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Authors Wu, W; Huang, HL; Biber, P; Bethel, M
Author Full Name Wu, Wei; Huang, Hailong; Biber, Patrick; Bethel, Matthew
Title Litter Decomposition of Spartina alterniflora and Juncus roemerianus: Implications of Climate Change in Salt Marshes
Source JOURNAL OF COASTAL RESEARCH
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Northern Gulf of Mexico; sea-level rise; salinity; model selection
Keywords Plus SEA-LEVEL RISE; ORGANIC-MATTER DECAY; FUNGAL DIVERSITY; MODEL SELECTION; TEMPERATURE SENSITIVITY; PHRAGMITES-AUSTRALIS; SALTWATER INTRUSION; COASTAL MARSHES; LEAF-LITTER; GULF-COAST
Abstract Decomposition of plant litter in salt marshes plays an important role in coastal trophodynamics, nutrient cycling, sediment trapping, and short-term carbon storage, all of which are likely to be affected by climate change and accelerated sea-level rise. Warmer temperatures, altered precipitation patterns, longer and more frequent inundation, and saltwater intrusion will all interact to affect decomposition of plant litter in a complex way. A combination of field experiments and model selection techniques was applied to study how these environmental factors affected litter decomposition of two dominant salt marsh species, Spartina alterniflora and Juncus roemerianus, along the northern Gulf of Mexico. The results from summer field experiments conducted between June and August of 2013 showed that S. alterniflora in the low marsh had higher litter losses (0.286 +/- 0.0883 g d(-1), mean standard deviation) and decomposition coefficients (0.0115 +/- 0.00416 d(-1)) than J. roemerianus in the midmarsh locations (0.0963 +/- 0.0480 g 0.00416 +/- 0.00223 d(-1)). Modeling results showed that the interaction between temperature and salinity significantly affected decomposition coefficients of both species positively during this experiment. This study suggests that accelerated leaf litter decomposition due to rising temperature and increased salinity will occur under climate change and sea-level rise, and this will potentially lead to important ecological consequences for salt marshes.
Author Address [Wu, Wei; Huang, Hailong; Biber, Patrick] Univ Southern Mississippi, Dept Coastal Sci, Gulf Coast Res Lab, Ocean Springs, MS 39564 USA; [Bethel, Matthew] Univ New Oxleans, Pontchartrain Inst Environm Sci, New Orleans, LA 70148 USA; [Bethel, Matthew] Louisiana State Univ, Louisiana Sea Grant Coll Program, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 USA
Reprint Address Wu, W (reprint author), Univ Southern Mississippi, Dept Coastal Sci, Gulf Coast Res Lab, Ocean Springs, MS 39564 USA.
E-mail Address wei.wu@usm.edu
ORCID Number Biber, Patrick/0000-0002-6358-0976
Funding Agency and Grant Number National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Gulf of Mexico Coastal Resilience Networks Program [NA100AR4170078]; University of Southern Mississippi (USM); Mississippi -Alabama Sea Grant Consortium (MASGC); NOAANational Oceanic Atmospheric Admin (NOAA) - USA; MASGC; Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve
Funding Text This work has been supported with funding provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Gulf of Mexico Coastal Resilience Networks Program under Cooperative Agreement NA100AR4170078 with the University of Southern Mississippi (USM), and the Mississippi -Alabama Sea Grant Consortium (MASGC). The funding support of NOAA and MASGC is gratefully acknowledged. We would like to thank Dr. Chongfeng Gong, Linh Pham, and Guoxun Wu for helping with the field experiments. We also thank the staff at the Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve for their support of this work and providing access to the field sites for this study. Special thanks go to Dr. Kevin Dillon and his student Josh Allen for their generous help with the laboratory work. We also acknowledge the Louisiana Sea Grant College Program for its generous support of the publication of this manuscript and dissemination of the results of this work.
Times Cited 7
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 8
Publisher COASTAL EDUCATION & RESEARCH FOUNDATION
Publisher City COCONUT CREEK
Publisher Address 5130 NW 54TH STREET, COCONUT CREEK, FL 33073 USA
ISSN 0749-0208
29-Character Source Abbreviation J COASTAL RES
ISO Source Abbreviation J. Coast. Res.
Publication Date MAR
Year Published 2017
Volume 33
Issue 2
Beginning Page 372
Ending Page 384
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-15-00199.1
Page Count 13
Web of Science Category Environmental Sciences; Geography, Physical; Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Subject Category Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Physical Geography; Geology
Document Delivery Number EP4MX
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000397355700013
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