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Authors Rajpar, I; Lashari, MS; Brahman, SK; Ali, M; Shah, ZUH; Mangan, BN; Shah, AH
Author Full Name Rajpar, Inayatullah; Lashari, Muhammad Siddique; Brahman, Suneel Kumar; Ali, Muhram; Shah, Zia-Ul-Hassan; Mangan, Bakht Nisa; Shah, Ali Hyder
Title SALINITY AND DROUGHT STRESS TOLERANCE OF SOME PLANT SPECIES OF THAR DESERT, PAKISTAN: IMPLICATIONS IN BIO-SALINE AGRICULTURE
Source PAKISTAN JOURNAL OF BOTANY
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Salinity; Drought; Desert plant species; Stress tolerance and bio-saline agriculture
Keywords Plus BIOCHAR-MANURE COMPOST; PYROLIGNEOUS SOLUTION; CENTRAL CHINA; WATER-STRESS; SALT; SOIL; ACCUMULATION; CONJUNCTION; GROWTH; YIELD
Abstract Salinity and drought are twin menaces that have major influence on the sustainability of agriculture, especially in rain-fed areas of Pakistan. Therefore, to evaluate the influence of salinity and drought two pot studies were conducted to compare the salinity (study-1) and drought (study-2) stress tolerance of four common indigenous species of desert plants. The species included in both experiments were Prosopis cineraria (Kandi), Acacia senegal (Kumbhat), Salvadora oleoides (Jar) and Tecomela undulata (Rohera). Seeds of all four species were hydro-primed, placed on blotting paper and adjusted in Petri dishes, treated with 0, 0.25, 0.75 and 1.0 % NaCl solution and raised on full strength Hoagland solution. In second study, seeds were placed in plastic trays having 200g acid-washed river bed sand, supplied with Hoagland solution at 5, 8, 12, 16 and 20 % moisture level. Both the experiments were conducted under controlled conditions (25 +/- 2 degrees C temperature and 70 +/- 04% relative humidity) for six weeks. The results obtained from the study indicated that increasing salinity decreased various growth traits and biomass production of all four species. Both salinity and drought stresses enhanced leaf Na+ content in all four species, while the drought stress caused reduction in osmotic pressure and chlorophyll content in green leaves. Nonetheless, wide variation existed among species for their tolerance to salinity S. oleoides > P. cineraria. A. Senegal > T. undulata and drought stress as S. oleoides > T. undulate > P. cineraria > A. senegal. The study concluded that Jar possessed dual potential to tolerate harsh environment caused by salinity and drought, simultaneously and appeared to be the potential plant species for bio-saline agriculture.
Author Address [Rajpar, Inayatullah; Lashari, Muhammad Siddique; Brahman, Suneel Kumar; Shah, Zia-Ul-Hassan; Shah, Ali Hyder] Sindh Agr Univ, Dept Soil Sci, Ctr Biosaline Agr, Tandojam, Pakistan; [Ali, Muhram; Mangan, Bakht Nisa] Sindh Agr Univ, Dept Biotechnol & Agron, Fac Crop Prod, Tandojam, Pakistan; Nucl Inst Agr NIA, Soil Sci Div, Tandojam, Pakistan
Reprint Address Lashari, MS (corresponding author), Sindh Agr Univ, Dept Soil Sci, Ctr Biosaline Agr, Tandojam, Pakistan.
E-mail Address mslashari@gmail.com
Times Cited 1
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 1
Publisher PAKISTAN BOTANICAL SOC
Publisher City KARACHI
Publisher Address DEPT OF BOTANY UNIV KARACHI, 32 KARACHI, PAKISTAN
ISSN 0556-3321
29-Character Source Abbreviation PAK J BOT
ISO Source Abbreviation Pak. J. Bot.
Publication Date APR
Year Published 2018
Volume 50
Issue 2
Beginning Page 465
Ending Page 469
Page Count 5
Web of Science Category Plant Sciences
Subject Category Plant Sciences
Document Delivery Number GG0SB
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000432387800003
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