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Publication Type J
Authors Khalmuratova, I., D. H. Choi, J. R. Woo, M. J. Jeong, Y. Oh, Y. G. Kim, I. J. Lee, Y. S. Choo and J. G. Kim
Title Diversity and Plant Growth-Promoting Effects of Fungal Endophytes Isolated from Salt-Tolerant Plants
Source Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
Author Keywords Halophytic plants endophytic fungi diversity salt marsh plant growth promotion gibberellins gibberellin production stress tolerance pure cultures strain roots trichoderma
Abstract Fungal endophytes are symbiotic microorganisms that are often found in asymptomatic plants. This study describes the genetic diversity of the fungal endophytes isolated from the roots of plants sampled from the west coast of Korea. Five halophytic plant species, Limonium tetragonum, Suaeda australis, Suaeda maritima, Suaeda glauca Bunge, and Phragmites australis, were collected from a salt marsh in Gochang and used to isolate and identify culturable, root-associated endophytic fungi. The fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 was used as the DNA barcode for the classification of these specimens. In total, 156 isolates of the fungal strains were identified and categorized into 23 genera and two phyla (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota), with Dothideomycetes and Sordariomycetes as the predominant classes. The genus Alternaria accounted for the largest number of strains, followed by Cladosporium and Fusarium. The highest diversity index was obtained from the endophytic fungal group associated with the plant P. australis. Waito-C rice seedlings were treated with the fungal culture filtrates to analyze their plant growth-promoting capacity. A bioassay of the Sm-3-7-5 fungal strain isolated from S. maritima confirmed that it had the highest plant growth-promoting capacity. Molecular identification of the Sm-3-7-5 strain revealed that it belongs to Alternaria alternata and is a producer of gibberellins. These findings provided a fundamental basis for understanding the symbiotic interactions between plants and fungi.
Author Address [Khalmuratova, Irina; Choi, Doo-Ho; Woo, Ju-Ri; Jeong, Min-Ji; Oh, Yoosun; Kim, Young-Guk; Kim, Jong-Guk] Kyungpook Natl Univ, Sch Life Sci & Biotechnol, Daegu 41566, South Korea. [Lee, In-Jung] Kyungpook Natl Univ, Sch Appl Biosci, Daegu 41566, South Korea. [Choo, Yeon-Sik] Kyungpook Natl Univ, Coll Natl Sci, Dept Biol, Daegu 41566, South Korea. Kim, JG (corresponding author), Kyungpook Natl Univ, Sch Life Sci & Biotechnol, Daegu 41566, South Korea. kimjg@knu.ac.kr
ISSN 1017-7825
ISBN 1017-7825
29-Character Source Abbreviation J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.
Publication Date Nov
Year Published 2020
Volume 30
Issue 11
Beginning Page 1680-1687
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.4014/jmb.2006.06050
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000595945600007
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