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Authors Idris, OA; Wintola, OA; Afolayan, AJ
Author Full Name Idris, Oladayo Amed; Wintola, Olubunmi Abosede; Afolayan, Anthony Jide
Title Evaluation of the Bioactivities of Rumex crispus L. Leaves and Root Extracts Using Toxicity, Antimicrobial, and Antiparasitic Assays
Source EVIDENCE-BASED COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Language English
Document Type Article
Keywords Plus EASTERN CAPE PROVINCE; ARTEMIA-SALINA L.; MEDICINAL-PLANTS; IN-VITRO; GASTROINTESTINAL HELMINTHS; ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY; INDIGENOUS PLANTS; ANTIOXIDANT; RESISTANCE; INVENTORY
Abstract Traditional folks in different parts of the world use Rumex crispus L. for the treatment of microbial infections, malaria, and sleeping sickness in the form of decoction or tincture. In the search for a natural alternative remedy, this study aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial, antitrypanosomal, and antiplasmodial efficacy and the toxicity of R. crispus extracts. Antimicrobial potency of the extracts was evaluated using the agar dilution method to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The antitrypanosomal activity of the extracts was evaluated with the Trypanosoma brucei brucei model while the antimalaria potency was tested using Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 strain. Toxicity was then tested with brine shrimp assay and cytotoxicity (HeLa cells). The acetone extract of the root (RT-ACE) reveals the highest antimicrobial potency with the lowest MIC value of <1.562mg/mL for all bacteria strains and also showed high potent against fungi. RT-ACE (IC50: 13 mu g/mL) and methanol extract of the leaf (LF-MEE; IC50: 15 mu g/mL) show a strong inhibition of P. falciparum. The ethanol extract of the root (RT-ETE: IC50: 9.7 mu g/mL) reveals the highest inhibition of T.b. brucei parasite. RT-ETE and RT-ACE were found to have the highest toxicity in brine shrimp lethality assay (BSLA) and cytotoxicity which correlates in the two assays. This research revealed Rumex crispus has potency against microorganisms, Trypanosoma, and Plasmodium and could be a potential source for the treatment of these diseases.
Author Address [Idris, Oladayo Amed; Wintola, Olubunmi Abosede; Afolayan, Anthony Jide] Univ Ft Hare, Med Plants & Econ Dev MPED Res Ctr, Dept Bot, ZA-5700 Alice, South Africa
Reprint Address Wintola, OA (corresponding author), Univ Ft Hare, Med Plants & Econ Dev MPED Res Ctr, Dept Bot, ZA-5700 Alice, South Africa.
E-mail Address owintola@ufh.ac.za
ResearcherID Number Idris, Oladayo/W-1612-2019
ORCID Number Idris, Oladayo/0000-0002-8053-4824; Wintola, Olubunmi/0000-0002-0246-0030
Times Cited 6
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 6
Publisher HINDAWI LTD
Publisher City LONDON
Publisher Address ADAM HOUSE, 3RD FLR, 1 FITZROY SQ, LONDON, W1T 5HF, ENGLAND
ISSN 1741-427X
29-Character Source Abbreviation EVID-BASED COMPL ALT
ISO Source Abbreviation Evid.-based Complement Altern. Med.
Publication Date OCT 30
Year Published 2019
Volume 2019
Article Number 6825297
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1155/2019/6825297
Page Count 13
Web of Science Category Integrative & Complementary Medicine
Subject Category Integrative & Complementary Medicine
Document Delivery Number JO1ML
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000497349000002
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