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Authors Otte, ML; Wilson, G; Morris, JT; Moran, BM
Author Full Name Otte, ML; Wilson, G; Morris, JT; Moran, BM
Title Dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) and related compounds in higher plants
Source JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BOTANY
Language English
Document Type Article; Proceedings Paper
Conference Title Annual Meeting of the Society-for-Experimental-Biology
Conference Date MAR 29-APR 02, 2004
Conference Location Edinburgh, SCOTLAND
Conference Sponsors Soc Experimental Bio
Author Keywords dimethylsulphoniopropionate; Spartina sp.; tissue culture; Wollastonia biflora
Keywords Plus DIMETHYL-BETA-PROPIOTHETIN; SPARTINA-ALTERNIFLORA LOISEL; S-METHYLMETHIONINE; GLYCINE BETAINE; ORGANIC SOLUTES; DIMETHYLSULFONIOPROPIONATE; NITROGEN; SALINITY; SULFIDE; 3-DIMETHYLSULFONIOPROPIONATE
Abstract Dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) is produced in high concentrations in many marine algae, but in higher plants only in a few salt marsh grasses of the genus Spartina, in sugar canes (Saccharum spp.), and in the Pacific strand plant Wollastonia biflora (L.) DC. The high concentrations found in higher plants (up to 250 mumol g(-1) dry weight) suggest an important role, but though many functions have been suggested (including methylating agent, detoxification of excess sulphur, salt tolerance, and herbivore deterrent), its actual functions remain unclear. The fact that the ability to produce DMSP in high concentrations is found in species that have no taxonomic or ecological relationship suggests that the compound evolved independently and serves different functions in different plants. This is supported by observations that DMSP in W. biflora behaves differently from that in Spartina species. While DMSP concentrations in W. biflora have been found to increase with increasing salinity, suggesting a role in osmotic control, such a relationship has not been found for DMSP in Spartina species. Recent observations on tissue culture showed that, while undifferentiated tissue of W. biflora produced DMSP, such material of Spartina alterniflora Loisel. did not. Ongoing studies with tissue culture of both species have opened up new avenues of research on DMSP in higher plants, ultimately to elucidate the functions of this enigmatic compound.
Author Address Natl Univ Ireland Univ Coll Dublin, Dept Bot, Wetland Ecol Res Grp, Dublin 4, Ireland; Univ S Carolina, Dept Biol Sci, Columbia, SC 29208 USA
Reprint Address Otte, ML (corresponding author), Natl Univ Ireland Univ Coll Dublin, Dept Bot, Wetland Ecol Res Grp, Dublin 4, Ireland.
E-mail Address marinus.otte@ucd.ie
ResearcherID Number morris, james/ABC-8111-2020
Times Cited 70
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 77
Publisher OXFORD UNIV PRESS
Publisher City OXFORD
Publisher Address GREAT CLARENDON ST, OXFORD OX2 6DP, ENGLAND
ISSN 0022-0957
29-Character Source Abbreviation J EXP BOT
ISO Source Abbreviation J. Exp. Bot.
Publication Date AUG
Year Published 2004
Volume 55
Issue 404
Beginning Page 1919
Ending Page 1925
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1093/jxb/erh178
Page Count 7
Web of Science Category Plant Sciences
Subject Category Plant Sciences
Document Delivery Number 850CS
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000223589400016
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