Loading content, please wait..
loading..
Logo
Version 3.22
or
Authors Leon, RG; van der Laat, R
Author Full Name Leon, Ramon G.; van der Laat, Rocio
Title Herbicidal and Seed Dormancy Induction Activity of Fermentation Residual Vinasse
Source WEED SCIENCE
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Allelopathy; cultural practices; dormancy; germination; integrated weed management; natural herbicides; seed; seedbanks
Keywords Plus CRABGRASS DIGITARIA-CILIARIS; SUGARCANE ETHANOL-PRODUCTION; GERMINATION; TRENDS; WEED; GROWTH; SICKLEPOD; ECOLOGY; FUEL
Abstract Vinasse, a liquid fermentation residual of bio-ethanol production that also contains solid particles in suspension, is commonly used as a soil amendment. Previous studies reported vinasse reduced seed germination and seedling establishment, suggesting herbicidal activity. Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine whether vinasse herbicidal activity is present in the liquid or solid phase, and whether it affects plants during seed early germination (i.e., imbibition), late germination (i.e., embryo growth and radicle protrusion), or seedling growth. Most of the herbicidal activity was associated with the liquid phase, and for most species, seed viability was predominantly affected after the imbibition phase. Susceptibility to vinasse was species dependent. Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) germination was <8% when seeds were imbibed and germinated in vinasse solutions or imbibed in water and germinated in vinasse. Conversely, imbibing lettuce seeds in vinasse solutions and germinating them in water did not change their germination in comparison with seeds imbibed and germinated in water (>80% germination). Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and sicklepod [Senna obtusifolia (L.) H. S. Irwin & Barneby] germination decreased 10% and 35% when seeds were imbibed and germinated in vinasse, respectively, while Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri S. Watson) and southern crabgrass [Digitaria ciliaris (Retz.) Koeler] germination decreased >90%. All evaluated species reduced radicle growth as vinasse concentration increased. Filtered liquid vinasse with reduced concentration of salt and ionic compounds inhibited radicle growth similarly to unfiltered vinasse, indicating that the herbicidal activity was not due to osmotic effects and was likely present in the organic liquid phase. Amaranthus palmeri, S. obtusifolia, and D. ciliaris increased the proportion of dormant seed more than 2-fold when they were imbibed or imbibed and germinated in vinasse solutions. Vinasse might be useful for weed management to reduce germinable weed seedbanks by increasing seedling mortality and seed dormancy either by properly timing of its application as a soil amendment or by purifying herbicidal compounds and using them directly for weed control.
Author Address [Leon, Ramon G.] North Carolina State Univ, Dept Crop & Soil Sci, Raleigh, NC 27695 USA; [van der Laat, Rocio] Univ Florida, West Florida Res & Educ Ctr, Jay, FL USA
Reprint Address Leon, RG (corresponding author), North Carolina State Univ, 4402C Williams Hall, Raleigh, NC 27695 USA.
E-mail Address rleon@ncsu.edu
ORCID Number Leon, Ramon/0000-0002-1924-3331
Publisher CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS
Publisher City NEW YORK
Publisher Address 32 AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS, NEW YORK, NY 10013-2473 USA
ISSN 0043-1745
29-Character Source Abbreviation WEED SCI
ISO Source Abbreviation Weed Sci.
Publication Date MAY-JUN
Year Published 2018
Volume 66
Issue 3
Beginning Page 317
Ending Page 323
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1017/wsc.2017.84
Page Count 7
Web of Science Category Agronomy; Plant Sciences
Subject Category Agriculture; Plant Sciences
Document Delivery Number GM8HN
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000438464800006
Plants associated with this reference

LEGAL NOTICES — This website is protected by Copyright © The University of Sussex, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021. The eHALOPH database is protected by Database Right and Copyright © The University of Sussex and other contributors, 2006, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021. This database is based on an earlier work by James Aronson.
THIS WEBSITE AND THIS DATABASE ARE PROVIDED ON AN "AS IS" BASIS, AND YOU USE THEM AND RELY ON THEM AT YOUR OWN RISK.

Contact email: halophytes@sussex.ac.uk
Credits – Tim Flowers, Joaquim Santos, Moritz Jahns, Brian Warburton, Peter Reed