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Authors Min, XJ; Zang, YX; Sun, W; Ma, JY
Author Full Name Min, X-J; Zang, Y-X; Sun, W.; Ma, J-Y
Title Contrasting water sources and water-use efficiency in coexisting desert plants in two saline-sodic soils in northwest China
Source PLANT BIOLOGY
Language English
Document Type Article; Early Access
Author Keywords Photosynthesis; saline-sodic; stable isotopes; water source; water-use efficiency
Keywords Plus CARBON-ISOTOPE DISCRIMINATION; GAS-EXCHANGE; USE PATTERNS; SALT; ADAPTATION; SHRUBS; GROWTH; ADJUSTMENT; TOLERANCE; NITROGEN
Abstract Soil degradation resulting from various types of salinity is a major environmental problem, especially in arid and semiarid regions. Exploring the water-related physiological traits of halophytes is useful for understanding the mechanisms of salt tolerance. This knowledge could be used to rehabilitate degraded arid lands. To investigate whether different types of salinity influence the water sources and water-use efficiency of desert plants (Karelinia caspia, Tamarix hohenackeri, Nitraria sibirica, Phragmites australis, Alhagi sparsifolia, Suaeda microphylla, Kalidium foliatum) in natural environments, we measured leaf gas exchange, leaf carbon and xylem oxygen isotope composition and soil oxygen isotope composition at neutral saline-sodic site (NSS) and alkaline saline-sodic site (ASS) in northwest China. The studied plants had different xylem water oxygen isotope compositions (delta O-18) and foliar carbon isotope compositions (delta C-13), indicating that desert plants coexist through differentiation in water use patterns. Compared to that at the NSS site, the stem water in K. caspia, A. sparsifolia and S. microphylla was depleted in O-18 at the ASS site, which indicates that plants can switch to obtain water from deeper soil layers when suffering environmental stress from both salinity and alkalinisation. Alhagi sparsifolia had higher delta C-13 at the ASS site than at the NSS site, while K. caspia and S. microphylla had lower delta C-13, which may have resulted from interspecific differences in plant alkali and salt tolerance ability. Our results suggest that under severe salinity and alkalinity, plants may exploit deeper soil water to avoid ion toxicity resulting from high concentrations of soluble salts in the superficial soil layer. In managed lands, it is vital to select and cultivate different salt-tolerant or alkali-tolerant plant species in light of local conditions.
Author Address [Min, X-J; Zang, Y-X; Ma, J-Y] Chinese Acad Sci, Xinjiang Inst Ecol & Geog, Key Lab Biogeog & Bioresource Arid Land, Urumqi, Peoples R China; [Min, X-J; Zang, Y-X; Ma, J-Y] Chinese Acad Sci, Fukang Desert Ecol Res Stn, Fukang, Peoples R China; [Min, X-J; Zang, Y-X] Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing, Peoples R China; [Sun, W.] Northeast Normal Univ, Inst Grassland Sci, Key Lab Vegetat Ecol, Minist Educ, Changchun, Jilin, Peoples R China
Reprint Address Ma, JY (reprint author), Chinese Acad Sci, Xinjiang Inst Ecol & Geog, Urumqi 830011, Peoples R China.
E-mail Address jyma@ms.xjb.ac.cn
Funding Agency and Grant Number National Natural Science Foundation of ChinaNational Natural Science Foundation of China [41671207, 31570470]; Main Service Project of Characteristic Institute of the Chinese Academy of Sciences [TSS-2015-014-FW-5-1]; 9th Thousand Talents Program of China
Funding Text This work was financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41671207, 31570470), Main Service Project of Characteristic Institute of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (TSS-2015-014-FW-5-1) and the 9th Thousand Talents Program of China (2013).
Publisher WILEY
Publisher City HOBOKEN
Publisher Address 111 RIVER ST, HOBOKEN 07030-5774, NJ USA
ISSN 1435-8603
29-Character Source Abbreviation PLANT BIOLOGY
ISO Source Abbreviation Plant Biol.
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1111/plb.13028
Page Count 9
Web of Science Category Plant Sciences
Subject Category Plant Sciences
Document Delivery Number IN0CF
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000478350700001
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