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Authors Ikegami, M; van Hal, S; van Rheenen, JWA; Whigham, DF; Werger, MJA
Author Full Name Ikegami, Makihiko; van Hal, Sander; van Rheenen, Jan W. A.; Whigham, Dennis F.; Werger, Marinus J. A.
Title Spatial division of labour of Schoenoplectus americanus
Source PLANT ECOLOGY
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords clonal plant; division of labour; heterogeneous environments; Schoenoplectus americanus
Keywords Plus WATER RELATIONS; SALT-MARSH; PLANT; PLASTICITY; GROWTH; TRANSLOCATION; HABITATS
Abstract If connected ramets are growing in heterogeneous environments, Division of Labour (DoL) among ramets potentially will result in more efficient sharing of resources and an overall benefit to the plants. As a result of DoL, connected ramets growing in a heterogeneous environment might achieve more biomass than ramets growing in a homogeneous environment. DoL has been demonstrated to occur in a few clonal plant species, although most studies simply focussed on biomass allocation, not on actual resource capturing such as water and nutrient consumption. The model system for our study is one in which two connected ramet groups of Schoenoplectus americanus were placed into contrasting environments. In one treatment, the connected ramets grew in heterogeneous environments and in the other treatment, the connected ramets grew in the same (i.e. homogeneous) environment. We manipulated two variables (light and salinity) in the experiment. We hypothesized that ramets growing in a shaded and fresh water condition in a heterogeneous environment would use more water than ramets growing in a similar condition but in a homogeneous environment. We further hypothesized that ramets growing in a light and saline condition in a heterogeneous environment would assimilate less water than ramets growing in a similar condition but in a homogeneous environment. These hypotheses are based on the assumption that ramets in a heterogeneous environment would translocate water from ramets growing in a shaded and fresh water condition to ramets growing in a light and saline water condition. We also hypothesized that ramets growing in heterogeneous environments achieve larger biomass than ramets in homogeneous environments. Ramets grown in light and saline conditions in heterogeneous environments allocated more biomass to aboveground parts, had taller shoots, larger Specific Green (leaf) Area and consumed less water than ramets grown in similar conditions but in a homogeneous environment. Results confirm the hypothesis that connected ramets in heterogeneous environments are specialised to capture locally abundant resources and share these with connected ramets growing in other habitats. The result of DoL is that the entire connected ramet system benefits and achieves higher biomass.
Author Address [Ikegami, Makihiko] Alice Holt Lodge, Forest Res, Farnham GU10 4LH, Surrey, England; [Ikegami, Makihiko; van Hal, Sander; van Rheenen, Jan W. A.; Werger, Marinus J. A.] Univ Utrecht, Dept Plant Ecol & Biodivers, NL-3508 TB Utrecht, Netherlands; SERC, Edgewater, MD 21037 USA
Reprint Address Ikegami, M (corresponding author), Alice Holt Lodge, Forest Res, Farnham GU10 4LH, Surrey, England.
E-mail Address makihiko@mbox.kyoto-inet.or.jp
ResearcherID Number IKEGAMI, Makihiko/E-6612-2012
ORCID Number IKEGAMI, Makihiko/0000-0002-7760-7973; Whigham, Dennis/0000-0003-1488-820X
Funding Agency and Grant Number Smithsonian InstitutionSmithsonian Institution; Faculty of Biology at Utrecht University
Funding Text This study was financially supported by a grant to MJAW from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation through the Smithsonian Institution and by the Faculty of Biology at Utrecht University. We also thank two anonymous reviewers for their comments that have improved this manuscript.
Times Cited 7
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 9
Publisher SPRINGER
Publisher City DORDRECHT
Publisher Address VAN GODEWIJCKSTRAAT 30, 3311 GZ DORDRECHT, NETHERLANDS
ISSN 1385-0237
29-Character Source Abbreviation PLANT ECOL
ISO Source Abbreviation Plant Ecol.
Publication Date NOV
Year Published 2008
Volume 199
Issue 1
Beginning Page 55
Ending Page 64
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1007/s11258-008-9411-4
Page Count 10
Web of Science Category Plant Sciences; Ecology; Forestry
Subject Category Plant Sciences; Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Forestry
Document Delivery Number 352GI
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000259483700006
Plants associated with this reference

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