Sexual Dissidence MA

Key information

Duration:
1 year full time, 2 years part time
Start date:
September 2018
Apply by:
1 August (International), 1 September (UK/EU)

Learn to bring a radical, contemporary and global approach to the study of sexuality with our unique, interdisciplinary MA in queer studies. 

Jointly taught by the Schools of English and Global Studies – both ranked in the top 100 in the world (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017) – it provides a firm foundation in queer theory and allows you to tailor your studies to your interests.

Since 1991, this course has brought together dynamic, engaged students and faculty to develop cutting-edge work on sexuality. The MA is associated with the Centre for the Study of Sexual Dissidence, a research hub for sexuality and queer studies.

Why choose this course?

  • Our course offers an interdisciplinary and contemporary programme, addressing present-day issues of sexuality within a global context.
  • You'll be associated with an active research hub, the Centre for the Study of Sexual Dissidence, so you get to participate in regular research and arts events and connect with faculty and students that care about issues of gender and sexuality.
  • Brighton is a city known for its vibrant activist, queer, and arts scenes, and is near London, so you can enrich your studies by exploring nearby events and communities.
The big thing about queer theory is that when it’s done right, there’s no excuse for lazy thinking. Nothing can be assumed.”Michael Rowland
Sexual Dissidence MA
School of English PhD research student

Entry requirements

Degree requirements

You should normally have an upper second-class (2.1) undergraduate honours degree or above. 

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please select your country from the list.

Argentina

Degree requirements

Licenciado/Titulo with a final mark of 7.5-8.5 depending on your university. 

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Australia

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with second-class upper division.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Azerbaijan

Degree requirements

Magistr or Specialist Diploma with a minimum average mark of at least 4 or 81%

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Bahrain

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA 3.0/4.0 (Grade B).

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Bangladesh

Degree requirements

Masters degree with CGPA of at least 3.0/4.0.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Brazil

Degree requirements

Bacharel, Licenciado or professional title with a final mark of at least 7.5 or 8 depending on your university.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Brunei

Degree requirements

Bachelors (Honours) degree with GPA 4.0/5.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Canada

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA 3.3/4.0 (grade B+).

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Chile

Degree requirements

Licenciado with a final mark of 5-5.5/7 depending on your university.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

China

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree from a leading university with overall mark of 75%-85% depending on your university.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Colombia

Degree requirements

Licenciado with ‘Acreditacion de alta calidad' and a GPA of 3.5.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Cyprus

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree or Ptychion with a final mark of at least 7.5.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Ecuador

Degree requirements

Licenciado with a final mark of at least 17/20.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Egypt

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree from a university with an overall grade of 75%

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

France

Degree requirements

Licence with mention bien or Maîtrise with final mark of at least 13.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Germany

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree or Magister Artium with a final mark of 2.4 or better.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Ghana

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree from a public university with second-class upper division.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Greece

Degree requirements

Ptychion from an AEI with a final mark of at least 7.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hong Kong

Degree requirements

Bachelors (Honours) degree with second-class upper division.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

India

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree from a leading institution with overall mark of 55-70% depending on your university.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Indonesia

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with GPA 3.5/4.0.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Iran

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree (Licence or Karshenasi) with a final mark of at least 15.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Italy

Degree requirements

Diploma di Laurea with an overall mark of at least 105.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Japan

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with a minimum C/GPA of at least 3.0/4.0 or equivalent.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Jordan

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA of at least 3.0/4.0.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Kazakhstan

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with an overall mark of 4 or better (on a scale of 1-5)/GPA 3,33.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Kenya

Degree requirements

Bachelors (Honours) degree with second-class upper division.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Kuwait

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA of at least 3.0/4.0 or B+

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Lebanon

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA 3.5/4.0 or 14/20.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Malawi

Degree requirements

Masters degree, depending on your university.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Malaysia

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA of at least 3.3/4.0 or B+

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Mexico

Degree requirements

Licenciado with a final mark of at least 8.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Nepal

Degree requirements

Masters degree with overall mark of 80%

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Nigeria

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with second-class upper division or CGPA of at least 3.5/5.0.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Norway

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with an overall grade of B.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Oman

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA of at least 3.3/4.0.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Pakistan

Degree requirements

Four-year bachelors degree with overall grade of 65% or Masters with 60%

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Palestine

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with GPA of at least 3.5/4.0 or B+

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Paraguay

Degree requirements

Bachelors with a final mark of at least 7.5/10.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Peru

Degree requirements

Licenciado with a final mark of 14/20 depending on your university.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Philippines

Degree requirements

Masters degree with 'very good' overall, or equivalent depending on your university.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Qatar

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with an overall CPGA of at least 3 (on a scale of 4).

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Russia

Degree requirements

Magistr or Specialist Diploma with a minimum average mark of at least 4.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Saudi Arabia

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with a CGPA 3.5/5.0 or 3/4.0.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Singapore

Degree requirements

Bachelors (Honours) degree with second-class upper division or CAP 4.0.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

South Africa

Degree requirements

Bachelors (honours) degree with second-class division 1.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

South Korea

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree from a leading university with CGPA of at least 3.5/4.0 or B+

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Spain

Degree requirements

Licenciado with a final mark of at least 2/4.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Sri Lanka

Degree requirements

Bachelors Special degree with upper second honours.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Switzerland

Degree requirements

Licence or Diplôme with 5/6 or 8/10.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Taiwan

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with overall mark of 70%-85% depending on your university.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Thailand

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA of at least 3.0/4.0 or equivalent.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Turkey

Degree requirements

Lisans Diplomasi with CGPA of at least 3.0/4.0 or equivalent depending on your university.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

United Arab Emirates

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA of at least 3.0/4.0 or equivalent.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

USA

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA 3.3-3.5/4.0 depending on your university.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Vietnam

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree (with a Graduate Thesis/research component) with CGPA of at least 3.3/4.0 or 7.5/10.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Zambia

Degree requirements

Masters degree with GPA of 2.0/2.5 or equivalent.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Zimbabwe

Degree requirements

Bachelors (Honours) degree with second-class upper division.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

My country is not listed

If your country is not listed, you need to contact us and find out the qualification level you should have for this course. Contact us at pg.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification should typically be in a subject relevant to your chosen Masters course. You may also be considered for the course if you have other professional qualifications or experience of equivalent standing.

English language requirements

IELTS (Academic)

Higher level (7.0 overall, including at least 6.5 in each component).

Check your IELTS qualification meets all of our entry requirements and find out more about IELTS

Alternative English language qualifications

Proficiency tests

Cambridge Advanced Certificate in English (CAE)

For tests taken before January 2015: grade B or above.

For tests taken after January 2015: 185 overall, including at least 176 in each skill

We would normally expect the CAE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Advanced

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE)

For tests taken before January 2015: grade C or above.

For tests taken after January 2015: 185 overall, including at least 176 in each skill.

We would normally expect the CPE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Proficiency

Pearson (PTE Academic)

67 overall, including at least 62 in all four skills.

PTE (Academic) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Pearson (PTE Academic)

TOEFL (iBT)

95 overall, including at least 22 in Listening, 23 in Reading, 23 in Speaking, 24 in Writing.

TOEFL (iBT) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about TOEFL (iBT)

The TOEFL Institution Code for the University of Sussex is 9166.

English language qualifications

AS/A-level (GCE)

Grade C or above in English Language.

Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination (HKALE)/ AS or A Level: grade C or above in Use of English.

French Baccalaureat

A score of 12 or above in English.

GCE O-level

Grade C or above in English.

Brunei/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

Singapore/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

GCSE or IGCSE

Grade C or above in English as a First Language.

Grade B or above in English as a Second Language.

German Abitur

A score of 12 or above in English.

Ghana Senior Secondary School Certificate

If awarded before 1993: grades 1-6 in English language.

If awarded between 1993 and 2005: grades A-D in English language

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE)

Level 5, including at least 4 in each component in English Language.

Indian School Certificate (Standard XII)

The Indian School Certificate is accepted at the grades below when awarded by the following examination boards:

Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) – English Core only: 80%

Council for Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE) - English: 80%

International Baccalaureate Diploma (IB)

English A or English B at grade 5 or above.

Irish Leaving Certificate

Grade C (Honours) or above in English.

Malaysian Certificate of Education (SPM) 119/GCE O-level

If taken before the end of 2008: grades 1-5 in English Language.

If taken from 2009 onwards: grade C or above in English Language.

The qualification must be jointly awarded by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES).

West African Senior School Certificate

Grades 1-6 in English language when awarded by the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) or the National Examinations Council (NECO).

English language support

If you don’t meet the English language requirements for your degree, you may be able to take a pre-sessional course.

Visas and immigration

Find out how to apply for a student visa

Admissions information for applicants

How to apply

You apply to Sussex using our postgraduate application system

Personal statementYes

A personal statement is a piece of writing that you submit as part of your application. It should show us that you are the right person for Sussex by telling us why you want to study your course. 

Find out how to write a personal statement

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email pg.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk

Application deadlines

1 August (International), 1 September (UK/EU)

Course details

Full-time and part-time study

Choose to study this course full time or part time, to fit around your work and family life. 

Full-time course

You take four taught modules, two in the autumn term and two in the spring term. In the autumn term, you take Critical Issues in Queer Theory. In the spring term, you take at least one of Global Queer or Sexuality and Development: Intimacies, Health and Rights in Global Perspective. You also choose from a range of options. In the summer, you prepare and write your 15,000-word dissertation.

Part-time course

You take one taught module per term in the autumn and spring terms of Year 1 and 2. In the autumn term of Year 1, you take Critical Issues in Queer Theory. In the spring term of Year 1, you choose one of Global Queer or Sexuality and Development: Intimacies, Health and Rights in Global Perspective. In Year 2, choose from a range of options. You prepare and write your 15,000-word dissertation across two summers. For details about the part-time course, contact us at sexualdissidence@sussex.ac.uk

How will I study?

You'll study core modules and options. You can also attend research and arts events, such as our film club, reading group and visiting speaker series. Over the summer, you work on your supervised dissertation.

Modules

Core modules

Core modules are taken by all students on the course. They give you a solid grounding in your chosen subject and prepare you to explore the topics that interest you most.

Options

Alongside your core modules, you can choose options to broaden your horizons and tailor your course to your interests.

Please note

If you’re receiving – or applying for – USA federal Direct Loan funds, you can’t undertake your placement/internship in the USA. Find out more about American Student Loans and Federal Student Aid 

Our experts

Dr Paul Boyce

Dr Paul Boyce

Senior Lecturer in Anthropology and Inteal Development

Research interests

Anthropology and Queer Theory in India, Anthropology of Sexualities, Anthropology of the Body, Applied Anthropology, Bioavailability, HIV prevention research, International Development, Intimacy, Male and Transgender Sex Work, Male Sex work in SE Africa, Psycho-social and Psychoanalytic perspectives in Anthropology, Queer and Transgender Representation, Queer Theory, Sexual and gendered subjectivities, Sexuality and Law in Nepal, Visual Anthropology and Media

View Paul Boyce's profile

Dr Natalia Cecire

Lecturer in English & American Literature

Research interests

American Studies, English and American literature, Feminist theory, History and Philosophy of Science, Modern and contemporary American poetry

View Natalia Cecire's profile

Prof Andrea Cornwall

Prof Andrea Cornwall

Professor of Anthropology and International Development

Research interests

Brazil, democratisation, Empowerment, gender and development, Gender and Sexuality, Nigeria, participation, public engagement, Public health

View Andrea Cornwall's profile

Dr Katherine Farrimond

Dr Katherine Farrimond

Lecturer in Media and Cultural Studies

Research interests

crime fictions, cultural studies, Feminist theory, Film, film noir, Gender and Sexuality, genre, girlhood, Gothic, horror, Media, Nostalgia, popular culture, representation, retro and vintage, science fiction, television, The body, virginity

View Katherine Farrimond's profile

Dr Catherine Grant

Dr Catherine Grant

Research interests

Audiovisual Essay, creative and critical practice, digital media, Film-based media (History, Theory & Practice), Found Footage Film, Gender and Sexuality, Hispanic, Portguese & Latin Studies, Media & Communication Studies, Media and film, Multimedia - video, psychoanalytic object relations theory, Publishing, Videographic Criticism

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Dr Michael Lawrence

Dr Michael Lawrence

Reader

Research interests

Adaptation, animals and media, Bollywood, children and film, indian cinema, Stars and performance

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Dr Alisa Lebow

Dr Alisa Lebow

Reader In Film Studies

Research interests

Activism and Documentary, Documentary theory and practice, Experimental Documentary, First Person Film, Jewish Culture and Film, Queer and Transgender Representation, Revolution and Film, Turkish and Middle Eastern Documentary

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Dr Sharif Mowlabocus

Dr Sharif Mowlabocus

Senior Lecturer Of Media Studies/DigitalMedia

Research interests

'race' and class, Critical Digital Humanities, Digital Culture, digital embodiment, digital media, E-Health, Embodiment and Technologies, Gay & Lesbian Studies, Gender and Sexuality, Human Touch for ICT, Ideas of pornography, M-Health, Media & Communication Studies, Mobile Apps, Pornography, Queer and Transgender Representation, Queer Theory, representation

View Sharif Mowlabocus's profile

Dr Rachel O'Connell

Lecturer In Post 1350 English Literature

Research interests

disability, Gender And Sexuality Studies, Queer studies, Queer Theory

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Prof Kate O'Riordan

Prof Kate O'Riordan

Professor of Digital Culture

Research interests

Biodigital Life, Bioinformatics, Critical Digital Humanities, Digital Arts History, Theory and Practice, Digital Culture, digital media, Feminist and qualitative research methods, Feminist theory, Genomics, Media & Communication Studies, Post-digital, Queer studies, Research Ethics, Science Studies

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Dr Tanya Palmer

Dr Tanya Palmer

Lecturer in Law

Research interests

Criminal law and criminal justice, Criminal law theory, Embodiment, feminist perspectives on law, Feminist theory, gender, Gender and Sexuality, gender-based violence, Research design and methodology, Sexual and gendered subjectivities, sexual violence, Socio Legal Studies

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Prof Alison Phipps

Prof Alison Phipps

Professor of Gender Studies

Research interests

Feminist theory, Gender and Sexuality, higher education, Laddism, neoliberalism, political sociology, Rape, Reproductive Justice, Sex industry, Sex work, Sexual harassment, sexual violence

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Dr Jason Price

Dr Jason Price

Senior Lecturer in Contemporary Theatre and Performance

Research interests

Activist Performance, Aesthetics and Politics, Comedy, Contemporary Theatre, Dramaturgy, Marxism, Performance Histories, popular culture, Popular Theatre, Puppet Forms, Site-Specific and Public Art, Theatre and Community

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Prof Lucy Robinson

Prof Lucy Robinson

Professor in Collaborative History

Research interests

Alternative Spiritualities/New Religious Movements, British party politics, Cultural History, Digital history, Economic And Social History, Gender and Sexuality, Memory, pedagogy, Popular Music, Social identities, Trauma, War and the media, War Studies, Youth

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Dr Luke Robinson

Dr Luke Robinson

Lecturer In Film Studies

Research interests

Chinese-language cinema, Documentary theory and practice, East Asian cultural studies, Film History, Theory and Criticism, Queer studies, Transnational cinema

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Dr Samuel Solomon

Dr Samuel Solomon

Lecturer in Creative and Critical Writing

Research interests

Contemporary Poetry, Creative and critical writing, Feminist theory, Gender and Sexuality, Literary And Cultural Theory, Marxism, Modernist and contemporary writing, Print Culture

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Dr Bethan Stevens

Dr Bethan Stevens

Lecturer in English and Creative & Critical Writing

Research interests

Book Illustration, Creative and critical writing, Historical Fiction, Modernism, Museum Studies, popular culture, The History of Printmaking, The Long Nineteenth Century, The Novel, The Short Story, Victorian culture, Word and Image Theory

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Ms Lizzie Thynne

Ms Lizzie Thynne

Reader in Film

Research interests

art cinema, contemporary television, Cultural and Critical Theory, Documentary theory and practice, Experimental Documentary, Feminist Art History, Film drama, Gay & Lesbian Studies, Gender and Sexuality, Life writing, Queer studies, Television History, Theory and Criticism, Visual fields, women's liberation

View Lizzie Thynne's profile

Dr Francesco Ventrella

Dr Francesco Ventrella

Lecturer in Art History

Research interests

20th Century Visual Culture, Affect Theory, Art Historiography, Art Theory & Aesthetics, Critical Theory, Cultural History, Feminist Art History, Gender and Sexuality, Modernism, Queer studies, Visual and Material Culture, Visual perception in the 19th century

View Francesco Ventrella's profile

Dr Mark Walters

Dr Mark Walters

Reader in Criminal Law and CriminalJustice

Research interests

Criminal justice reform, Criminal law and criminal justice, Criminology, hate crime, Restorative justice, sexual violence

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Prof Cynthia Weber

Prof Cynthia Weber

Professor of International Relations

Research interests

American Studies, citizenship, Critical Gender Studies, Feminist International Relations, Film and International Relations, Intervention, Poststructuralist International Relations, Queer International Relations, Sovereignty

View Cynthia Weber's profile

Course enquiries

+44 (0)1273 877303
sexualdissidence@sussex.ac.uk

Find out about the School of English  
Find out about the Centre for the Study of Sexual Dissidence
Find us onTwitter @SexDissSussex

Fees and scholarships

How much does it cost?

Fees

UK/EU students:
£7,900 per year
Channel Islands and Isle of Man students:
£7,900 per year
International students:
£15,500 per year

Note that your fees may be subject to an increase on an annual basis.

If you’re studying part time over two years, you’ll be charged 50% of the equivalent 2018 full-time fee in each year of study. The fee in your second year – if you continue your studies without a break – will be subject to a 2.5% increase (subject to rounding).

Living costs

Find out typical living costs for studying at Sussex

How can I fund my course?

Postgraduate Masters loans

You can borrow up to £10,280 to help with fees and living costs if your course starts on or after 1 August 2017. Loans are available from the Student Loans Company if you’re from the UK or if you’re an EU national studying for a Masters.

Find out more about Postgraduate Masters Loans

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

How Masters scholarships make studying more affordable

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Careers

The MA is relevant to number of career directions, including:

  • policy, activism and international development, such as research and interventions in sexuality, rights and health
  • academic research related to queer studies in a wide range of fields, including literature, cultural studies, media studies, film studies, development, international relations and anthropology
  • teaching, including in higher education
  • media, writing and the arts, in particular queer representation, difference and diversity.

Graduate destinations

93% of students from the School of English were in work or further study six months after graduating. Our students have gone on to jobs including:

  • publications controller, Oxford University Press
  • web content developer, The British Library
  • bookshop manager, Waterstones.

(EPI, Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015 for postgraduates)

Critical Issues in Queer Theory

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1 credits

Queer theory and/or queer studies, which first emerged in the late 1980s and early 1990s, brings poststructuralist epistemologies and radical political sensibilities to the social, cultural, and historical study of sexuality – and, indeed, the study of eroticism, relationality, and kinship more broadly.

This module provides you with the opportunity to gain an overview of key concepts and debates in queer theory and to read important queer theoretical texts in depth. We will discuss some foundational texts in queer theory and will explore some of the intellectual, social, cultural, and political contexts from which queer theory emerged in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

We will also explore a selection of key issues and approaches in contemporary queer studies, which might include:

  • transgender theories
  • affect studies
  • transnational contexts
  • theorisations of contemporary neoliberalism.

Throughout this module you will work to build up a theoretical foundation that will allow you to attend in nuanced and informed ways to the politics of sexuality, relationship, and kinship as these politics are manifested and remade in texts and other cultural artefacts.

Dissertation (English MA programmes)

  • 60 credits
  • Summer Teaching, Year 1 credits

This module gives you the opportunity to undertake supervised work on a dissertation of up to 20,000 words, on a topic of your choice agreed with your supervisor. If you are a part-time student, you will begin your background reading for the dissertation in the first summer term and vacation of your studies.

Bearing Witness: Terror and Trauma in Global Literature

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1 credits

The module explores the representation of terror, trauma and testimonial address in a range of contemporary international literary texts. Through a textual and contextual study of these works, key issues such as the non-narratability of trauma, the ethics of speaking for the other, the intersection between the politics of reading, writing and bearing witness, the creation of cross-cultural communities in the representation and reading of trauma, and the relationship between gender, intimacy and the representation of the body in pain, will be studied in relation to critical readings from terror and trauma studies.

The range of literary texts reflects the global cultural reach of the module, from postcolonial texts from a wide range of cultural locations to literatures that engage with critical discourses generated by the Holocaust and the War on Terror. Opening with an emphasis on cross-cultural connections and critical readings, the focus on historical positioning becomes more pronounced as the module proceeds.

Blackness, Innocence, Modernity

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1 credits

In this module you will theorise modernity’s deeply racialised encounters with the temporalities of innocence.

You historicise psychoanalytic and anthropological discourses of development in concepts of childhood, primitivism, and deferral.

You also examine how the production of innocence structures legal, epistemological, and aesthetic questions in U.S. literature and culture.

You will write a series of blog posts and a research essay.

Critical Reading in Advanced Gender Theory

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1 credits

You focus on independent reading and discussion which allows you to recap or extend your knowledge of feminist, gender and queer theory at advanced levels.

You do this through the following themes:

  • identity
  • sex
  • culture
  • speech
  • experience
  • violence
  • labour.

You are encouraged to follow a particular topic or analytical thread through the themes, which can form the framework of your term paper.

You will participate in a weekly workshop and in small group discussion exercises which will encourage you to communicate your learning and make connections across themes and topics.

Feminism and Film

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1 credits

The module begins with an exploration of the relationship between feminism, feminist theory and film theory, and feminist filmmaking.

Beginning from the assumption that feminism is first and foremost a politics, and its theories – its feminisms – must exist in that space, which Stuart Hall calls the ‘tension ... between ... political and intellectual concerns’, it traces a history, firstly of feminist film theory and criticism, and secondly of feminist film making.

In the first part, it explores issues of representation, asking what kinds of representations of women mainstream film constructs, how these representations function within wider social discourses and power structures, how film – through its representations – works to construct particular subject positions for its viewers, and how particular genres structure these positions differently through their specific play of realism, ideology and fantasy. In terms of a feminist film practice, it asks how far feminist film makers can intervene in film practices, and what such an intervention might/should look like.

In each session, a specific film text will be studied in the light of the theoretical issues raised.

Gender Politics and Social Research

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1 credits

This module approaches feminist theory and methodology at advanced levels, critically exploring feminist research on a number of different issues and engaging with the politics of the research process itself. As a core module on the MA in Gender Studies, it is intended to prepare you to conduct independent research and to produce your dissertation.

The first half of the module introduces different methodologies and methods, encouraging you to reflect critically on their strengths and weaknesses, and how feminists have used them in the service of political projects. In the second half of the module, you will design research projects on two case-study issues and attempt to operationalise key feminist theories.

Gender, Sexuality and Digital Culture

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1 credits

This module seeks to explore relationships between the 'hardness' of technology and the 'softness' of the body. Moving through cyber-feminism and cyber-queer studies to critiques of social networking and reconfigurations of space - both public and private - the module seeks to engage with the diverse range of connections made daily between gendered subjects and technologies of media production and reception.

The aim is to provide you with an array of critical approaches that will allow you to discuss, analyse and critique such connections at a depth commensurate with M-Level work. While popularly conceived as an opposition to the organic, the corporeal and the subjective, technologies of mediation are intrinsically linked to and indelibly marked by issues of embodiment just as our understanding of the body has historically been coded through technologies of media production and reception.

Hollywood deploys the post-organic as a means of expressing contemporary cultural anxieties, while mobile phones are being used as a platform for gendered software. Online, the digital divide cuts across more than just geographical lines providing a space for both the re-inscription and subversion of hegemonic masculinity in multiple ways. This module addresses intersections, advances and ecologies across an array of media technologies and associated practices and cultures.

Literature in the Institution: the university and the study of culture

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1 credits

We live, work and study in the midst of the large-scale transformation of education at local, national and international levels. A related (but not identicial) development is the growing, although certainly not new, 'crisis' of the humanities characterised by myriad explanations of just what it is that we do and by contentious justifications for just why do we do it. As students and scholars of literature and culture, we may wonder how these two interrelated phenomena came into being and what exactly the study of literatures and cultures can contribute to their resolution. This module will take on these questions through a range of approaches. We will consider the origins of the European research university and its connections to moral philosophy, the relatively recent development of the study of 'English' in the UK and its former colonies, the relationship between higher education and the 20th century welfare state, the uses of literary and cultural study as parts of social movements within and outside of the University, and contemporary debates about the privatisation and market-rationalisation of education.

The Renaissance Body

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1 credits

In early-modern England the body was a major intellectual preoccupation and a focal metaphor informing and shaping cultural structures and artefacts. This period, too, like the cusp of the 21st century, had a very distinctive conception of the person as a construct or artifice, as the product of social intervention and cultural organization. Engaging with interpretative models from the fascinating interdisciplinary field of cultural theory of the body, you will explore the aesthetics of embodiment through a range of literary and visual texts, unravelling the dense significance of the corporeal imagination of the Renaissance. Key themes include: body borders, the supernatural and society; gendered voices, sex and agency; the medical imagination; diabolic inversions (the witch's body); heroic and monstrous masculinities; transvestitism; mystical monarchy; diseased bodies; revolutionary corporealities; body, soul and mind; consuming bodies and eating communities; the fabricated body; and pornography.

Activism for Development and Social Justice

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

On this module, you will address the ways in which activists and activism have sought to engage in development and social justice. You'll explore and evaluate different approaches to activism, grounding this in theories of social mobilisation and citizenship, and will work through a series of practical examples, drawing on empirical material produced by anthropologists and others, to explore how activism has been used to address issues of development and social justice. In doing so, you will seek to build on the material introduced in previous terms on theories of social change and approaches to development and social justice, to explore how different kinds of activisms seek to bring about change.

The module will explore the contributions that imaginative, insurgent, disruptive and chaotic forms of social action have to make to development, and will cover a range of forms of collective action from the use of petitions and lobbying of representatives, to the use of the arts in "interrupting" everyday life to bring some of its elements into question, to mobilisation for protests and peaceful demonstrations, to non-violent direct action and info-activism.

Art History's Queer Stories

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

You will question the way art history and its institutions reproduce normative discourses about gender and sexual orientation.

Firstly, you will study how homosexuality was represented in 19th- and 20th-century visual culture, and how artists have worked within and against such representations.

Secondly, you'll explore theory such as feminist, queer and postcolonial as well as psychoanalysis to help understand how sexuality and other markers of difference, like race and class, appear in art history and visual culture.

You draw from a selection of ephemera, artwork, documents and “sticky objects” in Sussex and London collections to find your own ways to analyse representations of non-normative sexualities in the context of private and public spaces, archives, museums and galleries.

This module provides a forum for discussing queer visualities from the past and currently, taking into account the narratives of curators, the queering of collections and art activism.

Feminism, Law and Society

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

In this module you consider different feminist theories and understandings of the role of gender in society. You reflect upon the consequences of that role on the rules, principles and policies of that society.

The ambition of the module is to explore the extent to which sex and gender inform the rules of law so as to foster or undermine inequalities in society.

In exploring the contours of law as they are informed by gender considerations you also explore the relationship between law and society in the construction of gender and sexual identities.

The module uses traditional legal sources - cases, statutes, legal treatises on the subject - in addition to academic commentary and analysis from sociology, law, politics, philosophy and cultural studies. It will also be informed by developments in the politics of gender and by changes instigated by feminist, critical race, and queer theory.

Global Queer

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

The module seeks to provide you with a comprehensive and sophisticated appreciation of the importance of queer work and queer practices in world politics. These include knowledge of different approaches to queer theory and sexuality studies and how these bear on understandings of international relations theory and practices in world politics. The kinds of questions to be investigated are: What is 'queer' and how has 'queer' been understood and explained by the discipline of IR? How and in what ways are 'sexuality' and 'queer' constituted as domains of international political practice and mobilised so that they bear on questions of state and nation formation, war and peace, and global political economy? And how does the discipline of IR grapple with 'queer' and 'sexuality studies' work? Topics to be investigated include analysing how 'heteronormativity' and 'homonormativity' function in relation to questions of hegemony, nationalism, migration, military recruiting, military intervention and its justifications, and neoliberal development projects. We will also consider how 'queer trouble-making' - as a political practice in world politics and as a scholarly practice within the discipline of international relations - might begin to change the relationships amongst queer work, sexuality studies, and international relations.

New Configurations in Critical Theory

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

This module will explore a wide range of contemporary critical approaches that have emerged not only out of the influential work of 20th century philosophy, literary theory and psychoanalysis, but also from a variety of disciplinary quarters. Our investigations will be loosely mapped to four interrelated topics of literature, aesthetics, politics and science but comprise a number of pressing theoretical issues. These are: affect, biopolitics, 'life', impersonality, animality, the posthuman, the status of conceptual art, the earth, political ontology, the common and communism, new materialisms, science and the brain, networks and information, systems theory and complexity theory. Possible readings include the work of Deleuze, Guattari, Agamben, Badiou, Rancière, Esposito, Bennett, Malabou, Smithson or Luhmann.

Queer Literatures

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

You explore key ideas in contemporary queer theory alongside analysis of literary works.

You develop an up to date and in-depth understanding of key queer theoretical developments that may include: 

  • the queer child
  • queerness and temporality
  • queer affects
  • life writing
  • intersectionality and identity
  • queer negativity
  • queer utopianism
  • queerness and diaspora.

At the same time, you will consider diverse works of modern and contemporary literature that offer a range of perspectives on identity, race, nation, gender, and sexuality. Overall, the module will explore how to bring theoretical concepts into conversation with literary texts.

Queering Popular Culture

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

This module offers you the chance to explore lesbian, gay, bisexual and queer contributions to, and perspectives on, the key fields of popular culture, including film, television, the press, popular music, fashion and style. Topics for detailed study will include lesbian representation in mainstream television genres; cinematic homosexualities and their historical context; lesbian and gay 'community television'; contemporary lesbian and gay magazines and newspapers; queer pop from David Bowie to the Pet Shop Boys and beyond; sexuality and style politics; and the pleasures and problematics of camp.

You will investigate issues of representation, consumption and interpretation; unravel debates over stereotyping, subcultures and sensibilities; and ask whether a specifically 'queered' critique of the existing academic discourses used in the study of popular culture is conceptually feasible and/or politically desirable. You can expect to sharpen and deepen your skills in interdisciplinary cultural analysis, and there will be a particular emphasis on a self-reflexive examination of (y)our own popular cultural tastes and practices, exploring the connections and contradictions between theoretical accounts of popular images and forms and our experiential investments in them as consumers located in (or interested in) sexual minorities.

The approach on this module is unrepentantly interdisciplinary - there is no overarching theoretical model to which you will be obliged to subscribe. Students with or without backgrounds in cultural studies will be made equally welcome.

Sexuality and Development: Intimacies, Health and Rights in Global Perspective

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

The module will explore sexualities as sites of political contestation, claims to rights and intimate aspirations in context of global socio-economic transformations, international health and development practice. The module will bring together theoretical perspectives on sexual subjectivity and sexual life, worlds with a range of applied concerns relating to health, actvism and development policy, and programming internationally. In particular the module will examine ways in which 'dissident sexual subjects' have been imagined globally, often both included and marginalised in different domains, such as the community, the state and international policy fora.

Themes and issus addressed by the module will include:

  • Sexual subjectivities, intimate lives and global transformations
  • Heteronormativity in interntional development and health
  • HIV and AIDS: Epidemiology, anthropology and policy - contested engagements with sexual lives and 'key populations'
  • Citizenship, economies and queer abandonment
  • Sexuality, law and the state: Homonational contestations
  • UN agencies and (im)possible sexual subjects
  • Sexualities in transition: trans-subjectivites, trans-bodies and trans-nationalisms
  • Viral and virtual intimacies
  • Intimate economies: Sex work, sex and work
  • Collaborative action: working with NGOs on sexual rights and health
  • Creative engagement: visual ethnographic work on sexual life-worlds - globally
  • Advocacy and exclusions: Global dialogues, sexual rights, well-being and marginalisations 

Sexual life-worlds are increasingly interpreted in relation to global flows and transitions. One way in which connections between global processes and sexualities are becoming ever-more visible is in relation to new imaginaries of sexual identity and subjectivity, as mediated through transnational media, new communication technologies and the global momentum of neo-liberal capital. International development and heath practices are closely associated with such social processes as they seek to respond to the changing and enduring attributes of sexual lives, practices and risks in the context of wider concerns for well-being. The module will respond to such concerns and seek to equip you with both theoretical and practice based frameworks for engaging with a range of themes and issues related to sexuality and development.

The module will be interdisciplinary in focus, drawing more widely on literature from anthropology and the social sciences, international development, health, gender and sexuality studies. In particular the module will seek to explore a range of literatures comparatively, bringing theoretical perspectives on sexuality into dialogue with more practice-based literature, such as reports by UN agencies, NGOs and so on. Through class readings, and drawing on the experience of the tutor and your own experiences, the aim will be explore, contest and consider differing modes of engaging with sexualities on a global scale - as academics, health practioners, activists, development professionals and so on. The module will be taught via a combination of seminar-based readings and discussions, analysis of (ethnographic) film, reflexive class exercises and group presentations.

The Body: current controversies and debates

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

The body has recently become a key focus for sociological theorising and research. Much of this work has focused on defining the body as a socially constructed phenomenon, and exploring how it is produced through various social and cultural practices and discourses, and categories such as gender, class, race and sexual orientation. However, the body is also highly politically charged; a key site at which oppression is meted out, and is a focus of regulation and governance at individual, group, national and international levels. Bodies, and particularly women's bodies, are also at the nexus of some of the most controversial debates of our time.  

This module looks at the politics of the body from a sociological point of view, exploring themes of embodiment and power through a variety of controversial issues such as HIV/AIDS, sexual violence, sex work, abortion, cosmetic surgery and eugenics. You will think through various debates in relation to a broad canon of theories from feminism and sociology, around notions such as rights, bodily autonomy and integrity, structures and discourses, and the formation and regulation of identities. Gender will be a central thread throughout, and attention will be paid to how it intersects with other social categories such as class, 'race', sexual orientation, age, and (dis)ability.
 
 

Voices in the Archives: Writing from History

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

In this module you will consider how writers draw on history to shape their creative writing.

You will think about how different literary genres engage with the past through form, narrative and literary language, and look at the cultural impact of contemporary historical fiction. You will also consider work by poets and film-makers.

Authors studied may include Sarah Waters, Ian McEwan, Toni Morrison, Hilary Mantel, David Dabydeen, Mario Petrucci, George Szirtes and Michel Hazanavicius.

You will take part in creative workshops and develop key research skills, exploring the methodological implications of using physical and virtual archives.

You will work with historical newspapers, letters, diaries, prints, photographs and other documents to experiment with using language from the past to inflect contemporary voices.

Topics for discussion include the critical and ethical implications of writing about real historical events and characters. You will consider how contemporary writing is founded on a long tradition of writing from history, often re-visiting the past with a particular political or creative agenda, from Shakespeare and Dickens onwards.

You'll also explore how recent historical fiction interacts with other genres, for example in the fantasies of Susanna Clarke and Angela Carter and consider theoretical work on memory and nostalgia by critics such as Mieke Bal and Svetlana Boym.

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