaquim Santos, Moritz Jahns, Brian Warburton, Peter Reed