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Authors Hartmann, K; Stock, M
Author Full Name Hartmann, Karina; Stock, Martin
Title Long-term change in habitat and vegetation in an ungrazed, estuarine salt marsh: Man-made foreland compared to young marsh development
Source ESTUARINE COASTAL AND SHELF SCIENCE
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Salt marsh; Natural development; Geomorphology; Vegetation succession; Drainage system; Wadden sea
Keywords Plus WADDEN SEA; SCALE
Abstract Clay-rich salt marshes of mesotidal Wadden Sea coasts and of estuaries have been established mainly within artificial sedimentation fields in front of embankments. Natural salt marsh formation and natural range expansion outside artificial structures were rare. In the last three decades of this century natural marshes along the southern Wadden Sea coast of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, started to grow outside groyne fields and extended on tidal mudflats. This growth happened without direct human influence and naturally structured marshes of considerable spatial dimension evolved. Due to a spread in recent decades, natural grown marshes in our study area - southern Schleswig-Holstein Wadden Sea coast - are younger than man-made marshes. Vegetation developed rapidly in response to fine-scaled geomorphological conditions. Meandering creeks and different surface elevation ranges of the developing natural salt marsh are special features. The naturally grown marshes show a high proportion of pioneer vegetation with Sparrina anglica and Salicornia europaea. Succession proceeds fast and elevated parts of the marsh were rapidly colonised with marsh vegetation of Puccinellia maritima and Aster tripoliwn in the lower marsh to late successional stages, like Halindone portulacoides and Elymus athericus, on the higher elevated parts. Strikingly, median elevations of the vegetation zones in the natural marsh were several centimetres lower than those of the man-made marsh. The largest difference between both marsh types was the characteristic and the extent of drainage systems. Naturally grown marshes have a natural developed, fine-branched and four times shorter drainage system than man-made marshes with a dense drainage structure.
Author Address [Hartmann, Karina; Stock, Martin] Natl Pk Author, Natl Pk & Marine Conservat, Schleswig Holstein Agcy Coastal Def, Schlossgarten 1, D-25832 Tonning, Germany
Reprint Address Hartmann, K (corresponding author), Natl Pk Author, Natl Pk & Marine Conservat, Schleswig Holstein Agcy Coastal Def, Schlossgarten 1, D-25832 Tonning, Germany.
E-mail Address karina.hartmann@piht.de; Martin.Stock@lkn.landsh.de
Times Cited 2
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 2
Publisher ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Publisher City LONDON
Publisher Address 24-28 OVAL RD, LONDON NW1 7DX, ENGLAND
ISSN 0272-7714
29-Character Source Abbreviation ESTUAR COAST SHELF S
ISO Source Abbreviation Estuar. Coast. Shelf Sci.
Publication Date OCT 31
Year Published 2019
Volume 227
Article Number 106348
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1016/j.ecss.2019.106348
Page Count 8
Web of Science Category Marine & Freshwater Biology; Oceanography
Subject Category Marine & Freshwater Biology; Oceanography
Document Delivery Number JC3PL
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000489190500034
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