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Authors Romeh, AAA
Author Full Name Romeh, Ahmed Ali Ali
Title Phytoremediation of azoxystrobin and its degradation products in soil by P-major L. under cold and salinity stress
Source PESTICIDE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Azoxystrobin; Degradation products; P. major; Salt stress; Cold stress
Keywords Plus TOLERANT PLANTAGO-MARITIMA; SALT STRESS; ABIOTIC STRESS; FUNGICIDE AZOXYSTROBIN; ANTIOXIDANT ENZYMES; DISEASE RESISTANCE; ABSCISIC-ACID; HALOPHYTE; METABOLISM; PESTICIDES
Abstract Azoxystrobin is a broad-spectrum, systemic and soil-applied fungicide used for crop protection against the four major classes of pathogenic fungi. The use of azoxystrobin use has induced water pollution and ecotoxicological effects upon aquatic organisms, long half-life in soils, as well as heath issues. Such issues may be solved by phytoremediation. Here, we tested the uptake and translocation of azoxystrobin and its degradation products by Plantago major, under cold stress and salt stress. The result demonstrated that azoxystrobin significantly accumulated in P. major roots under salinity conditions more than that in the P. major roots under cold conditions and natural condition within two days of experimental period. In P. major roots and leaves, the chromatograms of HPLC for azoxystrobin and metabolites under natural condition (control) and stressed samples (cold stress and salt stress) show different patterns of metabolism pathways reflecting changes in the degradation products. Azoxystrobin carboxylic acid (AZ-acid) formed by methyl ester hydrolysis was an important route in the roots and the leaves. AZ-pyOH and AZ-benzoic were detected in P. major roots under cold and salt stress, while did not detected in P. major roots under natural condition. In the leaves, AZ-pyOH and AZ-benzoic were detected in all treatments between 4 and 12 days of exposure. Shoots of the stressed plants had greater H2O2 and proline contents than was observed in the control plants. The level of 100 mM NaCI treatment induced significantly higher peroxidase (POD) activity than the non-treated control group. Leaf Chlorophyll contents in the plants at 80 and 100 mM NaCI were significantly reduced than was observed in the control plants. I concluded that P. major had a high potential to contribute to remediation of saline-soil contaminated with azoxystrobin. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Author Address [Romeh, Ahmed Ali Ali] Zagazig Univ, Plant Prod Dept, Fac Technol & Dev, Zagazig, Egypt
Reprint Address Romeh, AAA (corresponding author), Zagazig Univ, Plant Prod Dept, Fac Technol & Dev, Zagazig, Egypt.
E-mail Address ahmedromeh2006@yahoo.com
ORCID Number Romeh, ahmed/0000-0002-9139-6201
Times Cited 7
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 8
Publisher ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE
Publisher City SAN DIEGO
Publisher Address 525 B ST, STE 1900, SAN DIEGO, CA 92101-4495 USA
ISSN 0048-3575
29-Character Source Abbreviation PESTIC BIOCHEM PHYS
ISO Source Abbreviation Pest. Biochem. Physiol.
Publication Date OCT
Year Published 2017
Volume 142
Beginning Page 21
Ending Page 31
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1016/j.pestbp.2016.12.010
Page Count 11
Web of Science Category Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Entomology; Physiology
Subject Category Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Entomology; Physiology
Document Delivery Number FM2OI
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000414823700004
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