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Authors Feng, X; Xu, SH; Li, JF; Yang, YC; Chen, QP; Lyu, HM; Zhong, CR; He, ZW; Shi, SH
Author Full Name Feng Xiao; Xu Shaohua; Li Jianfang; Yang Yuchen; Chen Qipian; Lyu Haomin; Zhong Cairong; He Ziwen; Shi Suhua
Title Molecular adaptation to salinity fluctuation in tropical intertidal environments of a mangrove tree Sonneratia alba
Source BMC PLANT BIOLOGY
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Homeostasis; Mangrove; Salt adaptation; Sonneratia alba; Transcription factor; Transcriptome profiles
Keywords Plus WRKY TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS; SALT TOLERANCE; ANALYSIS REVEALS; ABSCISIC-ACID; STRESS; GENOME; GENE; EXPRESSION; RESPONSES; DROUGHT
Abstract Background Mangroves have adapted to intertidal zones - the interface between terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Various studies have shown adaptive evolution in mangroves at physiological, ecological, and genomic levels. However, these studies paid little attention to gene regulation of salt adaptation by transcriptome profiles. Results We sequenced the transcriptomes of Sonneratia alba under low (fresh water), medium (half the seawater salinity), and high salt (seawater salinity) conditions and investigated the underlying transcriptional regulation of salt adaptation. In leaf tissue, 64% potential salinity-related genes were not differentially expressed when salinity increased from freshwater to medium levels, but became up- or down-regulated when salt concentrations further increased to levels found in sea water, indicating that these genes are well adapted to the medium saline condition. We inferred that both maintenance and regulation of cellular environmental homeostasis are important adaptive processes in S. alba. i) The sulfur metabolism as well as flavone and flavonol biosynthesis KEGG pathways were significantly enriched among up-regulated genes in leaves. They are both involved in scavenging ROS or synthesis and accumulation of osmosis-related metabolites in plants. ii) There was a significantly increased percentage of transcription factor-encoding genes among up-regulated transcripts. High expressions of salt tolerance-related TF families were found under high salt conditions. iii) Some genes up-regulated in response to salt treatment showed signs of adaptive evolution at the amino acid level and might contribute to adaptation to fluctuating intertidal environments. Conclusions This study first elucidates the mechanism of high-salt adaptation in mangroves at the whole-transcriptome level by salt gradient experimental treatments. It reveals that several candidate genes (including salt-related genes, TF-encoding genes, and PSGs) and major pathways are involved in adaptation to high-salt environments. Our study also provides a valuable resource for future investigation of adaptive evolution in extreme environments.
Author Address [Feng Xiao; Xu Shaohua; Li Jianfang; Yang Yuchen; Chen Qipian; Lyu Haomin; He Ziwen; Shi Suhua] Sun Yat Sen Univ, Guangdong Key Lab Plant Resources, Key Lab Biodivers Dynam & Conservat Guangdong Hig, State Key Lab Biocontrol,Sch Life Sci, Guangzhou, Peoples R China; [Zhong Cairong] Hainan Dongzhai Harbor Natl Nat Reserve Adm, Haikou, Hainan, Peoples R China
Reprint Address He, ZW; Shi, SH (corresponding author), Sun Yat Sen Univ, Guangdong Key Lab Plant Resources, Key Lab Biodivers Dynam & Conservat Guangdong Hig, State Key Lab Biocontrol,Sch Life Sci, Guangzhou, Peoples R China.
E-mail Address heziwen@mail.sysu.edu.cn; lssssh@mail.sysu.edu.cn
Funding Agency and Grant Number National Natural Science Foundation of ChinaNational Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) [31830005, 31971540]; National Key Research and Development Plan [2017FY100705]; Guangdong Basic and Applied Basic Research Foundation [2019A1515010752]; China Postdoctoral Science FoundationChina Postdoctoral Science Foundation [BX201700300, 2017 M622857]; Chang Hungta Science Foundation of Sun Yat-sen University
Funding Text This study was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31830005 and 31971540); the National Key Research and Development Plan (2017FY100705); Guangdong Basic and Applied Basic Research Foundation (2019A1515010752); the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (BX201700300 and 2017 M622857); and the Chang Hungta Science Foundation of Sun Yat-sen University. The funding bodies did not involve in the design of the study and collection, analysis, interpretation of data, or writing of the manuscript.
Publisher BMC
Publisher City LONDON
Publisher Address CAMPUS, 4 CRINAN ST, LONDON N1 9XW, ENGLAND
ISSN 1471-2229
29-Character Source Abbreviation BMC PLANT BIOL
ISO Source Abbreviation BMC Plant Biol.
Publication Date APR 22
Year Published 2020
Volume 20
Issue 1
Article Number 178
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1186/s12870-020-02395-3
Page Count 14
Web of Science Category Plant Sciences
Subject Category Plant Sciences
Document Delivery Number LJ4OJ
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000530145300002
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