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Publication Type J
Authors Infante-Izquierdo, M. D., J. M. Castillo, B. J. Grewell, F. J. J. Nieva and A. F. Munoz-Rodriguez
Title Differential Effects of Increasing Salinity on Germination and Seedling Growth of Native and Exotic Invasive Cordgrasses
Source Plants-Basel
Author Keywords climate change dormancy Odiel Marshes quiescent seed salinity tolerance sea level rise radicle spartina-densiflora climate-change temperature environment adaptation halophytes strategies maritima alterniflora coastal
Abstract Soil salinity is a key environmental factor influencing germination and seedling establishment in salt marshes. Global warming and sea level rise are changing estuarine salinity, and may modify the colonization ability of halophytes. We evaluated the effects of increasing salinity on germination and seedling growth of native Spartina maritima and invasive S. densiflora from wetlands of the Odiel-Tinto Estuary. Responses were assessed following salinity exposure from fresh water to hypersaline conditions and germination recovery of non-germinated seeds when transferred to fresh water. The germination of both species was inhibited and delayed at high salinities, while pre-exposure to salinity accelerated the speed of germination in recovery assays compared to non-pre-exposed seeds. S. densiflora was more tolerant of salinity at germination than S. maritima. S. densiflora was able to germinate at hypersalinity and its germination percentage decreased at higher salinities compared to S. maritima. In contrast, S. maritima showed higher salinity tolerance in relation to seedling growth. Contrasting results were observed with differences in the tidal elevation of populations. Our results suggest S. maritima is a specialist species with respect to salinity, while S. densiflora is a generalist capable of germination of growth under suboptimal conditions. Invasive S. densiflora has greater capacity than native S. maritima to establish from seed with continued climate change and sea level rise.
Author Address [Infante-Izquierdo, Maria Dolores; Nieva, F. Javier J.; Munoz-Rodriguez, Adolfo F.] Univ Huelva, Dept Ciencias Integradas, Fuerzas Armadas Ave,Campus El Carmen, Huelva 21071, Spain. [Castillo, Jesus M.] Univ Seville, Dept Biol Vegetal & Ecol, Ap 1095, E-41080 Seville, Spain. [Grewell, Brenda J.] Univ Calif Davis, USDA ARS, Invas Species & Pollinator Hlth Res Unit, Dept Plant Sci, MS-4,1 Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616 USA. Infante-Izquierdo, MD (reprint author), Univ Huelva, Dept Ciencias Integradas, Fuerzas Armadas Ave,Campus El Carmen, Huelva 21071, Spain. mariadolores.infante@dfa.uhu.es; manucas@us.es; bjgrewell@ucdavis.edu; jimenez@uhu.es; adolfo.munoz@dbasp.uhu.es
29-Character Source Abbreviation Plants-Basel
Publication Date Oct
Year Published 2019
Volume 8
Issue 10
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.3390/plants8100372
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000498270000018
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