French and Spanish (2015 entry)

BA (Hons), 4 years, UCAS: RR14
Typical A level offer: ABB

Subject overview

Why languages? 

The study of languages enables you to acquire excellent communication skills and enhance your understanding of your own and other cultures. In addition, the ability to speak a second language and the experience of having spent time studying or working abroad are major assets in the employment market. To quote Nelson Mandela: ‘If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his own language, that goes to his heart.’ 

Why languages at Sussex? 

    • Modern languages at Sussex is ranked 7th in the UK in The Guardian University Guide 2015.
    • Start post-A level and/or from beginner’s level at the appropriate standard and reach a high level of proficiency with the expert tuition of experienced language tutors. Enjoy all the academic, social, personal and – ultimately – professional benefits of the year abroad, whether working, teaching or studying at a partner university. 
    • Sussex offers different ways to study languages: 

      – courses: we offer single-honours courses (two languages) and, in some subject areas, joint-honours courses including a language, with the choice of French, Italian or Spanish. These are all four-year courses and incorporate a third year abroad, studying or working in a foreign-language setting. 

      – other opportunities to study a language: students on a wide range of non-language courses can gain proficiency in a variety of languages through one of the electives or pathways available within their course. 

Visit Electives

Visit Pathways

Open language courses 

If you are interested in learning a new language or improving your existing foreign-language skills outside the context of your chosen degree, Sussex offers the opportunity to study a language on a weekly basis with other students, members of the University staff and the local community. You can choose from Arabic, British Sign Language, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Mandarin Chinese, Russian, Spanish and Turkish classes. The majority of classes take place in the early evening. All of our open language courses offer the opportunity to develop language skills and to learn about the country and customs concerned. 

Independent language learning

The Language Learning Centre provides state-of-the-art technology that supports self-access language learning. Foreign-language newspapers and magazines are also available. Further information about these courses and tuition fees is available from the Open Course Office (email opencourses@sussex.ac.uk).

Visit the Sussex Centre for Language Studies


Course content

This course enables you to gain a high standard of proficiency in your target languages and to appreciate critically important social and cultural aspects of the countries in which those languages are spoken. 

History and culture modules give you an insight into the events and movements that have influenced countries in Europe and beyond, allowing you to explore the factors that influence your own culture before moving on to study aspects of cultural difference. These modules are complemented with material in your target languages such as films, documentaries, and live and recorded television and radio programmes, as well as written texts of all kinds including, for example, short stories, plays, and newspaper and journal articles. A vital part of your study involves considering the ways in which language reflects culture. Modules leading to cultural competence therefore form an important part of your course. 

Your language classes give you the opportunity to acquire oral and written fluency, enhanced comprehension skills, a wider vocabulary and advanced grammatical knowledge, and accuracy in your chosen languages. In the second year there is more emphasis on summarising, synthesising and handling authentic texts. Study of the culture, society and politics of the appropriate country is undertaken to prepare you for the year spent abroad. In the final year, there are opportunities to pursue independent projects and to get an introduction to interpreting and translation skills.

We continue to develop and update our modules for 2015 entry to ensure you have the best student experience. In addition to the course structure below, you may find it helpful to refer to the Modules tab.

How will I learn?

Learning and teaching are focused around language classes, complemented by lectures and seminars both on broad European issues and on specific topics relevant to the target language(s). Subjects range from popular culture to philosophy and information technology. Assessment methods include coursework, learning journals, essay writing, spoken presentations, oral and aural examining, written examinations, extended essays, projects, reports and dissertations. 

For information on teaching methods and learning resources, visit Studying at Sussex

What will I achieve?
  • advanced language and communication skills, as well as an introduction to skills in intercultural mediation such as translation and interpreting 
  • knowledge and understanding of significant aspects of the culture, developments, artefacts and achievements of Europe and of countries in other continents where French, Italian or Spanish are spoken 
  • through the crosscultural experience of a year spent studying or working abroad, skills and adaptability that give you excellent preparation for your future professional life. 

Sussex Choice

Broaden your studies, develop your interests and gain a valuable career edge with Sussex Choice. Find out about the opportunities your course offers in the accompanying tabs.

Core content

Year 1 

You study your target language(s), with the focus on accuracy and fluency in both speaking and writing. You can develop your study skills to make the best of our well-equipped Language Learning Centre. 

Alongside language study you follow modules giving you an insight into the ideas and events that underpin modern society in the countries of Europe and beyond. What is it like to live and work in France, Italy and Spain today? What place does Europe have within the wider international context and what are the attitudes of Europeans towards their own countries, Britain, the rest of Europe and the world beyond? 

You are also introduced to aspects of cultural difference. What is culture? What part does cultural competence play in communication between speakers of different mother tongues? 

Year 2 

Your language study becomes more demanding, with the focus on high levels of competence in tasks such as giving oral presentations, writing reports, summarising spoken and written texts, writing book and film reviews, and holding meetings and discussions. The advanced study of your language prepares you for your third year abroad. In addition to your language study, you explore cultural, political, historical, literary and social aspects of countries in and beyond Europe where French, Italian or Spanish are spoken. You also learn about language in use and consider ways in which language is affected by differing social contexts. How does language reflect culture? How do we signal politeness, formality, irony, etc in English? How does this compare with other languages? What issues do such questions raise for translation and mediation between cultures? You have the opportunity to investigate these and other related areas. 

Year 3 

Your third year is spent abroad, studying at one of our partner universities, on a work placement or as a teaching assistant in a school. 

Year 4 

You take language modules including an introduction to the vocational skills of translation and interpreting. You will also develop and deepen your knowledge of relevant social or cultural issues through the study of special subjects. 

Visit Course types: single honours, joint honours, major/minor

Back to module list

Cultural Encounters

15 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 1

The module aims to promote intercultural competence and cultural awareness as part of overall communicative competence. There is a chance to explore ways in which culture and language are linked and ways in which cultural values and attitudes are encoded in language. You will be provided with a theoretical framework within which you can develop an awareness of the target culture.

Europe 1900-45

15 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 1

This module focuses on the development of essential study skills such as textual analysis, note-taking, the planning and writing of essays and summaries. You will normally work with texts written in (one of) your foreign language(s).

France 1900-45

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 1

This module develops and extends the ideas and themes introduced in the module History and Culture in the 20th Century. Relevant works of literature, film, theatre and the press are studied in the target language, wherever possible. Written and oral material is drawn from a wide range of sources to make you aware of the context in which the country whose language you study has progressed towards its current situation. You will develop essential skills of note-taking, discussing, summarising, analysing and essay writing (including documentation).

French 1A

15 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 1

You will consolidate and progress your knowledge of grammar. Improved grammatical accuracy, oral and written fluency, lexis, and listening and reading comprehension are achieved through the study of a variety of topics and integrated grammar. You will also gain insight into the culture and society of your chosen country.

French 1B

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 1

You will acquire advanced knowledge of grammar and improve grammatical accuracy, oral and written fluency, lexis, and listening and reading comprehension through the study of a variety of topics and integrated grammar. There is an emphasis on the summarising and handling of authentic texts. You will also study the literature, culture, society and politics of France.

French For Bilinguals A

15 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 1

This is an entry-level module in translation theory and practice. You will submit a fortnightly translation. Weekly, you will work with a tutor on a pre-distributed text and derive a translation in class. Focused attention is given to the problematics of translation, eg basic theories and strategies available, difficulties of untranslatability, cultural/linguistic matters, and the register/genre/style demands of translation. Working is in both directions, eg theme and version. In addition to exploring the relationships between, eg accuracy, fluency and appropriacy in translation, the teaching prepares you for more comparative translation, oral-aural working, and commentary activities in French Translation Theory and Practice 1B.

French For Bilinguals B

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 1

You submit a fortnightly translation prepared at home during the spring term. Weekly, you work with a tutor on a pre-distributed text and derive a translation in class. Focused attention is given to the problems of translation, eg basic theories and strategies available, the difficulties of untranslatability, cultural/linguistic matters, and the register/genre/style demands of translation. Working is in both directions, ie theme and version. In addition to exploring the relationships between accuracy, fluency and appropriacy in translation, the teaching focuses particularly on comparative translation, oral-aural working (ie basic interpreting), and commentary activities.

Spain 1900-45

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 1

This module develops and extends the ideas and themes introduced in the lecture series History and Culture in the 20th Century. Relevant works of literature, film, theatre and the press are studied in the target language, wherever possible. Written and oral material is drawn from a wide range of sources to make students aware of the context in which the country whose language you study has progressed towards its current situation. You will develop essential skills of note-taking, discussing, summarising, analysing and essay writing (including documentation). The module will allow you to progress towards independent study.

Spanish 1A

15 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 1

You will consolidate and progress your knowledge of grammar. Improved grammatical accuracy, oral and written fluency, lexis, and listening and reading comprehension are achieved through the study of a variety of topics and integrated grammar. You will also gain insight into the culture and society of your chosen country.

Spanish 1B

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 1

You will acquire advanced knowledge of grammar and improve grammatical accuracy, oral and written fluency, lexis, and listening and reading comprehension through the study of a variety of topics and integrated grammar. There is an emphasis on the summarising and handling of authentic texts. You will also study the literature, culture, society and politics of Spain.

Spanish Intensive A

30 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 1

This is an intensive module for beginners or near beginners, enabling you to develop the language skills expected of students with a low A level grade or equivalent in one year. A thorough grounding in grammatical functions will be taught through a variety of media and topics.

Spanish Intensive B

30 credits
Spring teaching, Year 1

The module builds on the grammatical structures and language functions taught in Intensive Spanish 1A to enable you to develop in one year the skills expected of school leavers. You will improve oral and written fluency, lexis and listening and reading comprehension. A thorough grounding in grammatical functions will be taught through a variety of media and topics.

French 2A

15 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 2

Your knowledge of syntax will be revised and progressed and active knowledge of lexis increased. Speaking, listening, reading and written skills will be raised to a higher level through the study of authentic texts taken from a variety of media. The study of relevant current affairs will be an important element of the module.

French 2B

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 2

Your knowledge of syntax and lexis will continue to be enhanced alongside the skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing. Practical aspects of living, studying and working abroad will be covered, including history, geography, politics, society, culture and literature.

Language and Nation

15 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 2

Following a short introduction, the module falls into two parts. The first looks at how we discover the links between Language, Thought and Nation, and try to identify and analyse covert as well as overt associations between these. Who are the guardians and gatekeepers of our 'native' languages, and what are the pressures to have English in England, French in France but Castillian in Spain and Post-Florentine in Italy? Are some languages more equal than others, conferring more status to their users? And why do languages still change despite 'Academies'? The second part looks at instances of how expressions of the relationship between a nation and its language emerge as various literary and other genres (with particular reference to the novel), and how these feed back into the collective identity (with particular reference to representations in the cinema of various countries).

Europe 1945-date

15 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 2

The module provides you with an overview of important historical and cultural developments in the second part of the 20th century, focussing on the period from the 1940s through to the present day. Movements and trends in the political, historical and social area and their impact on the arts and literature are addressed in the lectures. For all these topics, various national settings (France, Germany, Italy and Spain) are examined and discussed. The lecture series seeks to establish a comparative perspective on the relevant issues.

France 1945-date

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 2

Relevant works of literature, film, theatre and the press are studied in French, wherever possible. Written and oral material is drawn from a wide range of sources to make you aware of the context in which France has progressed towards its current situation. You will develop essential skills of note-taking, discussing, summarising, analysing and essay writing (including documentation). The module will allow you to progress towards independent study.

Spain 1945-date

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 2

Relevant works of literature, film, theatre and the press are studied in Spanish, wherever possible. Written and oral material is drawn from a wide range of sources to make you aware of the context in which Spain has progressed towards its current situation. You will develop essential skills of note-taking, discussing, summarising, analysing and essay writing (including documentation). The module will allow you to progress towards independent study.

Spanish 2A

15 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 2

Your knowledge of syntax will be revised and progressed and active knowledge of lexis increased. Speaking, listening, reading and written skills will be raised to a higher level through the study of authentic texts taken from a variety of media. The study of relevant current affairs will be an important element of the module.

Spanish 2B

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 2

Your knowledge of syntax and lexis will continue to be enhanced alongside the skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing. Practical aspects of living, studying and working abroad will be covered, including history, geography, politics, society, culture and literature.

Spanish Post-Intensive A

15 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 2

Your knowledge of syntax will be revised and progressed and active knowledge of lexis increased. Speaking, listening, reading and writing skills will be raised to a higher level through the study of authentic texts taken from a variety of media. The study of relevant current affairs will be an important element of the module.

Spanish Post-Intensive B

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 2

Knowledge of syntax and lexis will continue to be enhanced alongside the skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing. Practical aspects of living, studying and working abroad will be covered, including aspects of the history, geography, politics, society, culture and literature.

Europe Mandatory Year Abroad - Modern Languages

120 credits
Autumn & spring teaching, Year 3

During the year aboard you immerse yourself in the culture of one (typically, but occasionally two) of the languages you are studying. You will follow appropriate modules in a partner university where the relevant language is spoken. You are required to accumulate a minimum number of credits by passing approved modules in order to satisfy the assessment criteria of the year abroad.

An alternative mode is to take a post, obtained through the offices of the British Council, as an English language teaching assistant in a school, normally (but not necessarily) in continental Europe. You are assessed on the basis of two items of written work, namely a pedagogic report (in the language of the school destination) and a dissertation (in your second target language, where applicable), which are marked at Sussex. In some instances you may undertake a different kind of approved work placement, in which case the pedagogic report is replaced by a work report. Where your subject permits and the opportunity arises the year abroad may be assessed on the basis of a mixture of modulework and report or modulework and dissertation.

The nature of the learning experience can differ markedly. You may attend 20 taught hours-per-week at a university in Madrid or teach 12 hours of English per-week in a provincial French lycee. In both cases, you will be self-reliant for your learning, but you will still be able to count upon support from the International and Study Abroad Office and the subject departments at Sussex. That support initially takes the form of a number of preparatory workshops provided at Sussex in the course of your second year.

The overall aim of the year abroad is to improve the your proficiency in the taught language(s) by extended exposure to the authentic contemporary language in all its forms, whilst also refining the your cultural awareness and enhancing your general communication skills.

French 3B

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 4

The final year core language modules seek to build upon the learning of the three previous years, refining the your skills in both receptive and productive functions. Informal interactions in the classroom setting will reinforce oral proficiency and lead into more formal discussions and debates. These in turn will underpin written proficiency, whether you are writing freely within the framework of a discursive essay or responding specifically to other stimuli in French, such as texts or audio-visual materials. In particular, you will be introduced to the practical techniques of translating and interpreting, the objective being that you should gain both a useful additional skill and an insight into what it might be like to work as a professional linguist.

Spanish 3B

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 4

The final year core language modules seek to build upon the learning of the three previous years, refining your skills in both receptive and productive functions. Informal interactions in the classroom setting will reinforce oral proficiency and lead into more formal discussions and debates. These in turn will underpin written proficiency, whether you are writing freely within the framework of a discursive essay, or responding specifically to other stimuli in the TL, such as texts or audio-visual materials. In particular, you will be introduced to the practical techniques of translating and interpreting, the objective being that they should gain both a useful additional skill and an insight into what it might be like to work as a professional linguist.

French Special Subject 1

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 4

This module, delivered in French to all single-honours and joint-major students studying French as part of their degree, will address some key works by two of the most significant writers in 20th-century French literature, namely Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone deBeauvoir. The texts themselves may vary from year to year, but they will normally include at least one notable exemplar of the theatre, prose fiction, biography and/or autobiography, and the discursive or polemical essay (whether literary, political, philosophical or sociological in theme). A prime focus of analysis will be the manner in which this famous existentialist couple transposed their lived experience – and, to an extent, their own relationship – into a plethora of literary forms.

French Special Subject 2

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 4

This special subject module, which is taught and assessed in French, comprises two complementary parts. The first will trace the history of the cinema in France from its inception in the 1890s to the 'New Wave' of the post-war years, via selected landmarks such as: the heyday of the silent era; the industrialisation of the cinema; the impacts of aesthetic movements (the avant-garde, impressionism and surrealism); the shock of the talkies; the seventh art under German occupation; and the creation of the 'New Wave'. The second part will critique the work of outstanding French directors such as Bunuel, Renoir, Truffaut and Godard, with particular emphasis upon innovation both in thematic preoccupations and cinematic technique.

Spanish Special Subject 1

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 4

This module, delivered in Spanish to all single-honours and joint-major students studying Spanish as part of their degree, will address some key works by some of the most significant novelists in 20th-century Spanish literature. The texts themselves may vary from year to year, but they will normally include a faithful and consistent representation of the Realism genre in the 20th century. A prime focus of analysis will be the manner in which the novel deals with a vast number of Spanish social problems and from different perspectives, in accordance with the literary generations' changing mindsets.

Spanish Special Subject 2

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 4

This special subject module, delivered and assessed in Spanish, is concerned with the rise of the Spanish film industry on the global stage, especially since the advent of democracy in the country. In this period, a number of directors (notably Amenabar and Almodovar), actors and films have become emblematic of Spanish culture and society. This module will explore the role that Spanish cinema has played in the fight for freedom of speech, sexual equality, and coming to terms with a recent brutal past. You will therefore gain a critical perspective on many aspects of the evolution of Spanish culture from the end of the Civil War to the end of the Franco dictatorship and into the era of Spanish democracy. The specific movies, whose themes will be studied within the contexts both of Spanish cinema and of the international film industry, may vary from time to time but will typically include such works as "Mar adentro" (2004), "Volver" (2006) and "Lope" (2010).

Back to module list

Key facts

  • enhance your employability: more than 80 per cent of employers surveyed said they actively sought graduates who had studied abroad (QS Global Employer Survey Report 2011)
  • one of the best-supported study abroad programmes in the UK
  • develop an international perspective at an overseas university in Asia, Australia, Europe or North, Central and South America 

Visit International and Study Abroad: Destinations

Career benefits of studying abroad

Studying abroad makes you stand out from other students when entering the job market. Following a period living and studying abroad, you will return with increased confidence and independence, adept at problemsolving and decision-making. You will have made a new network of friends and may have improved your current language skills or learnt a new language. Employers highly rate these skills as they can be applied in today’s global career paths.

Sussex recognises the value of language skills in preparing its students to become global citizens: as well as our dual-language courses (vist the Languages subject area), we offer students in most subjects the opportunity to take language electives as part of their single-honours courses (visit Sussex Choice: make the most of your course).

After studying abroad, some of our graduates have gone on to careers as translators • sales and marketing professionals • international recruitment consultants • Refugee Projects co-ordinator for the British Red Cross abroad • a CNN presenter • international mortgage administrators • teachers of English in Venezuela, Spain, Germany, Japan and France.

We offer a huge range of destinations across Asia, Australia, Europe, and North, Central and South America. 

Erasmus+

Erasmus +We offer one of the best-supported European study abroad programmes of any UK university. Pioneered independently by Sussex in the 1960s, our study abroad scheme is supported by the European Commission through Erasmus+. Students on this programme usually benefit from nonmeans- tested grants. 

Visit British Council: Erasmus

Study abroad duration and destinations

If you are taking a course with an American Studies component, a dual-language course, or one of our joint courses involving a language, you spend Year 3 of your four-year course abroad. Students from most other courses can apply to do a study-abroad period during their degree. 

View our course listings at Undergraduate study

American Studies students study at one of a range of universities across North America. Language-degree students study at a university in Europe (or La Réunion or Québec, Canada, for French, and Latin America for Spanish) where their language of study is spoken. Language students can also apply to the language assistant scheme managed by the British Council for their year abroad.

Visit British Council: Language assistants

A growing number of overseas universities now have courses taught in English, which enables Sussex students without the necessary language skills to study abroad. Students can also take Erasmus Intensive Language Courses in-country before their term starts.

The University is increasing the opportunities for students to go on short-term non-credit-bearing Summer Schools overseas. In 2013, a number of students benefitted from summer programmes in China and Hong Kong.

For more information on study abroad opportunities, email sussexabroad@sussex.ac.uk

Visit Study abroad for Sussex students

Entry requirements

Sussex welcomes applications from students of all ages who show evidence of the academic maturity and broad educational background that suggests readiness to study at degree level. For most students, this will mean formal public examinations; details of some of the most common qualifications we accept are shown below. If you are an overseas student, refer to Applicants from outside the UK.

All teaching at Sussex is in the English language. If your first language is not English, you will also need to demonstrate that you meet our English language requirements.

A level

Typical offer: ABB

Specific entry requirements: A levels must include French, at grade B. For applicants with only French at A level, Spanish can be taken from beginner's level, but all successful applicants will need A level French (grade B).

International Baccalaureate

Typical offer: 34 points overall

Specific entry requirements: Successful applicants will need Higher Level French, with at least grade 5. Spanish can be taken from beginner's level, but all successful applicants must have prior knowledge of French to Higher Level (grade 5).

For more information refer to International Baccalaureate.

Access to HE Diploma

Typical offer: Pass the Access to HE Diploma with at least 45 credits at Level 3, of which 30 credits must be at Distinction and 15 credits at Merit or higher.

Specific entry requirements: Successful applicants will also need A level French (or equivalent), at grade B. For applicants with only French at A level, Spanish can be taken from beginner's level, but all successful applicants will need A level standard French (grade B).

For more information refer to Access to HE Diploma.

Advanced Diploma

Typical offer: Pass with grade B in the Diploma and A in the Additional and Specialist Learning.

Specific entry requirements: The Additional and Specialist Learning must be an A-level in French. For applicants with only French at A level, Spanish can be taken from beginner's level, but all successful applicants must have A level standard French (at grade B).

For more information refer to Advanced Diploma.

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma

Typical offer: DDM

Specific entry requirements: In addition to the BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma, successful applicants will also need A level (or equivalent) French, grade B. For applicants with only French at A level, Spanish can be taken from beginner's level, but all successful applicants will need A level standard French (grade B).

For more information refer to BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma.

European Baccalaureate

Typical offer: Overall result of at least 77%

Specific entry requirements: Evidence of existing academic ability in French is essential. Spanish can be taken from beginner's level for those without prior experience. However, all successful applicants will need to have a good prior knowledge of French.

For more information refer to European Baccalaureate.

Finnish Ylioppilastutkinto

Typical offer: Overall average result in the final matriculation examinations of at least 6.0

Specific entry requirements: Evidence of existing academic ability in French is essential. Spanish can be taken from beginner's level for those without prior experience. However, all successful applicants will need to have a good prior knowledge of French.

French Baccalauréat

Typical offer: Overall final result of at least 13/20

Specific entry requirements: Spanish can be taken from beginner's level for those without prior experience.

German Abitur

Typical offer: Overall result of 2.0 or better

Specific entry requirements: Evidence of existing academic ability in French is essential. Spanish can be taken from beginner's level for those without prior experience. However, all successful applicants will need to have a good prior knowledge of French.

Irish Leaving Certificate (Higher level)

Typical offer: AABBBB

Specific entry requirements: Evidence of existing academic ability in French is essential. Spanish can be taken from beginner's level for those without prior experience. However, all successful applicants will need to have a good prior knowledge of French.

Italian Diploma di Maturità or Diploma Pass di Esame di Stato

Typical offer: Final Diploma mark of at least 81/100

Specific entry requirements: Evidence of existing academic ability in French (normally at least grade B in Higher French) is essential. Spanish can be taken from beginner's level for those without prior experience. However, all successful applicants will need to have a good prior knowledge of French.

Scottish Highers and Advanced Highers

Typical offer: AABBB

Specific entry requirements: Highers must include French, at least grade B. Ideally, applicants will have French at Advanced Higher, also grade B. Spanish can be taken from beginner's level, but all successful applicants need at least Higher French (grade B).

For more information refer to Scottish Highers and Advanced Highers.

Spanish Titulo de Bachillerato (LOGSE)

Typical offer: Overall average result of at least 8.0

Specific entry requirements: Evidence of existing academic ability in French is essential.

Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma

Typical offer: Pass the Core plus at least AB in two A-levels

Specific entry requirements: A levels must include French, grade B. For applicants with only French at A level, Spanish can be taken from beginner's level, but at least A level French is essential.

For more information refer to Welsh Baccalaureate.

English language requirements

IELTS 6.5 overall, with not less than 6.0 in each section. Pearson's Test of English (Academic) with 62 overall with at least 56 in all four skills.

For more information, refer to alternative English language requirements.

For more information about the admissions process at Sussex, contact:

Undergraduate Admissions,
Sussex House,
University of Sussex, Falmer,
Brighton BN1 9RH, UK
T +44 (0)1273 678416
F +44 (0)1273 678545
E ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk

Fees and funding

Fees

Home/EU students: £9,000 per year1
Channel Island and Isle of Man students: £9,000 per year2
Overseas students: £13,750 per year3

1 The fee shown is for the academic year 2014.
2 The fee shown is for the academic year 2014.
3 The fee shown is for the academic year 2014.

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Scholarships

The scholarships listed below are for the subject area you are viewing and may not apply to all degrees listed within it. Please check the description of the individual funding source to make sure it is relevant to your chosen degree.

Visit Undergraduate scholarships 2015

Visit Part-time work

Care Leavers Award (2015)

Region: UK
Level: UG

For students who have been in care before starting at Sussex.

First-Generation Scholars Scheme (2015)

Region: UK
Level: UG

For students from relatively low income families – ie those whose family income is less than £42,620 per annum.

Sussex Excellence Scholarship (2015)

Region: UK, Europe (Non UK), International (Non UK/EU)
Level: UG

A merit-based scholarship for undergraduate students.

Careers and profiles

Recent destinations of our graduates include: Amnesty International Red Cross Sony Headstar • DeHavilland News • Imperial College, London • Keble College, Oxford

Employers will value your communication and language skills, not to mention the maturity and life experience gained during your year abroad. More than 80 per cent of employers surveyed said they actively sought graduates who had studied abroad (QS Global Employer Survey Report 2011). 

Careers that are open to our graduates include: arts and the media • journalism and publishing • business and marketing • commerce and finance • civil and diplomatic services • the institutions of the European Union • public service and politics • teaching and academia. 

Visit Sussex Centre for Language Studies: career resources and opportunities

Careers and employability

For employers, it’s not so much what you know, but what you can do with your knowledge that counts. The experience and skills you’ll acquire during and beyond your studies will make you an attractive prospect. Initiatives such as SussexPlus, delivered by the Careers and Employability Centre, help you turn your skills to your career advantage. It’s good to know that 92 per cent of our graduates are in work or further study (Which? University).

Visit Your career and employability plan

Rebecca's student perspective

Rebecca Loxton

‘Sussex is a wonderful place to study languages and the facilities of the Language Learning Centre really allow you to develop your skills and fluency.

‘One of the things that attracted me to Sussex was the large number of destinations on offer in which to spend your year abroad. My year abroad in Paris was unforgettable and I’m planning on using the language skills and cultural awareness I’ve gained during my degree to work abroad in the future.

‘The feeling of mastering a foreign language is incredibly satisfying – languages set you apart from other graduates, are relevant to almost any job and employers love them! And the lovely thing about languages at Sussex is the chance to do in-depth academic work while gaining a skill at the same time.’

Rebecca Loxton
Languages student

Life in our School

Sussex Centre for Language Studies

The Sussex Centre for Language Studies has a digital language laboratory and multimedia workstations for private study of over sixty world languages, and its highly qualified and experienced staff will make your learning experience relaxed but structured. Our Centre offers degrees and electives in modern languages, as well as options in English language and an English Language Teaching pathway.

Contact us

Sussex Centre for Language Studies,
University of Sussex, Falmer,
Brighton BN1 9SH, UK
E languages@sussex.ac.uk
T +44 (0)1273 877258
F +44 (0)1273 678476

Find out more at the Sussex Centre for Language Studies

Our Director, Professor Ray Satchell

Professor Ray Satchell

'Our staff are passionate about all aspects of language, language teaching and language learning. We believe that learning to speak a second or third language provides a window into a culture other than our own, and that cultural awareness and intercultural communication are essential for the promotion of peace and understanding in the world today. In addition, the study of a language gives access to the media, films and literature in the new language, opening up many intriguing paths of discovery. 

'The Centre is responsible for undergraduate degrees in modern languages, and English Language Teaching programmes at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. We also recognise that students from disciplines across the University will, as future global citizens, travel, live and work across the world. For this reason we have developed a flexible portfolio of language electives which you can take as part of your degree. You can also study autonomously in our Language Learning Centre, which has a digital language suite and multimedia workstations for the private study of over fifty world languages.'

Professor Ray Satchell
Director of the Sussex Centre for Language Studies

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Open Days

Friday 5 September 2014
Saturday 4 October 2014

Open Days offer you the chance to speak one to one with our world-leading academic staff, find out more about our courses, tour specialist facilities, explore campus, visit student accommodation, and much more. Booking is required.

Book your place at Visit us and Open Days

Campus tours

Not able to attend one of our Open Days? Book on to one of our weekly guided campus tours.

Mature-student information session

If you are 21 or over, and thinking about starting an undergraduate degree at Sussex, you may want to attend one of our mature- student information sessions. Running between October and December, they include guidance on how to approach your application, finance and welfare advice, plus a guided campus tour with one of our current mature students.

Self-guided visits

If you are unable to make any of the visit opportunities listed, drop in Monday to Friday, year round, and collect a self-guided tour pack from Sussex House reception.

Book your place at Visit us and Open Days

Overseas visits

Meet with Sussex staff in your country at exhibitions, visits to schools and universities, and at a wide range of other events. Forthcoming visits are planned all over the world:

Bahrain • Brazil • Brunei • Canada • China • Colombia • France • Germany • Ghana • Greece • Hong Kong • India • Indonesia • Iraq • Italy • Japan • Kenya • Kuwait • Malaysia • Mexico • Nigeria • Norway • Pakistan • Qatar • Saudi Arabia • Singapore • South Korea • Spain • Sri Lanka • Taiwan • Thailand • Turkey • UAE • USA • Vietnam.

In-country representatives

In the International Office, we manage a network of overseas representatives who have been trained to support international students with their application to study at the University. Services representatives provide can include pre-departure information, support in submitting your housing application and advice regarding applying for a UK Student Visa.

Find out more about our overseas visits and in-country representatives

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