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Authors Chen, KM; Gong, HJ; Chen, GC; Wang, SM; Zhang, CL
Author Full Name Chen, KM; Gong, HJ; Chen, GC; Wang, SM; Zhang, CL
Title Up-regulation of glutathione metabolism and changes in redox status involved in adaptation of reed (Phragmites communis) ecotypes to drought-prone and saline habitats
Source JOURNAL OF PLANT PHYSIOLOGY
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords adaptation; drought and saline habitats; glutathione metabolisrn; reed (Phragmites communis) ecotypes; redox balance
Keywords Plus PENTOSE-PHOSPHATE PATHWAY; OXIDATIVE STRESS; HYDROGEN-PEROXIDE; ENZYMES; PLANTS; ANTIOXIDANT; PHOTOSYNTHESIS; PROTECTION; RESISTANCE; TRANSPORT
Abstract The glutathione (GSH) metabolic characteristics and redox balance in three ecotypes of reed (Phragmites communis), swamp reed (SR), dune reed (DR), and heavy salt meadow reed (HSMR), from different habitats in desert regions of northwest China were investigated. The DR possessed the highest rate of GSH biosynthesis and metabolism with the lowest levels of total and reduced GSH and its biosynthetic precursors, gamma-glutamylcysteine (gamma-EC) and cysteine (Cys), of the three reed ecotypes. This suggests that a higher rate of GSH biosynthesis and metabolism, but not GSH accumulation, might be involved in the adaptation of this terrestrial reed ecotype to its dry habitat. The HSMR shared this profile although it exhibited the highest reduced thiol levels of the three ecotypes. Two key enzymes in the Calvin-cycle possessing exposed sulfhydryl groups, NADP(+)-dependent glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PD) and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), and other two key enzymes in the pentose-phosphate pathway (PPP), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6-PGD), had very similar activities in the three reed ecotypes. Compared to the SR, the DR and HSMR had higher ratios of NADPH/NADP(+) and NADH/NAD(+), indicating that a more reduced redox status in the plant cells might be involved in the survival and adaptation of the two terrestrial reed ecotypes to long-term drought and salinity, respectively. These results suggest that changes of GSH metabolism and redox balance were important components of the adaptation of reed, a hydrophilic plant, to more extreme dune and saline habitats. The coordinated up-regulations of the rate of GSH biosynthesis and metabolism and reduction state of redox status of plant cells, conferred on the plant high resistance or tolerance to long-term drought and salinity.
Author Address Lanzhou Univ, Coll Life Sci, Lanzhou 730000, Peoples R China; Tianshui Normal Univ, Dept Biol, Tianshui 741000, Peoples R China
Reprint Address Zhang, CL (corresponding author), Lanzhou Univ, Coll Life Sci, Lanzhou 730000, Peoples R China.
ResearcherID Number Gong, Haijun/AAD-6731-2020
ORCID Number Gong, Haijun/0000-0001-8670-2959
Times Cited 25
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 29
Publisher URBAN & FISCHER VERLAG
Publisher City JENA
Publisher Address BRANCH OFFICE JENA, P O BOX 100537, D-07705 JENA, GERMANY
ISSN 0176-1617
29-Character Source Abbreviation J PLANT PHYSIOL
ISO Source Abbreviation J. Plant Physiol.
Publication Date MAR
Year Published 2003
Volume 160
Issue 3
Beginning Page 293
Ending Page 301
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1078/0176-1617-00927
Page Count 9
Web of Science Category Plant Sciences
Subject Category Plant Sciences
Document Delivery Number 664VY
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000182084900009
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