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Authors Kwak, TJ; Zedler, JB
Author Full Name Kwak, TJ; Zedler, JB
Title Food web analysis of southern California coastal wetlands using multiple stable isotopes
Source OECOLOGIA
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords food web; restoration; salt marsh; stable isotopes; wetland
Keywords Plus SALT-MARSH ESTUARIES; ORGANIC-MATTER FLOW; CARBON ISOTOPE; SPARTINA-ALTERNIFLORA; BENTHIC MICROALGAE; NUTRIENT DYNAMICS; NITROGEN; GEORGIA; RATIOS; ECOSYSTEM
Abstract Carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur stable isotopes were used to characterize the food webs (i.e., sources of carbon and trophic status of consumers) in Tijuana Estuary and San Dieguito Lagoon. Producer groups were most clearly differentiated by carbon, then by sulfur, and least clearly by nitrogen isotope measurements. Consumer N-15 isotopic enrichment suggested that there are four trophic levels in the Tijuana Estuary food web and three in San Dieguito Lagoon. A significant difference in multiple isotope ratio distributions of fishes between wetlands suggested that the food web of San Dieguito Lagoon is less complex than that of Tijuana Estuary. Associations among sources and consumers indicated that inputs from intertidal macroalgae, marsh microalgae, and Spartina foliosa provide the organic matter that supports invertebrates, fishes, and the light-footed clapper rail (Rallus longirostris levipes). These three producers occupy tidal channels, low salt marsh, and mid salt marsh habitats. The only consumer sampled that appears dependent upon primary productivity from high salt marsh habitat is the sera (Porzana carolina). Two- and three-source mixing models identified Spartina as the major organic matter source for fishes, and macroalgae for invertebrates and the light-footed clapper rail in Tijuana Estuary. In San Dieguito Lagoon, a system lacking Spartina, inputs of macroalgae and microalgae support fishes. Salicornia virginica, S. subterminalis, Monanthochloe littoralis, sewage-derived organic matter, and suspended particulate organic matter were deductively excluded as dominant, direct influences on the food web. The demonstration of a salt marsh-channel linkage in these systems affirms that these habitats should be managed as a single ecosystem and that the restoration of intertidal marshes for endangered birds and other biota is compatible with enhancement of coastal fish populations; heretofore, these have been considered to be competing objectives.
Author Address SAN DIEGO STATE UNIV,DEPT BIOL,PACIFIC ESTUARINE RES LAB,SAN DIEGO,CA 92182SAN DIEGO STATE UNIV,DEPT BIOL,PACIFIC ESTUARINE RES LAB,SAN DIEGO,CA 92182
ORCID Number Kwak, Thomas/0000-0002-0616-137X
Times Cited 250
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 267
Publisher SPRINGER VERLAG
Publisher City NEW YORK
Publisher Address 175 FIFTH AVE, NEW YORK, NY 10010
ISSN 0029-8549
29-Character Source Abbreviation OECOLOGIA
ISO Source Abbreviation Oecologia
Publication Date APR
Year Published 1997
Volume 110
Issue 2
Beginning Page 262
Ending Page 277
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1007/s004420050159
Page Count 16
Web of Science Category Ecology
Subject Category Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Document Delivery Number WW157
Unique Article Identifier WOS:A1997WW15700016
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