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Authors Sinclair, EA; Edgeloe, JM; Anthony, JM; Statton, J; Breed, MF; Kendrick, GA
Author Full Name Sinclair, Elizabeth A.; Edgeloe, Jane M.; Anthony, Janet M.; Statton, John; Breed, Martin F.; Kendrick, Gary A.
Title Variation in reproductive effort, genetic diversity and mating systems across Posidonia australis seagrass meadows in Western Australia
Source AOB PLANTS
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Environmental gradient; mating system; microsatellite DNA loci; monoecy; outcrossing rate; Posidonia australis; restoration; seed abortion
Keywords Plus POLLEN LIMITATION; CLIMATE-CHANGE; RANGE-EDGE; SHARK BAY; SEA-LEVEL; PLANT; HYBRIDIZATION; CONSEQUENCES; ECOSYSTEMS; DISPERSAL
Abstract Populations at the edges of their geographical range tend to have lower genetic diversity, smaller effective population sizes and limited connectivity relative to centre of range populations. Range edge populations are also likely to be better adapted to more extreme conditions for future survival and resilience in warming environments. However, they may also be most at risk of extinction from changing climate. We compare reproductive and genetic data of the temperate seagrass, Posidonia australis on the west coast of Australia. Measures of reproductive effort (flowering and fruit production and seed to ovule ratios) and estimates of genetic diversity and mating patterns (nuclear microsatellite DNA loci) were used to assess sexual reproduction in northern range edge (low latitude, elevated salinities, Shark Bay World Heritage Site) and centre of range (mid-latitude, oceanic salinity, Perth metropolitan waters) meadows in Western Australia. Flower and fruit production were highly variable among meadows and there was no significant relationship between seed to ovule ratio and clonal diversity. However, Shark Bay meadows were two orders of magnitude less fecund than those in Perth metropolitan waters. Shark Bay meadows were characterized by significantly lower levels of genetic diversity and a mixed mating system relative to meadows in Perth metropolitan waters, which had high genetic diversity and a completely outcrossed mating system. The combination of reproductive and genetic data showed overall lower sexual productivity in Shark Bay meadows relative to Perth metropolitan waters. The mixed mating system is likely driven by a combination of local environmental conditions and pollen limitation. These results indicate that seagrass restoration in Shark Bay may benefit from sourcing plant material from multiple reproductive meadows to increase outcrossed pollen availability and seed production for natural recruitment.
Author Address [Sinclair, Elizabeth A.; Edgeloe, Jane M.; Anthony, Janet M.; Statton, John; Kendrick, Gary A.] Univ Western Australia, Sch Biol Sci, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia; [Sinclair, Elizabeth A.; Statton, John; Kendrick, Gary A.] Univ Western Australia, Oceans Inst, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia; [Sinclair, Elizabeth A.; Anthony, Janet M.] Kings Pk Sci, Dept Biodivers Conservat & Attract, 1 Kattidj Close, Perth, WA 6005, Australia; [Breed, Martin F.] Flinders Univ S Australia, Coll Sci & Engn, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
Reprint Address Sinclair, EA (corresponding author), Univ Western Australia, Sch Biol Sci, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia.; Sinclair, EA (corresponding author), Univ Western Australia, Oceans Inst, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia.; Sinclair, EA (corresponding author), Kings Pk Sci, Dept Biodivers Conservat & Attract, 1 Kattidj Close, Perth, WA 6005, Australia.
E-mail Address esinclair@iinet.net.au
ResearcherID Number ; Breed, Martin/G-5482-2011
ORCID Number Sinclair, Elizabeth/0000-0002-5789-8945; Breed, Martin/0000-0001-7810-9696
Funding Agency and Grant Number Australian Research CouncilAustralian Research Council [LP130100918, LP160101011, DP180100668]; Friends of Kings Park Summer Scholarship
Funding Text This project was funded by the Australian Research Council (LP130100918 to G.A.K., LP160101011 to G.A.K., DP180100668 to G.A.K. and M.F.B.). J.M.E. was supported by a Friends of Kings Park Summer Scholarship.
Publisher OXFORD UNIV PRESS
Publisher City OXFORD
Publisher Address GREAT CLARENDON ST, OXFORD OX2 6DP, ENGLAND
ISSN 2041-2851
29-Character Source Abbreviation AOB PLANTS
ISO Source Abbreviation Aob Plants
Publication Date AUG 6
Year Published 2020
Volume 12
Issue 4
Article Number plaa038
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1093/aobpla/plaa038
Page Count 12
Web of Science Category Plant Sciences; Ecology
Subject Category Plant Sciences; Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Document Delivery Number NH2VC
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000564532200001
Plants associated with this reference

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