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Authors Mishra, A; Sharma, SD
Author Full Name Mishra, A.; Sharma, S. D.
Title Influence of forest tree species on reclamation of semiarid sodic soils
Source SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Sodic soil; physico-chemical properties; afforestation; tree species; reclamation; infiltration rate
Keywords Plus NORTHERN INDIA; AMELIORATION; ROOTS
Abstract Tree plantation is a proven strategy to improve the salt-affected soils. However, the efficiency of trees to reclaim the soil varies from species to species. This study was therefore, carried out with the objective of assessing the efficiency of 3-yr old plantations of Prosopis juliflora (Swartz) D.C. (Mesquite), Eucalyptus tereticornis Sm. (Forest Red Gum) and Dalbergia sissoo Roxb. Ex. D.C. (Indian Rosewood) to improve the sodic soil characteristics in Sultanpur districts of Uttar Pradesh, India (26 degrees 10'-26 degrees 23'N, 81 degrees 50'-82 degrees 5'E). Soil samples collected from six depths; 0.0-0.1, 0.1-0.3, 0.3-0.6, 0.6-0.9, 0.9-1.2 and 1.2-1.5 m below the surface, were analysed for chemical and physical properties by following standard methods. The infiltration rate (IR) was determined by double concentric infiltrometer and the permeability by constant head permeameter. The trees were measured for their girth at breast height (at 1.33 m from ground) and crown area within a 100 x 100 m sector at each of the sites selected. There were decreases in soil pH (from 10.06 to 9.64) and exchangeable sodium percentage (from 70.6 to 26.9) at the P. juliflora plantation relative to the E. tereticornis and D. sissoo plantations. The organic carbon and nitrogen content increased from 2.0 and 0.18 g/kg to 3.9 and 0.45 g/kg under P. juliflora at the surface (0.0-0.1 m) layer. There was also more exchangeable Ca2+, Mg2+and K+ at exchange sites and a reduction in exchangeable Na+ 3 yr after establishing the plantations. There was a significant decrease in surface soil (0.1 m) bulk density from 1.66 to 1.37 (t/m3) but an increase in porosity from 41.2 to 46.3% and water holding capacity from 4.3 to 4.8 g/kg. The IR and soil permeability also increased after 3 yr of tree growth. Prosopis juliflora proved more effective than E. tereticornis and D. sissoo in its ability to enrich a sodic soil with organic matter and establishing better soil-water characteristics.
Author Address [Sharma, S. D.] Uttarakhand State Council Sci & Technol, Dehra Dun 248006, Uttarakhand, India; [Sharma, S. D.] Forest Res Inst, Bioinformat & GIS Div, Dehra Dun 248006, India
Reprint Address Mishra, A (corresponding author), Uttarakhand State Council Sci & Technol, 33 Vasant Vihar,Phase 1, Dehra Dun 248006, Uttarakhand, India.
E-mail Address mishraashu3@rediffmail.com
Times Cited 12
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 13
Publisher WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC
Publisher City MALDEN
Publisher Address COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA
ISSN 0266-0032
29-Character Source Abbreviation SOIL USE MANAGE
ISO Source Abbreviation Soil Use Manage.
Publication Date DEC
Year Published 2010
Volume 26
Issue 4
Beginning Page 445
Ending Page 454
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1111/j.1475-2743.2010.00296.x
Page Count 10
Web of Science Category Soil Science
Subject Category Agriculture
Document Delivery Number 684YU
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000284592000006
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