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Authors Tumas, HR; Shamblin, BM; Woodrey, MS; Nairn, CJ
Author Full Name Tumas, Hayley R.; Shamblin, Brian M.; Woodrey, Mark S.; Nairn, Campbell J.
Title Broad-scale patterns of genetic diversity and structure in a foundational salt marsh species black needlerush (Juncus roemerianus)
Source CONSERVATION GENETICS
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Clonal diversity; Coastal restoration; Estuarine; Plant species; Population genetics
Keywords Plus GENOTYPIC DIVERSITY; POPULATION-STRUCTURE; LANDSCAPE GENETICS; CONSERVATION; DISPERSAL; SIZE; INCREASES; DYNAMICS; IMPACTS; HISTORY
Abstract Clonal and genetic diversity in foundational plant species are critical for species resiliency and ecosystem processes, both of which contribute to restoration success; however, genetic data is often lacking for common plant species used in many restoration practices. Only a few plant species dominate salt marshes, ecologically and economically valuable ecosystems targeted for restoration due to global decline. Despite being a foundational species in southeastern United States salt marshes black needlerush (Juncus roemerianus Scheele) is understudied, especially in comparison to the co-occurring smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora Loisel). We used a panel of 18 microsatellite markers on 849 samples of J. roemerianus collected at 17 sites across a majority of the species range from Mississippi to South Carolina to measure clonal and genetic diversity and characterize population structure. Results are consistent with previous genetic studies on J. roemerianus and other clonal plant species in that clonal and genetic diversity were higher than expected based on life history literature, with an average genotypic diversity (G(D)) of 0.67 and average observed heterozygosity (H-O) of 0.56. Differences in diversity between the ecologically and environmentally divergent Gulf (G(D)=0.64, H-O=0.52) and Atlantic (G(D)=0.80, H-O=0.45) coasts suggest that life history strategy may vary by environment. Hierarchical structure was apparent across the study area, with STRUCTURE analyses identifying three genetic clusters that further subdivided into five clusters and a broad transition zone. The scale of this genetic differentiation should be considered in sourcing plants for salt marsh restoration efforts.
Author Address [Tumas, Hayley R.; Shamblin, Brian M.; Nairn, Campbell J.] Univ Georgia, Daniel B Warnell Sch Forestry & Nat Resources, 180 East Green St, Athens, GA 30602 USA; [Woodrey, Mark S.] Mississippi State Univ, Coastal Res & Extens Ctr, Grand Bay Natl Estuarine Res Reserve, 6005 Bayou Heron Rd, Moss Point, MS 39564 USA; [Tumas, Hayley R.] Univ Oxford, Dept Plant Sci, South Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3RB, England
Reprint Address Nairn, CJ (reprint author), Univ Georgia, Daniel B Warnell Sch Forestry & Nat Resources, 180 East Green St, Athens, GA 30602 USA.
E-mail Address nairn@uga.edu
Publisher SPRINGER
Publisher City DORDRECHT
Publisher Address VAN GODEWIJCKSTRAAT 30, 3311 GZ DORDRECHT, NETHERLANDS
ISSN 1566-0621
29-Character Source Abbreviation CONSERV GENET
ISO Source Abbreviation Conserv. Genet.
Publication Date AUG
Year Published 2019
Volume 20
Issue 4
Beginning Page 903
Ending Page 915
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1007/s10592-019-01183-3
Page Count 13
Web of Science Category Biodiversity Conservation; Genetics & Heredity
Subject Category Biodiversity & Conservation; Genetics & Heredity
Document Delivery Number IH3MY
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000474398200017
Plants associated with this reference

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