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Authors Israelsen, KR; Ransom, CV; Waldron, BL
Author Full Name Israelsen, Karl R.; Ransom, Corey V.; Waldron, Blair L.
Title Salinity Tolerance of Foxtail Barley (Hordeum jubatum) and Desirable Pasture Grasses
Source WEED SCIENCE
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Halophyte; electrical conductivity; grass mortality; growth rates
Keywords Plus SALT TOLERANCE; SEEDLING GROWTH; SOIL-SALINITY; MECHANISMS; PLANTS; GERMINATION; HALOPHYTES; WHEATGRASS; RESPONSES; SODIUM
Abstract Greenhouse studies were conducted to determine the relative salinity tolerance of foxtail barley and seven desirable pasture grasses. Grass species were reed canarygrass, timothy, altai wildrye, tall fescue, tall wheatgrass, orchardgrass, creeping meadow foxtail, and foxtail barley. Grasses were exposed to increasing electrical conductivity levels of NaCl and CaCl(2) salt solution over time. Grass species were compared using a cumulative value of salt exposure (EC(days)), which was calculated to account for the electrical conductivity (EC) and the time a plant was exposed at that level of conductivity. Salinity tolerance varied among grass species. Increasing EC significantly reduced plant biomass of all species. All grass species experienced a 50% biomass reduction (GR(50)) between 271 and 512 EC(days) in 2008 and between 297 and 575 EC(days) in 2009. Foxtail barley was among the most salt tolerant (GR(50) = 512 and 525 EC(days)), requiring the highest salt exposure in 2008 and the second-highest exposure in 2009 to reduce biomass 50%. Grass mortality increased with increasing EC levels. Reed canarygrass and timothy were most susceptible to increasing salinity, with 50% mortality (LD(50)) of both grass species occurring between 983 and 1,186 EC(days). Moderate salinity tolerance was exhibited by orchardgrass, which required 1,977 and 1,844 EC(days); creeping foxtail, which required 1,998 and 2,431 EC(days); and tall fescue, which required 2,501 and >2,840 EC(days) to LD(50) in 2008 and 2009, respectively. Foxtail barley, altai wildrye, and tall wheatgrass were most tolerant of salinity and persisted with little mortality occurring at 3,033 and 2,840 EC(days) in 2008 and 2009, respectively. All grass species with higher growth rates than foxtail barley and altai wildrye were more susceptible to salinity, with the exception of tall wheatgrass. Growth rates of foxtail barley and altai wildrye were less than they were for other grasses, suggesting that slower growth rates may aid in salinity tolerance.
Author Address [Ransom, Corey V.] Winfield Solut, Twin Falls, ID 83301 USA; Utah State Univ, Dept Plants Soils & Climate, Logan, UT 84322 USA; Utah State Univ, USDA ARS, Forage & Range Res Lab, Logan, UT 84322 USA
Reprint Address Ransom, CV (corresponding author), Winfield Solut, Twin Falls, ID 83301 USA.
E-mail Address corey.ransom@usu.edu
ResearcherID Number Ransom, Corey/E-5927-2011
ORCID Number Waldron, Blair/0000-0003-3735-5326
Funding Agency and Grant Number Utah Agricultural Experiment Station [8177]
Funding Text This research was funded in part by the Utah Agricultural Experiment Station, Publication 8177.
Times Cited 7
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 7
Publisher WEED SCI SOC AMER
Publisher City LAWRENCE
Publisher Address 810 EAST 10TH ST, LAWRENCE, KS 66044-8897 USA
ISSN 0043-1745
29-Character Source Abbreviation WEED SCI
ISO Source Abbreviation Weed Sci.
Publication Date OCT-DEC
Year Published 2011
Volume 59
Issue 4
Beginning Page 500
Ending Page 505
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1614/WS-D-10-00164.1
Page Count 6
Web of Science Category Agronomy; Plant Sciences
Subject Category Agriculture; Plant Sciences
Document Delivery Number 835HE
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000296026400009
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