Loading content, please wait..
loading..
Logo
Version 3.22
or
Authors Walker, LR; Barnes, PL; Powell, EA
Author Full Name Walker, LR; Barnes, PL; Powell, EA
Title Tamarix aphylla: A newly invasive tree in southern Nevada
Source WESTERN NORTH AMERICAN NATURALIST
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Tamarix aphylla; Tamarix ramosissima; invasions; drawdown zone; saltcedar athel pine; Nevada; reservoir; riparian ecology; Lake Mead
Keywords Plus DIAMETER-AGE RELATIONSHIPS; NATIVE POPULUS; RAMOSISSIMA; PATTERNS; BIOLOGY; RIVER; SALIX; US
Abstract In the southwestern United States, the normative athel pine (Tamarix aphylla) was presumed to be sterile and therefore not as likely to spread as its widely distributed, nonnative congener, T ramosissima. However, at Lake Mead National Recreation Area (LMNRA) in southern Nevada, Populations of T aphylla have recently spread beyond their limited pre-1990 distribution and now form extensive monospecific stands. Over a 3-year period, we quantified seed production and germination from 60 T aphylla trees at LMNRA. The annual mean seed production period was 50.6 days, and the mean potential germination (under laboratory conditions) was 22%, indicating that T aphylla trees at LMNRA are capable of sexual reproduction in southern Nevada. No seeds germinated in field experiments, apparently because of high soil salt levels. However, seedling regeneration is becoming increasingly common at LMNRA. Tamarix aphylla trees occupied a distinct zone along the shoreline of Lake Mead, above T ramosissima in elevation and below native Larrea tridentata communities, suggesting either competitive exclusion or differential resource utilization. The T aphylla zone tended to have the highest mean values for total vegetation cover, leaf litter depth, soil salinity, soil moisture, pH, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, and soil organic matter. The capacity for sexual reproduction of this alien plant, combined with a suite of characteristics shared with the invasive T ramosissima (e.g., drought tolerance and copious saline leaf litter), makes T aphylla a potentially invasive species along the shores of LMNRA and other mesic areas in the desert Southwest.
Author Address Univ Nevada, Dept Biol Sci, Las Vegas, NV 89154 USA
Reprint Address Walker, LR (reprint author), Univ Nevada, Dept Biol Sci, Box 454004,4505 Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV 89154 USA.
Times Cited 16
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 17
Publisher BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV
Publisher City PROVO
Publisher Address 290 LIFE SCIENCE MUSEUM, PROVO, UT 84602 USA
ISSN 1527-0904
29-Character Source Abbreviation WEST N AM NATURALIST
ISO Source Abbreviation West. North Am. Naturalist
Publication Date APR
Year Published 2006
Volume 66
Issue 2
Beginning Page 191
Ending Page 201
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.3398/1527-0904(2006)66[191:TAANIT]2.0.CO;2
Page Count 11
Web of Science Category Biodiversity Conservation; Ecology
Subject Category Biodiversity & Conservation; Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Document Delivery Number 048JM
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000237943400005
Plants associated with this reference

LEGAL NOTICES — This website is protected by Copyright © The University of Sussex, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021. The eHALOPH database is protected by Database Right and Copyright © The University of Sussex and other contributors, 2006, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021. This database is based on an earlier work by James Aronson.
THIS WEBSITE AND THIS DATABASE ARE PROVIDED ON AN "AS IS" BASIS, AND YOU USE THEM AND RELY ON THEM AT YOUR OWN RISK.

Contact email: halophytes@sussex.ac.uk
Credits – Tim Flowers, Joaquim Santos, Moritz Jahns, Brian Warburton, Peter Reed