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Authors Adhikari, A; White, JD
Author Full Name Adhikari, Arjun; White, Joseph D.
Title Plant water use characteristics of five dominant shrub species of the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas, USA: implications for shrubland restoration and conservation
Source CONSERVATION PHYSIOLOGY
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Gas exchange; soil salinity; soil water deficit; soil water potential; thorn shrubs
Keywords Plus STOMATAL CONDUCTANCE; ABSCISIC-ACID; PREDAWN PLANT; WOODY-PLANTS; STRESS; PHOTOSYNTHESIS; DROUGHT; LEAF; TREE; RESPONSES
Abstract The biogeographic distribution of plant species is inherently associated with the plasticity of physiological adaptations to environmental variation. For semi-arid shrublands with a legacy of saline soils, characterization of soil water-tolerant shrub species is necessary for habitat restoration given future projection of increased drought magnitude and persistence in these ecosystems. Five dominant native shrub species commonly found in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, TX, USA, were studied, namely Acacia farnesiana, Celtis ehrenbergiana, Forestiera angustifolia, Parkinsonia aculeata and Prosopis glandulosa. To simulate drought conditions, we suspended watering of healthy, greenhouse-grown plants for 4 weeks. Effects of soil salinity were also studied by dosing plants with 10% NaCl solution with suspended watering. For soil water deficit treatment, the soil water potential of P. glandulosa was the highest (-1.20 MPa), followed by A. farnesiana (-4.69 MPa), P. aculeata (-5.39 MPa), F. angustifolia (-6.20 MPa) and C. ehrenbergiana (-10.02 MPa). For the soil salinity treatment, P. glandulosa also had the highest soil water potential value (-1.60 MPa), followed by C. ehrenbergiana (-1.70 MPa), A. farnesiana (-1.84 MPa), P. aculeata (-2.04 MPa) and F. angustifolia (-6.99 MPa). Within the species, only C. ehrenbergiana and F. angustifolia for soil water deficit treatment and A. farnesiana for the salinity treatment had significantly lower soil water potential after 4 weeks of treatment (P < 0.05). We found that soil water potential, stomatal conductance and net photosynthesis of the species significantly reduced over time for both treatments (P < 0.05). We conclude that while all species exhibited capacities to withstand current water availability, some species demonstrated limited tolerance for extreme water stress that may be important for management of future shrub diversity in Lower Rio Grande Valley.
Author Address [Adhikari, Arjun; White, Joseph D.] Baylor Univ, Dept Biol, One Bear Pl 97388, Waco, TX 76798 USA; [White, Joseph D.] Baylor Univ, Inst Ecol Earth & Environm Sci, Waco, TX 76798 USA
Reprint Address Adhikari, A (corresponding author), Baylor Univ, Dept Biol, One Bear Pl 97388, Waco, TX 76798 USA.
E-mail Address arjun_adhikari@baylor.edu
Funding Agency and Grant Number Folmar Research Fund of Baylor University
Funding Text This research was made possible through the US Fish and Wildlife Services (FWS Agreement Number: 201819J608) with special support by Kelly McDowell and Mitch Stenberg. Additional funding was provided by Folmar Research Fund of Baylor University. We thank the three anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments and suggestions on the manuscript.
Times Cited 6
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 7
Publisher OXFORD UNIV PRESS
Publisher City OXFORD
Publisher Address GREAT CLARENDON ST, OXFORD OX2 6DP, ENGLAND
ISSN 2051-1434
29-Character Source Abbreviation CONSERV PHYSIOL
ISO Source Abbreviation Conserv. Physiol.
Year Published 2014
Volume 2
Issue 1
Article Number cou005
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1093/conphys/cou005
Page Count 9
Web of Science Category Biodiversity Conservation; Ecology; Environmental Sciences; Physiology
Subject Category Biodiversity & Conservation; Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Physiology
Document Delivery Number V43TN
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000209703800001
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