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Authors Colla, G; Rouphael, Y; Fallovo, C; Cardarelli, M; Graifenberg, A
Author Full Name Colla, G.; Rouphael, Y.; Fallovo, C.; Cardarelli, M.; Graifenberg, A.
Title Use of Salsola soda as a companion plant to improve greenhouse pepper (Capsicum annuum) performance under saline conditions
Source NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF CROP AND HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Capsicum annuum; companion plant; mineral composition; salinity; Salsola soda
Keywords Plus SALT TOLERANCE; CROP; CONDUCTIVITY; RESPONSES; YIELD
Abstract A greenhouse experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of Salsola soda used as a desalinating companion plant on growth, yield, mineral composition, and fruit quality of pepper (Capsicum annuum) grown under moderate (electrical conductivity (EC) = 4.0 dS m(-1)) and high salt concentration (EC = 7.8 dS ml(-1)). The presence of S. soda decreased the EC of the medium by 45% and increased the total yield, marketable yield, and total biomass of pepper by 26%, 32%, and 22% respectively, in comparison with those grown without S. soda. The increase in marketable yield under moderate salt stress with S. soda was the result of a higher fruit mean weight and not the number of fruit. S. soda did not prevent suppression of growth and yield on pepper under severe salt conditions. Increasing the nutrient solution salinity improved fruit quality by increasing dry matter (DM) and total soluble solid (TSS) content. Under moderate saline conditions, the concentrations of sodium (Na) and chloride (Cl-) in pepper leaves were lower when S. soda was used as a companion plant, whereas no difference was recorded on Na and Cl concentrations of leaves at 7.8 dS m(-1). A higher concentration of nitrogen (N), potassium (K), and calcium (Ca) was observed in pepper leaves in the presence of the companion plant at 4.0 dS m(-1). The results demonstrate that using S. soda as a companion plant under moderate saline concentrations would be an attractive strategy in limiting yield reduction.
Author Address Univ Tuscia, Dipartimento Prod Vegetale, I-01100 Viterbo, Italy; Univ Pisa, Dipartimento Biol Piante Agr, I-56120 Pisa, Italy
Reprint Address Colla, G (corresponding author), Univ Tuscia, Dipartimento Prod Vegetale, I-01100 Viterbo, Italy.
E-mail Address giucolla@unitus.it
ORCID Number Colla, Giuseppe/0000-0002-3399-3622; Rouphael, Youssef/0000-0002-1002-8651; Cardarelli, Mariateresa/0000-0002-9865-3821
Times Cited 17
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 18
Publisher TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD
Publisher City ABINGDON
Publisher Address 2-4 PARK SQUARE, MILTON PARK, ABINGDON OR14 4RN, OXON, ENGLAND
ISSN 0114-0671
29-Character Source Abbreviation NEW ZEAL J CROP HORT
ISO Source Abbreviation N. Z. J. Crop Hortic. Sci.
Publication Date DEC
Year Published 2006
Volume 34
Issue 4
Beginning Page 283
Ending Page 290
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1080/01140671.2006.9514418
Page Count 8
Web of Science Category Agronomy; Horticulture
Subject Category Agriculture
Document Delivery Number 132MS
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000243947500001
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