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Authors Katuwal, KB; Xiao, B; Jespersen, D
Author Full Name Katuwal, Krishna B.; Xiao, Bo; Jespersen, David
Title Physiological responses and tolerance mechanisms of seashore paspalum and centipedegrass exposed to osmotic and iso-osmotic salt stresses
Source JOURNAL OF PLANT PHYSIOLOGY
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Osmotic stress; Salt stress; Seashore paspalum; Centipedegrass; Osmotic adjustment; Antioxidant enzymes
Keywords Plus ANTIOXIDANT ENZYME-ACTIVITY; GROWTH-RESPONSE; SALINITY TOLERANCE; LIPID-PEROXIDATION; ION RELATIONS; DROUGHT; ADJUSTMENT; ACCUMULATION; NACL; GENOTYPES
Abstract Osmotic stresses caused by reduced water availability or the accumulation of salts in the soil can be highly damaging to plants. The objective of this study was to investigate physiological responses and tolerance mechanisms of two turfgrass species (seashore paspalum and centipedegrass) with distinct differences in salinity tolerance exposed to osmotic and iso-osmotic salt stresses. Three turfgrass genotypes including seashore paspalums 'Seastar' and 'UGP113', and centipedegrass 'TifBlair' were grown in 1/2 strength Hoagland's solution with three different treatment conditions; control (no external addition), salt stress (-0.4 MPa by adding NaCl) and osmotic stress [-0.4 MPa by adding polyethylene glycol (PEG)]. Osmotic stress damages were more severe with greater reductions in turf quality, photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), relative water content (RWC) and leaf water potential (Psi w) compared to iso-osmotic salt stress in both seashore paspalum and centipedegrass. Greater osmotic adjustment (OA) with greater accumulation of metabolically inexpensive inorganic osmolytes (Na+) helped turfgrasses to lessen damages in salt stress compared to osmotic stress. However, such accumulation of Na+ resulted ion-toxicity and triggered some damages in terms of increased electrolyte leakage (EL) and reduced total protein in salt-sensitive centipedegrass. Seashore paspalum had better ion regulation and also maintained greater antioxidant enzyme activities compared to centipedegrass; therefore it was able to avoid ion-specific damages under salt stress. Differences in the utilization of specific solutes for osmotic adjustment and antioxidant metabolism are partially responsible for the differences in salt versus osmotic stress responses in these species; the regulation of these defense mechanisms requires further investigation.
Author Address [Katuwal, Krishna B.; Jespersen, David] Univ Georgia, Dept Crop & Soil Sci, Griffin, GA 30223 USA; [Xiao, Bo] Yangtze Univ, Coll Hort & Gardening, Jingzhou 434025, Peoples R China
Reprint Address Jespersen, D (corresponding author), 1109 Expt St, Griffin, GA 30223 USA.
E-mail Address djesper@uga.edu
Funding Agency and Grant Number University of Georgia Research Foundation
Funding Text This project was funded by the University of Georgia Research Foundation. Technical assistance from Viktor Tishchenko and the Envirotron Facilities is appreciated.
Publisher ELSEVIER GMBH
Publisher City MUNICH
Publisher Address HACKERBRUCKE 6, 80335 MUNICH, GERMANY
ISSN 0176-1617
29-Character Source Abbreviation J PLANT PHYSIOL
ISO Source Abbreviation J. Plant Physiol.
Publication Date MAY
Year Published 2020
Volume 248
Article Number 153154
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1016/j.jplph.2020.153154
Page Count 11
Web of Science Category Plant Sciences
Subject Category Plant Sciences
Document Delivery Number LK1XA
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000530650800008
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