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Publication Type J
Authors Al-Shamsi, N., M. I. Hussain and A. El-Keblawy
Title Physiological responses of the xerohalophyte Suaeda vermiculata to salinity in its hyper-arid environment
Source Flora
Author Keywords ROS production Oxidative stress Antioxidant defense Leaf pigments Proline Macronutrients Plant biomass salt tolerance stress tolerance maternal salinity anabasis-setifera enzyme-activities oxidative stress defense system plants halophytes germination
Abstract Few plants can survive and grow equally well in salty and salt-free substrates (i.e., habitat-indifferent halophytes). Such plants provide a good opportunity to understand physiological and biochemical mechanisms underlying salinity tolerance. In this study, we investigated the environmental salinity impacts on several physiological and biochemical features of Suaeda vermiculata, a habitat-indifferent halophyte. Samples of different organs were collected from S. vermiculata from both a highly saline marsh habitat (HSMH) and non-salty gravel plain (NSGP) for the determination of the following physiological and bio-chemical features: chlorophyll and carotenoids, proline, malondialdehyde (MDA), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), antioxidant enzymes (Catalase, CAT; guaiacol peroxidase, GPX; Ascorbate peroxidase, APX) activities. Elemental compositions in soil and plant samples from both habitats were also assessed. Results showed that plants from HSMH had significantly lower values of chlorophyll a, b, carotenoids and leaf biomass, compared to those from NSGP. Roots from HSMH attained higher levels of antioxidant enzymes (CAT, GPX, APX) and lower values of reactive oxygen species (MDA and H2O2), indicating that the enzymes are more likely scavenging the reactive oxygen species (ROS). The enzyme activities and ROS levels were much lower in the shoots of both HSMH and NSGP than in roots. Accumulation of sodium was higher in leaves and shoots than roots of S. vermiculata. This study indicates that Suaeda vermiculata is a salt tolerant plant with adaptations to different environments through downregulation of different biochemical and physiological features to avoid oxidative stress.
Author Address [Al-Shamsi, Naeema] Univ Malaga, Dept Biol Vegetal, POB 59, Malaga 29080, Spain. [Al-Shamsi, Naeema] United Arab Emirates Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Biol, POB 17551, Al Ain, U Arab Emirates. [Hussain, M. Iftikhar] Univ Sharjah, Res Inst Sci & Engn RISE, POB 27272, Sharjah, U Arab Emirates. [Hussain, M. Iftikhar] Univ Vigo, Fac Biol, Dept Biol Vexetal & Ciencia Solo, Campus Lagoas Marcosende S-N, Vigo 36310, Spain. [El-Keblawy, Ali] Univ Sharjah, Fac Sci, Dept Appl Biol, POB 27272, Sharjah, U Arab Emirates. Hussain, MI (corresponding author), Univ Sharjah, Res Inst Sci & Engn RISE, POB 27272, Sharjah, U Arab Emirates.; Hussain, MI (corresponding author), Univ Vigo, Fac Biol, Dept Biol Vexetal & Ciencia Solo, Campus Lagoas Marcosende S-N, Vigo 36310, Spain. mih786@gmail.com
ISSN 0367-2530
ISBN 0367-2530
29-Character Source Abbreviation Flora
Publication Date Dec
Year Published 2020
Volume 273
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1016/j.flora.2020.151705
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000596940900003
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