Media Practice for Development and Social Change MA

Key information

Duration:
1 year full time, 2 years part time
Start date:
September 2018
Apply by:
1 August (International), 1 September (UK/EU)

This unique course combines critically analysing development, democratisation processes and social change with gaining creative and technical media production skills.

You focus on media as tools for global social and political change with a strong emphasis on the role of civil society and (alternative) media organisations.

Social media, citizen journalism, activist media, participatory media and specialised broadcast media are successfully used to inform and engage audiences outside established channels of communication for issues such as:

  • social inequality
  • human rights
  • gender issues
  • environmental change.

Why choose this course?

  • This course is jointly taught between the School of Media, Film and Music and the School of Global Studies.
  • Media and Film at Sussex were ranked 7th in the UK for research impact in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014 REF) with a thriving research culture in film, media and cultural studies. 
  • Global Studies is a unique interdisciplinary school. Development Studies at Sussex was ranked 1st in the world (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017.
This MA has a truly global perspective and together with students coming from all five continents you are on a journey to change the world for the better.”Wilma De Jong
Co-convener of the Media Practice for Development and Social Change MA

Entry requirements

Degree requirements

You should normally have an upper second-class (2.1) undergraduate honours degree or above.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please select your country from the list.

Argentina

Degree requirements

Licenciado/Titulo with a final mark of 7.5-8.5 depending on your university. 

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Australia

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with second-class upper division.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Azerbaijan

Degree requirements

Magistr or Specialist Diploma with a minimum average mark of at least 4 or 81%

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Bahrain

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA 3.0/4.0 (Grade B).

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Bangladesh

Degree requirements

Masters degree with CGPA of at least 3.0/4.0.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Brazil

Degree requirements

Bacharel, Licenciado or professional title with a final mark of at least 7.5 or 8 depending on your university.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Brunei

Degree requirements

Bachelors (Honours) degree with second class upper division or GPA 3.1/4.0.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Canada

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA 3.3/4.0 (grade B+).

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Chile

Degree requirements

Licenciado with a final mark of 5-5.5/7 depending on your university.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

China

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree from a leading university with overall mark of 75%-85% depending on your university.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Colombia

Degree requirements

Licenciado with ‘Acreditacion de alta calidad' and a GPA of 3.5.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Cyprus

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree or Ptychion with a final mark of at least 7.5.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Ecuador

Degree requirements

Licenciado with a final mark of at least 17/20.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Egypt

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree from a university with an overall grade of 75%

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

France

Degree requirements

Licence with mention bien or Maîtrise with final mark of at least 13.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Germany

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree or Magister Artium with a final mark of 2.4 or better.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Ghana

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree from a public university with second-class upper division.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Greece

Degree requirements

Ptychion from an AEI with a final mark of at least 7.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hong Kong

Degree requirements

Bachelors (Honours) degree with second-class upper division.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

India

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree from a leading institution with overall mark of 55-70% depending on your university.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Indonesia

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree from an 'A' accredited university with GPA 3.0/4.0. 

Bachelors degree from a 'B' accredited university with GPA 3.2/4.0.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Iran

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree (Licence or Karshenasi) with a final mark of at least 15.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Italy

Degree requirements

Diploma di Laurea with an overall mark of at least 105.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Japan

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with a minimum C/GPA of at least 3.0/4.0 or equivalent.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Jordan

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA of at least 3.0/4.0.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Kazakhstan

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with an overall mark of 4 or better (on a scale of 1-5)/GPA 3,33.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Kenya

Degree requirements

Bachelors (Honours) degree with second-class upper division.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Kuwait

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA of at least 3.0/4.0 or B+

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Lebanon

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA 3.5/4.0 or 14/20.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Malawi

Degree requirements

Masters degree, depending on your university.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Malaysia

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA of at least 3.0/4.0

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Mexico

Degree requirements

Licenciado with a final mark of at least 8.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Nepal

Degree requirements

Masters degree with overall mark of 80%

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Nigeria

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with second-class upper division or CGPA of at least 3.5/5.0.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Norway

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with an overall grade of B.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Oman

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA of at least 3.3/4.0.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Pakistan

Degree requirements

Four-year bachelors degree with overall grade of 65% or Masters with 60%

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Palestine

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with GPA of at least 3.5/4.0 or B+

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Paraguay

Degree requirements

Bachelors with a final mark of at least 7.5/10.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Peru

Degree requirements

Licenciado with a final mark of 14/20 depending on your university.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Philippines

Degree requirements

Masters degree with 1.5/5.0 (where 1 is the highest) or 3.7/4.0

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Qatar

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with an overall CPGA of at least 3 (on a scale of 4).

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Russia

Degree requirements

Magistr or Specialist Diploma with a minimum average mark of at least 4.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Saudi Arabia

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with a CGPA 3.5/5.0 or 3/4.0.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Singapore

Degree requirements

Bachelors (Honours) degree with second-class upper division or CAP 4.0.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

South Africa

Degree requirements

Bachelors (honours) degree with second-class division 1.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

South Korea

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree from a leading university with CGPA of at least 3.5/4.0 or B+

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Spain

Degree requirements

Licenciado with a final mark of at least 2/4.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Sri Lanka

Degree requirements

Bachelors Special degree with upper second honours.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Switzerland

Degree requirements

Licence or Diplôme with 5/6 or 8/10.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Taiwan

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with overall mark of 70%-85% depending on your university.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Thailand

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA of at least 3.0/4.0 or equivalent.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Turkey

Degree requirements

Lisans Diplomasi with CGPA of at least 3.0/4.0 or equivalent depending on your university.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

United Arab Emirates

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA of at least 3.0/4.0 or equivalent.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

USA

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree with CGPA 3.3-3.5/4.0 depending on your university.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Vietnam

Degree requirements

Bachelors degree (with a Graduate Thesis/research component) with CGPA of at least 3.3/4.0 or 7.5/10.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Zambia

Degree requirements

Masters degree with GPA of 2.0/2.5 or equivalent.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Zimbabwe

Degree requirements

Bachelors (Honours) degree with second-class upper division.

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

My country is not listed

If your country is not listed, you need to contact us and find out the qualification level you should have for this course. Contact us at pg.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk

Subject-specific requirements

Your qualification can be in any subject. You can also apply for this course if you have relevant work experience or you submit a portfolio of work. 

English language requirements

IELTS (Academic)

Standard level (6.5 overall, including at least 6.0 in each component).

Check your IELTS qualification meets all of our entry requirements and find out more about IELTS

Alternative English language qualifications

Proficiency tests

Cambridge Advanced Certificate in English (CAE)

For tests taken before January 2015: grade B or above.

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CAE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Advanced

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE)

For tests taken before January 2015: grade C or above.

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill.

We would normally expect the CPE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Proficiency

Pearson (PTE Academic)

62 overall, including at least 56 in all four skills.

PTE (Academic) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Pearson (PTE Academic)

TOEFL (iBT)

88 overall, including at least 20 in Listening, 19 in Reading, 21 in Speaking, 23 in Writing.

TOEFL (iBT) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about TOEFL (iBT)

The TOEFL Institution Code for the University of Sussex is 9166.

English language qualifications

AS/A-level (GCE)

Grade C or above in English Language.

Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination (HKALE)/ AS or A Level: grade C or above in Use of English.

French Baccalaureat

A score of 12 or above in English.

GCE O-level

Grade C or above in English.

Brunei/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

Singapore/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

GCSE or IGCSE

Grade C or above in English as a First Language.

Grade B or above in English as a Second Language.

German Abitur

A score of 12 or above in English.

Ghana Senior Secondary School Certificate

If awarded before 1993: grades 1-6 in English language.

If awarded between 1993 and 2005: grades A-D in English language.

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE)

 Level 4, including at least 3 in each component in English Language.

Indian School Certificate (Standard XII)

The Indian School Certificate is accepted at the grades below when awarded by the following examination boards:

Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) – English Core only: 70%

Council for Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE) - English: 70% 

International Baccalaureate Diploma (IB)

English A or English B at grade 5 or above.

Irish Leaving Certificate

Grade C (Honours) or above in English.

Malaysian Certificate of Education (SPM) 119/GCE O-level

If taken before the end of 2008: grades 1-5 in English Language.

If taken from 2009 onwards: grade C or above in English Language.

The qualification must be jointly awarded by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES).

West African Senior School Certificate

Grades 1-6 in English language when awarded by the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) or the National Examinations Council (NECO).

English language support

If you don’t meet the English language requirements for your degree, you may be able to take a pre-sessional course.

Visas and immigration

Find out how to apply for a student visa

Admissions information for applicants

How to apply

You apply to Sussex using our postgraduate application system.

Personal statement

Yes. You must submit a personal statement as part of your application. 

Find out how to write a personal statement

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email pg.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk

Pre-Masters

Need to boost your academic skills for your taught course? Find out about Pre-Masters routes

Application deadlines

1 August (International), 1 September (UK/EU)

Course details

Full-time and part-time study

Choose to study this course full time or part time, to fit around your work and family life. Modules for the full-time course are listed below.

For details about the part-time course, contact us at mfm@sussex.ac.uk

How will I study?

You’ll learn in small groups with fellow students from around the world. You’ll acquire a range of practical media skills and can specialise in photography, documentary or multimedia.

You can also focus on topic-based fields such as poverty, environmental change, media regulation, migration or gender issues.

Assessment consists of:

  • a variety of practical media projects (documentary, podcast, web design, photography, multimedia project)
  • critical reflection reports
  • presentations
  • essays
  • the final project (work placement, independent media project or written dissertation).

Final project

Your final project can be an independent media project shot anywhere in the world, a written dissertation or industry experience (eight weeks with a charity, NGO or media company). Previous experiences have been at institutions such as Oxfam, Unicef, the United Nations and WorldGranny.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Core modules are taken by all students on the course. They give you a solid grounding in your chosen subject and prepare you to explore the topics that interest you most.

Options

Alongside your core modules, you can choose options to broaden your horizons and tailor your course to your interests.

Please note

If you’re receiving – or applying for – USA federal Direct Loan funds, you can’t undertake your placement/internship in the USA. Find out more about American Student Loans and Federal Student Aid 

Life as a Masters student

Postgraduate student Sylvia Gasana talks about her Media Practice for Development and Social Change MA

Our experts

  • School of Global Studies faculty
    Dr Paul Boyce

    Dr Paul Boyce

    Senior Lecturer in Anthropology and International Development

    Research interests

    Anthropology and Queer Theory in India, Anthropology of Sexualities, Anthropology of the Body, Applied Anthropology, Bioavailability, HIV prevention research, International Development, Intimacy, Male and Transgender Sex Work, Male Sex work in SE Africa, Psycho-social and Psychoanalytic perspectives in Anthropology, Queer and Transgender Representation, Queer Theory, Sexual and gendered subjectivities, Sexuality and Law in Nepal, Visual Anthropology and Media

    View Paul Boyce's profile

    Dr Geert De Neve

    Dr Geert De Neve

    Professor of Social Anthropology & SouthAsian Studies

    Research interests

    Anthropology of Development, anthropology of South Asia, Anthropology of the Global Economy, Corporate Social Responsibility and Ethical Trade, India, Poverty and inequality, Social Protection, Social transformation, Tamil Nadu

    View Geert De Neve's profile

    Dr Peter Luetchford

    Dr Peter Luetchford

    Senior Lecturer in Anthropology

    Research interests

    Coffee producers and cooperatives, Economic anthropology, ethical consumption, food politics, Latin America, Organic farming, Political anthropology, Spain, The moral economy

    View Peter Luetchford's profile

    Prof JoAnn McGregor

    Prof JoAnn McGregor

    Professor Of Human Geography

    Research interests

    African diasporas, Conflict and violence, Development studies, Migration, Refugees and asylum, Southern Africa social history, Ur

    View JoAnn McGregor's profile

    Dr Anke Schwittay

    Dr Anke Schwittay

    Senior Lecturer in Anthropology & International Development

    Research interests

    digital development, financial inclusion, humanitarian design, microfinance tourism, online microfinance, representations of development

    View Anke Schwittay's profile

  • School of Media, Film and Music faculty
    Ms Wilma De Jong

    Ms Wilma De Jong

    Senior Lecturer in Media & Film Studies

    Research interests

    Archives and media production, Documentary theory and practice, Film-based media (History, Theory & Practice), Interactive and web based documentaries, Media and international development, media and pressure groups

    View Wilma De Jong's profile

    Dr Emile Devereaux

    Dr Emile Devereaux

    Senior Lecturer In Digital Media

    Research interests

    Critical Gender Studies, Digital Art & Design, Digital Cartography, Digital Culture, Interaction design, media history and theory, Tactical Media, Visual Studies

    View Emile Devereaux's profile

    Dr Alisa Lebow

    Dr Alisa Lebow

    Reader In Film Studies

    Research interests

    Activism and Documentary, Documentary theory and practice, Experimental Documentary, First Person Film, Jewish Culture and Film, Queer and Transgender Representation, Revolution and Film, Turkish and Middle Eastern Documentary

    View Alisa Lebow's profile

    Dr Eleftheria Lekakis

    Dr Eleftheria Lekakis

    Senior Lecturer In Media & Communication

    Research interests

    civic engagement, consumer activism, cultural politics, Digital Culture, digital media, global communication, Humanitarianism, media activism, media sociology, Nationalism, political communication, political consumerism, promotional cultures

    View Eleftheria Lekakis's profile

    Ms Lizzie Thynne

    Ms Lizzie Thynne

    Reader in Film

    Research interests

    art cinema, contemporary television, Cultural and Critical Theory, Documentary theory and practice, Experimental Documentary, Feminist Art History, Film drama, Gay & Lesbian Studies, Gender and Sexuality, Life writing, Queer studies, Television History, Theory and Criticism, Visual fields, women's liberation

    View Lizzie Thynne's profile

Course enquiries

+44 (0)1273 877538 
mfm@​sussex.ac.uk

Course co-conveners:
Anke Schwittay a.schwittay@​sussex.ac.uk
Wilma De Jong w.dejong@​sussex.ac.uk

Find out about the School of Media, Film and Music

Fees and scholarships

How much does it cost?

Fees

UK/EU students:
£7,900 per year
Channel Islands and Isle of Man students:
£7,900 per year
International students:
£17,400 per year

Note that your fees may be subject to an increase on an annual basis.

If you’re studying part time over two years, you’ll be charged 50% of the equivalent 2018 full-time fee in each year of study. The fee in your second year – if you continue your studies without a break – will be subject to a 2.5% increase (subject to rounding).

Living costs

Find out typical living costs for studying at Sussex

How can I fund my course?

Postgraduate Masters loans

You can borrow up to £10,280 to help with fees and living costs if your course starts on or after 1 August 2017. Loans are available from the Student Loans Company if you’re from the UK or if you’re an EU national studying for a Masters.

Find out more about Postgraduate Masters Loans

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

How Masters scholarships make studying more affordable

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Careers

Civil society institutions, social movements and international development agencies increasingly require skilled and creative people to apply digital media technologies in enhancing their capacity to communicate, interact and influence within and across borders.

This MA has been developed specifically for those seeking employment in:

  • global or national media industries
  • NGOs and the international voluntary sector
  • international development institutions
  • independent media production companies.

Graduate destinations

94% of students from the Department of Media and Film were in work or further study six months after graduating. Recent graduates have gone on to jobs including:

  • video editor, MWP Digital Media
  • internet content and new media officer, Parks Canada Agency
  • news editor, Alpha Media Holdings.

(EPI, Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015 for postgraduates)

Critical Perspectives on Development, Media and Social Change

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1 credits

This new core module will explore the intersections of development, media and social change. It will begin with an overview of contemporary development challenges, as set against a backdrop of changing trends and understandings of development. It will go on to explore the ways in which media has been used as a tool to bring about social, political and economic change, examining different approaches to and understandings of change - from a conception of development as planned intervention carried out by states and development agencies through policies, projects and programmes to development as organised efforts by groups who have been marginalised from the development process through protest, resistance and mobilisation. The module will draw on examples from practice to examine and critically assess the contributions that media - documentary film, digital storytelling, photography, radio and internet based media, including blogging and social networking - can make to development and social change.

Producing Media for Development and Social Change

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1 credits

This core module introduces core practical skills in a range of media (digital documentary, radio, podcasting and web design) within a critical context focusing on development and social change. Integrating practice and theory, the module aims to develop insight and knowledge of independent and locally produced media initiatives that facilitate citizen participation and foster social development. After an introduction which sets out the contemporary media landscape and its relationship to an active public sphere, the module will focus on case studies of a variety of media projects - such as community radio, mobile media, and documentary projects in the developing world. The practical component of this module focuses on executing exercises in a variety of media formats which will integrate the acquired skills and insights. This course will include some master classes by NGO representatives and/or media professionals who will present a variety of case studies.

Dissertation (Media Practice, Development and Social Change)

  • 60 credits
  • All Year Teaching, Year 1 credits

We help you prepare for your dissertation by giving you the chance to attend dissertation workshops, individual tutorials, a day-long research in progress conference, and independent research and study.

The dissertation builds on the taught modules to enable you to develop a research proposal and a bibliography and undertake original and independent research using appropriate methodologies and conceptual approaches.

Dissertation (Media Practice, Development and Social Change) with Placement

  • 60 credits
  • All Year Teaching, Year 1 credits

You go on a 12-week work placement with an organisation working in a field relevant to the degree programme (normally undertaken from May-July after assessments on other courses are completed).

You can either identify your own placement, or apply for one held on a database of placement opportunities at School level, where more than 40 potential placement opportunities have already been identified.

We will work with alumni, research networks and external research users to provide as wide a choice as possible. In each case, a detailed work plan will be agreed between yourself, your supervisor and placement provider that is relevant to the programme and of value both in terms of your learning experience, and the external organisation's wider objectives. The placement should provide insight into the organisation's work, and include work on a defined project with agreed objectives and outcomes.

Where appropriate, permission may be granted for the placement to take place during 8-10 hours per week across the year, if the organisation is locally-based and working hours can be agreed.

Media Project for Development and Social Change

  • 60 credits
  • All Year Teaching, Year 1 credits

With guidance from your supervisor, and through workshops, you will design and execute a media project relevant to development and social change.

Accompanying the project you will also provide a 5,000 word written critical self-reflection on the process and outcomes.

This will include a relevant biblography of relevant media and scholarly sources, and demonstrate your critical evaluation of and engagement with relevant scholarship.

Media Project for Development and Social Change with Placement

  • 60 credits
  • All Year Teaching, Year 1 credits

The placement is a student-led placement developed in close consultation with the module convenor, with the details agreed by all parties in a Work Plan finalised in TB2.

The placement is assessed via a portfolio of media work including a 5,000 word critical analysis (essay). The placement and project is supported through dissertation workshops, tutorials, and work in progress demonstrations.

Activism for Development and Social Justice

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

This modue addresses the ways in which activists and activism have sought to engage in development and social justice. It explores and evaluates different approaches to activism, grounding this in theories of social mobilisation and citizenship, and will work through a series of practical examples, drawing on empirical material produced by anthropologists and others, to explore how activism has been used to address issues of development and social justice. In doing so it will seek to build on the material introduced in previous terms, on theories of social change and approaches to development and social justice, to explore how different kinds of activisms seek to bring about change. The module will explore the contributions that imaginative, insurgent, disruptive and chaotic forms of social action have to make to development, and will cover a range of collective action from the use of petitions and lobbying of representatives, to the use of the arts in 'interrupting' everyday life to bring some of its elements into question, to mobilisation for protests and peaceful demonstrations, to non-violent direct action and info-activism.

Activist Media Practice

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

Social movements have historically struggled to get their message reported clearly, accurately and effectively through the lens of mainstream media. This has lead to the rise of alternative media practices and strategies to break through or unsettle the corporate and state-run media systems around the world. In order to challenge hegemonic discourses, activist media seeks to circumvent and dismantle traditional media's communicative strategies either through a disruptive aesthetic or through a reconfigured mode of civic engagement. Whether through radical leaflets, pirate radio, graffiti, protest music, performance art, activist videos, political documentaries, or social media and the internet, today's media landscape has evolved into a range of complex transnational networks that can be activated by independent counter-hegemonic media practices and expressions.

This module asks you to learn about various forms of cultural resistance (through readings, screenings, lectures and discussions) in order to to formulate an effective form of activist media provocation. This piece of activist media may take the form of a video, a website, site-specific performance, series of photographs, media prank, etc. You will also be asked to write a reflective essay that contextualises the finished piece within the conceptual debates of the module.

Interactive Project Development

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

The module focuses on the methods, processes and research techniques involved in the development of interactive media projects from initial concept to distribution -- with close analyses of how the different stages of a project are related, planned and connected to other media.

You will learn how to identify original sources and subjects with a view to creating a distinctive style and approach through practical exercises and the creation of a test or pilot project. The module will aid you in the development of the tools required to conceptually frame your interactive practice and help them communicate clearly and critically. During the module you will be given time to explore media projects in a variety of media and to consider the implications of those projects for your own work. You will be asked to study and discuss a number of different methods for the critical appraisal and theorisation of creative media projects across genres and will be expected to show initiative in undertaking a wide range of research to help develop your ideas and skills (viewing, listening, reading, observing, testing of techniques, etc).

The module is taught through a combination of presentations by the module tutor as well as individual students, group-critiques and one-on-one critiques. 

The module uses an application form containing questions drawn from industry and research council funding and commisioning calls as a structure for you to focus and present your work. At the end of the module, you will produce a proposal in the form of a contextualising essay answering all the questions on the application form, a work plan, a pilot project demonstrating the style and forms of itneraction in your project and a journal demonstrating how you have thought through you ideas, what has emerged from the discussion and in-class critiques. This combination of essay and pilot will be the framework for you self-directed project.

Knowledge, Power and Resistance

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

The purpose of this module is to reflect on the various ways in which power and knowledge interact within contexts of development and economic change. Whilst providing you with the conceptual apparatus to theorise notions of discourse, power and resistance, much of the course will deal with the historically and culturally contingent nature of the various meanings given to 'development', 'modernity' and 'tradition' and how these are in turn linked to different forms of knowledge. As the module will show, narratives and counter narratives of development are not only produced by the developers and 'developees', but also by those studying them. They are also inextricable from relations of power.

The first part of the module engages with the theoretical framework provided by the concepts of ideology, hegemony and discourse, looking at the work of Gramsci and Foucault in week 2. In the following week we will consider the implications of concepts from these thinkers in analyses of development, particularly discourse theory. We shall then move on to consider the concept of resistance and what it means for development practice. In weeks 5 and 6 we consider two cases. First is the domain of developmental knowledge 'women in development', and we look at ways it has been contested both by activists and academics. Then we turn to the environment and consider the role of anthropologists who refuse to take for granted categories such as 'indigenous knowledge'.

In the latter part of the module we shall pursue analyses of power and culture in relation to modernity. In week 7 we critically assess bureaucracies, governance and work on neoliberal ideas of freedom, power and knowledge in the production of policy and bureaucratic structures. We will explore how Foucault's later work directs anthropological attention to the production of the self within development projects.

In weeks 8 and 9 we consider in more detail how different forms of knowledge, power and culture interrelate within contexts of colonial and post-colonial intervention and development. Just as these are highly complex, so too are the reactions of the subjects of the developmental gaze, who have their own versions of modernity and development. In week 8 we consider the various ways in which local people imagine and represent development and modernity. In week 9 we will evaluate the benefits of an 'actor network' approach to development and how it might take us beyond a focus on 'discourse'. As we will see, the discourse of development is itself far from static or monolithic.

Media Audiences

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

On this module you will explore and evaluate the broad tradition of critical research into media audiences which has developed over the past two decades.  You will consider, through an exploration of this tradition, how we should understand the nature of media texts, and in particular how meanings, uses, (dis)pleasures and responses are produced in the complex interactions between audiences and texts, in specific social settings.  This module gives you the chance - and to develop the skills to be able - to carry out a small piece of original audience research. Key methods encountered on the module include interviews, semi-structured focus group discussions, open-ended questionnaires, respondents' letters, and participant observation.

New Developments in Digital Media 1a

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

This module critically surveys developments in the expanding field of new media and explores the dynamics driving digital convergence, which is viewed as an industrial, political, social, economic and technological process. You will consider what drives convergence between previously discrete industries, technologies, and contents, and what limits convergence processes. You will explore key developments in the field of new media, including phenomena such as social networks, pervasive and locative technologies, new forms of knowledge organization and gathering.

The module is both theoretical and practical, with seminars exploring the areas outlined above through critical reading, while a series of workshops provide you with an understanding of core technologies underlying contemporary developments, and help you gain literacy in approaches to content development in this field.

Photography: Documentary, Landscape, Politics

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

This module introduces you to a wide range of work in the documentary and landscape genres, both historical and contemporary, but with an emphasis on `conceptual documentary' and contemporary politicised landscape photography. You will also focus on the problematics of documentary and photojournalism, such as ethical issues and questions of efficacy, and the use of text and sound in documentary publications, gallery installations and websites.

The module will be taught through tutor-led discussion in seminars, and regular `group crits' of student work-in-progress in the lab. Early on in the module you will conceive and research your own idea for a photographic project, and start producing images for class viewing. The module will equip you with the necessary production & critical skills to continue working independently on your projects during the Easter vacation before the assessment deadline in early Summer.

Poverty, Vulnerability and the Global Economy

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

Race, Culture and the Media

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

This module explores the intersection of race, culture and analogue/digital media.

It begins by looking at the origins of these debates and introduces how their transformation can be approached through discourse and performance.

It then moves to explore key theoretical lenses through which this module’s topic can be engaged, including a discussion of:

  • whiteness
  • class
  • gender
  • post-colonialism

Following this conceptual grounding, the course explores a number of contemporary debates that highlight different transformations of race, culture and the media.

These include explorations of the War on Terror, drone warfare, urban multiculture (sound systems, pirate radio and YouTube music videos), #blacklivesmatter, and debates on post-race. Through these means the module complements the School’s offerings in the areas of media, digital media, culture and social change in addition to complementing Global Studies options.

Subjects may include:

  • origins and transformations: race, culture and media
  • whiteness
  • race and class
  • race, gender and difference  
  • post-colonialism and orientalism
  • the War on Terror: Twin Towers to Jihadi John
  • drone warfare
  • urban multiculture: from analogue to digital
  • #blacklivesmatters
  • post-race and rehumanistion

Sexuality and Development: Intimacies, Health and Rights in Global Perspective

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

This module explores sexualities in the context of global socio-economic changes and development practice. It brings together theoretical perspectives on sexual subjectivity with a range of applied concerns relating to health, activism and policy.

In particular the module examines ways in which "dissident sexual subjects" have been imagined globally, often both included and marginalised in communities, in the state and internationally.

Themes and issues include:

  • sexual subjectivities, intimate lives and global transformations
  • HIV and Aids through anthropology and policy
  • citizenship, economies and queer abandonment
  • sexuality, law and the state
  • UN agencies and (im)possible sexual subjects
  • sexualities in transition – trans-subjectivites, trans-bodies, trans-nationalisms
  • viral and virtual intimacies
  • sex work, sex, and work
  • working with non-governmental organisations (NGOs) on sexual rights and health
  • global dialogue, sexual rights, wellbeing and marginalisation.

You will also look at concerns such as new imaginaries of sexual identity and subjectivity portrayed in the media, through new technology and via neoliberalism.

The module will be taught through seminar-based readings and discussions, film analysis, reflexive class exercises and group presentations.

You'll draw widely on literature from anthropology and the social sciences, comparing theoretical perspectives on sexuality with more practice-based literature, such as reports by UN agencies, NGOs and so on.

The aim will be explore, contest and consider differing modes of engaging with sexualities on a global scale – as academics, health practioners, activists and so forth.

Sexuality and Development: Intimacies, Health and Rights in Global Perspective

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

The module will explore sexualities as sites of political contestation, claims to rights and intimate aspirations in context of global socio-economic transformations, international health and development practice. The module will bring together theoretical perspectives on sexual subjectivity and sexual life, worlds with a range of applied concerns relating to health, actvism and development policy, and programming internationally. In particular the module will examine ways in which 'dissident sexual subjects' have been imagined globally, often both included and marginalised in different domains, such as the community, the state and international policy fora.

Themes and issus addressed by the module will include:

  • Sexual subjectivities, intimate lives and global transformations
  • Heteronormativity in interntional development and health
  • HIV and AIDS: Epidemiology, anthropology and policy - contested engagements with sexual lives and 'key populations'
  • Citizenship, economies and queer abandonment
  • Sexuality, law and the state: Homonational contestations
  • UN agencies and (im)possible sexual subjects
  • Sexualities in transition: trans-subjectivites, trans-bodies and trans-nationalisms
  • Viral and virtual intimacies
  • Intimate economies: Sex work, sex and work
  • Collaborative action: working with NGOs on sexual rights and health
  • Creative engagement: visual ethnographic work on sexual life-worlds - globally
  • Advocacy and exclusions: Global dialogues, sexual rights, well-being and marginalisations 

Sexual life-worlds are increasingly interpreted in relation to global flows and transitions. One way in which connections between global processes and sexualities are becoming ever-more visible is in relation to new imaginaries of sexual identity and subjectivity, as mediated through transnational media, new communication technologies and the global momentum of neo-liberal capital. International development and heath practices are closely associated with such social processes as they seek to respond to the changing and enduring attributes of sexual lives, practices and risks in the context of wider concerns for well-being. The module will respond to such concerns and seek to equip you with both theoretical and practice based frameworks for engaging with a range of themes and issues related to sexuality and development.

The module will be interdisciplinary in focus, drawing more widely on literature from anthropology and the social sciences, international development, health, gender and sexuality studies. In particular the module will seek to explore a range of literatures comparatively, bringing theoretical perspectives on sexuality into dialogue with more practice-based literature, such as reports by UN agencies, NGOs and so on. Through class readings, and drawing on the experience of the tutor and your own experiences, the aim will be explore, contest and consider differing modes of engaging with sexualities on a global scale - as academics, health practioners, activists, development professionals and so on. The module will be taught via a combination of seminar-based readings and discussions, analysis of (ethnographic) film, reflexive class exercises and group presentations.

Short Documentary: Research and Production

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

This module focuses on the methods, processes and research techniques involved in the development of documentary projects from initial concept to distribution, with close analyses of how the different stages of a production are related and may be planned. You will learn how to identify original sources and subjects with a view to creating a distinctive style and approach through practical exercises and the shooting of pilot material. You will study and undertake the development process in relation to acquiring a critical understanding of the markets and other exhibition possibilities for projects from galleries and festivals to the web and television. You will look at how to locate and utilise archives, contributors, interviewees, performers, locations and facilities. Key areas to be explored include scripting, budgeting, scheduling, copyright and contracts, with reference to contemporary and historical examples. You will also look critically at a range of production methods and ways of working through looking both at case studies of specific productions and companies. You may undertake short optional placements as part of your research for this unit.

Transnationalism, Diaspora and Migrants' Lives

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

In this module you:

  • engage critically with key theoretical debates over the concepts of transnationalism and diaspora
  • assess qualitative methodological approaches to transnational dimensions of migrants' lives
  • reflect critically on representations of migrants and mobility
  • demonstrate knowledge of the power relations and institutional contexts that shape migrant agency, transnational connections and expressions of diasporic identity
  • critically evaluate policies, campaigns and migrants' own initiatives in relation to specific transnational engagements.

Transnationalism, Diaspora and Migrants' Lives

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1 credits

In this module you:

  • engage critically with key theoretical debates over the concepts of transnationalism and diaspora
  • assess qualitative methodological approaches to transnational dimensions of migrants' lives
  • reflect critically on representations of migrants and mobility
  • demonstrate knowledge of the power relations and institutional contexts that shape migrant agency, transnational connections and expressions of diasporic identity
  • critically evaluate policies, campaigns and migrants' own initiatives in relation to specific transnational engagements.
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