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Authors Mavrodi, OV; Jung, CM; Eberly, JO; Hendry, SV; Namjilsuren, S; Biber, PD; Indest, KJ; Mavrodi, DV
Author Full Name Mavrodi, Olga, V; Jung, Carina M.; Eberly, Jed O.; Hendry, Samuel, V; Namjilsuren, Sanchirmaa; Biber, Patrick D.; Indest, Karl J.; Mavrodi, Dmitri, V
Title Rhizosphere Microbial Communities of Spartina alterniflora and Juncus roemerianus From Restored and Natural Tidal Marshes on Deer Island, Mississippi
Source FRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Spartina altemiflora; Juncus roemarianus; rhizosphere microbiome; coastal marshes; coastal restoration
Keywords Plus SUDDEN VEGETATION DIEBACK; SALT MARSHES; PLANT; PSEUDOMONAS; RHIZOBACTERIA; DIVERSITY; ATLANTIC
Abstract The U. S. Gulf of Mexico is experiencing a dramatic increase in tidal marsh restoration actions, which involves planting coastal areas with smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) and black needlerush (Juncus roemerianus) for erosion control and to provide habitat for fish and wildlife. It can take decades for sedimentary cycles in restored marshes to approach reference conditions, and the contribution of the sediment microbial communities to these processes is poorly elucidated. In this study, we addressed this gap by comparing rhizosphere microbiomes of S. alterniflora and J. roemerianus from two restored marshes and a natural reference marsh located at Deer Island, MS. Our results revealed that plants from the restored and reference areas supported similar microbial diversity indicating the rapid colonization of planted grasses with indigenous soil microbiota. Although close in composition, the microbial communities from the three studied sites differed significantly in the relative abundance of specific taxa. The observed differences are likely driven by the host plant identity and properties of sediment material used for the creation of restored marshes. Some of the differentially distributed groups of bacteria include taxa involved in the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur, and may influence the succession of vegetation at the restored sites to climax condition. We also demonstrated that plants from the restored and reference sites vary in the frequency of culturable rhizobacteria that exhibit traits commonly associated with the promotion of plant growth and suppression of phytopathogenic fungi. Our findings will contribute to the establishment of benchmarks for the assessment of the outcome of coastal restoration projects in the Gulf of Mexico and better define factors that affect the long-term resiliency of tidal marshes and their vulnerability to climate change.
Author Address [Mavrodi, Olga, V; Hendry, Samuel, V; Namjilsuren, Sanchirmaa; Mavrodi, Dmitri, V] Univ Southern Mississippi, Dept Biol Sci, Hattiesburg, MS 39406 USA; [Jung, Carina M.; Eberly, Jed O.; Indest, Karl J.] US Army, Engineer Res & Dev Ctr, Environm Lab, Vicksburg, MS 39183 USA; [Biber, Patrick D.] Univ Southern Mississippi, Gulf Coast Res Lab, Hattiesburg, MS 39406 USA; [Eberly, Jed O.] Montana State Univ, Cent Agr Res Ctr, Moccasin, MT USA
Reprint Address Mavrodi, DV (reprint author), Univ Southern Mississippi, Dept Biol Sci, Hattiesburg, MS 39406 USA.; Indest, KJ (reprint author), US Army, Engineer Res & Dev Ctr, Environm Lab, Vicksburg, MS 39183 USA.
E-mail Address Karl.J.Indest@usace.army.mil; dmitri.mavrodi@usm.edu
ORCID Number Biber, Patrick/0000-0002-6358-0976; Jung, Carina/0000-0002-3171-7341; Mavrodi, Dmitri/0000-0002-9644-2094
Funding Agency and Grant Number U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Research and Development Center (ERDC) under the terms of the Gulf Coast Cooperative Ecosystems Studies Unit (CESU) [W912HZ-16-2-0020]; Mississippi INBRE - Institutional Development Award (IDeA) from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health [P20GM103476]
Funding Text This study was funded by cooperative agreement W912HZ-16-2-0020 from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Research and Development Center (ERDC) under the terms of the Gulf Coast Cooperative Ecosystems Studies Unit (CESU). Views, opinions, and/or findings contained herein are those of the authors and should not be construed as an Official Department of the Army position or decision unless so designated by other official documentation. The authors also acknowledge support from the Mississippi INBRE, funded by an Institutional Development Award (IDeA) from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under grant P20GM103476.
Times Cited 1
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 1
Publisher FRONTIERS MEDIA SA
Publisher City LAUSANNE
Publisher Address AVENUE DU TRIBUNAL FEDERAL 34, LAUSANNE, CH-1015, SWITZERLAND
ISSN 1664-302X
29-Character Source Abbreviation FRONT MICROBIOL
ISO Source Abbreviation Front. Microbiol.
Publication Date DEC 11
Year Published 2018
Volume 9
Article Number 3049
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.3389/fmicb.2018.03049
Page Count 13
Web of Science Category Microbiology
Subject Category Microbiology
Document Delivery Number HD8SH
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000452828500003
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