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Authors KUO, J; STEWART, JG
Author Full Name KUO, J; STEWART, JG
Title LEAF ANATOMY AND ULTRASTRUCTURE OF THE NORTH-AMERICAN MARINE ANGIOSPERM PHYLLOSPADIX (ZOSTERACEAE)
Source CANADIAN JOURNAL OF BOTANY-REVUE CANADIENNE DE BOTANIQUE
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords ANATOMY; ULTRASTRUCTURE; SEAGRASSES; PHYLLOSPADIX; NORTH AMERICA
Keywords Plus CAPENSIS SETCHELL; LEAVES; POTAMOGETONACEAE; SEAGRASSES; ASCHERS
Abstract The leaf anatomy and ultrastructure of the North American Phyllospadix species P. serrulatus Rupt. ex Aschers., P. scouleri Hook, and P. torreyi Watson are described. The unique anatomical and ultrastructural features of these species are compared with those of other seagrasses and their possible functional significance is discussed. All three species have ultrastructures similar to those in other members of the family Zosteracae. Subcuticular cavities, wall ingrowths, and numerous mitochondria and chloroplasts with well-developed grana are present in the blade epidermal cells and the adaxial sheath epidermal cells, indicating that these cells may play a major role in photosynthesis, osmoregulation, and absorption. Plasmodesmata are present occasionally between adjacent epidermal cells, and also between epidermal and mesophyll cells, suggesting that solutes can be transferred symplastically between these tissues. The vascular bundle sheath cells are not easy to recognize, as cell walls are thin and not suberized. The phloem contains both normal and nacreous-walled sieve tubes that may be functional. The walls of the phloem parenchyma cells facing nacreous-walled sieve tubes possess weak wall ingrowths, leading to speculation that these parenchyma cells may play an important role in solute translocation. The absence of suberin lamella in bundle sheath cells and the presence of a small xylem element in each vascular bundle suggest that the water flow in xylem elements in these seagrasses may be limited and that water is taken directly from the water column by leaf epidermal cells and is transported apoplastically along cell walls. The three North American Phyllospadix species can be separated by anatomical characters such as number of vascular bundles, the shape of epidermal cells in both transverse sectional and surface views, and the distribution of fibre bundles. It is proposed that P. serrulatus is taxonomically more closely related to the Japanese P. iwatensis Makino than to P. scouleri and P. torreyi and that there is no detectable hybrid species occurring between P. scouleri and P. torreyi.
Author Address UNIV CALIF SAN DIEGO,SCRIPPS INST OCEANOG,LA JOLLA,CA 92093
Reprint Address KUO, J (corresponding author), UNIV WESTERN AUSTRALIA,CTR MICROSCOPY & MICROANAL,NEDLANDS,WA 6907,AUSTRALIA.
Times Cited 4
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 6
Publisher NATL RESEARCH COUNCIL CANADA
Publisher City OTTAWA
Publisher Address RESEARCH JOURNALS, MONTREAL RD, OTTAWA ON K1A 0R6, CANADA
ISSN 0008-4026
29-Character Source Abbreviation CAN J BOT
ISO Source Abbreviation Can. J. Bot.-Rev. Can. Bot.
Publication Date JUN
Year Published 1995
Volume 73
Issue 6
Beginning Page 827
Ending Page 842
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1139/b95-091
Page Count 16
Web of Science Category Plant Sciences
Subject Category Plant Sciences
Document Delivery Number RF149
Unique Article Identifier WOS:A1995RF14900004
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