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Authors Pratt-Zossoungbo, M; Biber, PD
Editors Edelstein, A; Bar, D
Author Full Name Pratt-Zossoungbo, Melissa; Biber, Patrick D.
Title MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI ASSOCIATIONS WITH FOUR SALT MARSH SPECIES
Source HANDBOOK OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH
Series Environmental Research Advances
Language English
Document Type Article; Book Chapter
Author Keywords Mycorrhizae; Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizae (VAM); Juncus roemerianus; Spartina alterniflora; Schoenoplectus spp.
Keywords Plus VESICULAR-ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAE; ECOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE; SALINE SOILS; FATTY-ACIDS; PLANTS; GROWTH; TRANSPORT; WATER; COLONIZATION; NITROGEN
Abstract The value of salt marshes in reducing wave energy, enhancing sedimentation, stabilizing sediment, providing fisheries habitat, and serving as a food source for wildlife is well documented and widely recognized. Restoration efforts often consist of whole plant harvesting from natural habitats. This imposes strong disturbances to the harvested areas, as well as plant availability being limited to the growing season. Development and evaluation of ecologically sound and cost-effective restoration methods using nursery-grown marsh grasses will advance the current state of restoration science and improve restoration effectiveness in estuarine and coastal habitats. The introduction of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi may have the potential to increase nursery production and the health of the plants produced. VAM colonization may increase plant growth, improve water transport, increase resistance to pathogens, and mediate transplant shock of saltmarsh plants. VAM are also associated with enhanced plant survival in stressful environments including: water-stress, salinity stress, and low nutrient availability. Saltmarsh species Juncus roemerianus, Spartina alterniflora, Schoenoplectus robustus, and Schoenoplectus americanus plants of various ages were inoculated with commercial mycorrhizal inoculant. Colonization rates were monitored and plant growth and health were assessed by morphological measurements. The effect of inoculant on morphological changes was also compared with the effects that the addition of fertilizer, and less saturated soil conditions had on plant growth and health. These studies showed that species Juncus roemerianus and Schoenoplectus spp. are capable of acquiring VAM colonization, while Spartina alterniflora did not become colonized in mature or seedling stages. The effects of VAM on plant morphology varied between species and by the age of the plants and inoculation generally only had a measurable effect in seedlings. Inoculation had significant effects on plant growth for Schoenoplectus spp., while the addition of fertilizer had more pronounced effects on growth for Juncus roemerianus and Spartina alterniflora.
Author Address Univ So Mississippi, Dept Coastal Sci, Gulf Coast Res Lab, Ocean Springs, MS USA
Reprint Address Pratt-Zossoungbo, M (corresponding author), NOAA, Natl Ocean Serv Policy, Off Management & Budget, 1305 East West Hwy,Rm 13349, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA.
E-mail Address melissa.pratt-zossoungbo@noaa.gov; Patrick.biber@usm.edu
ORCID Number Biber, Patrick/0000-0002-6358-0976
Funding Agency and Grant Number EPAUnited States Environmental Protection Agency [R828677] Funding Source: Federal RePORTER
Publisher NOVA SCIENCE PUBLISHERS, INC
Publisher City HAUPPAUGE
Publisher Address 400 OSER AVE, STE 1600, HAUPPAUGE, NY 11788-3635 USA
ISBN 978-1-60741-492-6
29-Character Source Abbreviation ENVIRON RES ADV
Year Published 2010
Beginning Page 291
Ending Page 319
Page Count 29
Web of Science Category Environmental Sciences; Environmental Studies
Subject Category Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Document Delivery Number BPE23
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000278678600007
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