MA
1 year full time, 2 years part time
Starts September 2017

English: Literature, Culture and Theory

Combine specialist study, theoretical inquiry and interdisciplinary investigations to explore literature, culture and history.

Our MA allows you to focus your study on a specific period or concept, or to engage broadly with ideas across a wide historic range. The diverse research interests of the School will ensure you are supported in shaping your course to your particular interests.

We’ll help you to engage with theoretical ideas and conceptual methods that underpin research in literature. You’ll graduate equipped with the skills necessary for further study inside and outside academia.

Key facts

  • Our research quality was ranked in the top 10 in the UK in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF).
  • English at Sussex is ranked in the top 15 in the UK (The Guardian University Guide 2018, The Complete University Guide 2018 and The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017and in the top 100 in the world in the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017.
  • Your teaching is underpinned by the interdisciplinary research carried out in centres such as the Centre for Modernist Studies and the Centre for Early Modern and Medieval Studies.

How will I study?

You will study taught modules in the autumn and spring terms. There are core modules and options. In the summer term, you will undertake supervised dissertation work.

You are assessed by:

  • two 3,000-word exercises for the core module
  • three 5,000-word term papers for the options
  • a dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

Full-time and part-time study

You can choose to study this course full time or part time. Find the modules for the full-time course below. 

For details about the part-time course structure, contact us at englishpg@sussex.ac.uk

What will I study?

  • Module list

    Core modules

    Core modules are taken by all students on the course. They give you a solid grounding in your chosen subject and prepare you to explore the topics that interest you most.

    • Interpretation, Theory, and Research Methods in Literary Study

      30 credits
      Autumn Teaching, Year 1

      This module provides students beginning the English Literature, Culture and Theory MA with the knowledge and practical experience of research methods needed to undertake research as a literary scholar. It enables you to interrogate some of the theoretical and cultural assumptions that underpin research in English, both past and present.

    • Dissertation (English MA programmes)

      60 credits
      Summer Teaching, Year 1

      This module gives you the opportunity to undertake supervised work on a dissertation of up to 20,000 words, on a topic of your choice agreed with your supervisor. If you are a part-time student, you will begin your background reading for the dissertation in the first summer term and vacation of your studies.

    Options

    Alongside your core modules, you can choose options to broaden your horizons and tailor your course to your interests.

    • Blackness, Innocence, Modernity

      30 credits
      Autumn Teaching, Year 1

    • British Modernism

      30 credits
      Autumn Teaching, Year 1

      During this module you explore the achievements and limits of Modernism. Our focus will be on work made in Britain, and there will be a spatial dimension to our discussions. We consider the importance of the metropolis in the development of modernism, as well as modernism's national, regional and local dimensions. We draw on sites in and around Sussex. You study work by Eliot and Woolf among other poets and novelists. The module is interdisciplinary – comparisons will be made between innovations in the visual arts and in writing – and you engage with current and past criticism of modernism.

      You analyse the formal features of modernist works. Modernist experimentation is situated in a historical context, and you consider how modernism intersects with developments in technology, thinking about gender, mass culture, psychoanalysis and philosophy. You also examine modernist responses to key events of the period, including the First and the Second World Wars. The focus is on the early and mid-twentieth century, but you also think about the legacies of modernism and question these temporal perimeters.

    • Literature and Society, 1750-1890

      30 credits
      Autumn Teaching, Year 1

      Literature & Society, 1750-1890 explores the interplay between the nationwide perspectives of social philosophy and the more individualistic concerns of literary culture in the late 18th and 19th centuries. It offers you a chance to make broad connections across the period, at the same time as providing you with in-depth knowledge of principal theoreticians of culture in these decades and their major works. Emphasis will be placed on the manner in which literary works can be read in conversation with, and in opposition to, social theory with each seminar structured around close readings of an example of each style of writing.

    • New Configurations in Critical Theory

      30 credits
      Autumn Teaching, Year 1

      You explore a wide range of contemporary approaches in critical theory. These approaches have emerged from 20th-century philosophy, literary theory and psychoanalysis, as well as a variety of other disciplines.

      Our investigations are loosely mapped to four interrelated topoi—literature, aesthetics, politics, and science—and comprise a number of pressing theoretical issues. These are:

      • affect, biopolitics and 'life'
      • impersonality, animality and the posthuman,
      • the status of conceptual art
      • the earth, political ontology
      • the common and communism
      • new materialisms
      • science and the brain
      • networks and information
      • systems theory and complexity theory.

      Possible readings include the works of Deleuze, Guattari, Agamben, Badiou, Rancière, Esposito, Bennett, Malabou, Smithson, or Luhmann.

    • The History of Domesticity: Literature, Public and Private 1700-1800

      30 credits
      Autumn Teaching, Year 1

      Ideas of the 'private' and the 'public' are central to the ways we think about literature, culture, sexuality and subjectivity, and they are also terms whose history intersects with the emergence of both modern literary culture and modern subjectivities in fascinating ways. Jurgen Habermas's contention, that the convergence of public and private spheres constituted a foundational moment in the emergence of modernity, has significant implications for the way we think about writing, as public, private, or both. This module offers the chance to trace how developing notions of public/private not only informed the development of the recognisably modern literary culture of this period, but were also problematised and contested by it. The module will focus on three intersecting areas:

      (1) the writing of sexuality within the private/public space of the novel;
      (2) the politicisation of privacy and secrecy in the politically fraught period of the 1790s; and
      (3) the representation of domesticities, including the Gothic castle and the cottage, and their resistance of easy categorisations as public/private spaces.

      Sources examined will range from fictional and non-fictional texts to visual materials, aesthetic and political writings, and contemporary theory.

    • The Renaissance Body

      30 credits
      Autumn Teaching, Year 1

      In early-modern England the body was a major intellectual preoccupation and a focal metaphor informing and shaping cultural structures and artefacts. This period, too, like the cusp of the 21st century, had a very distinctive conception of the person as a construct or artifice, as the product of social intervention and cultural organization. Engaging with interpretative models from the fascinating interdisciplinary field of cultural theory of the body, you will explore the aesthetics of embodiment through a range of literary and visual texts, unravelling the dense significance of the corporeal imagination of the Renaissance. Key themes include: body borders, the supernatural and society; gendered voices, sex and agency; the medical imagination; diabolic inversions (the witch's body); heroic and monstrous masculinities; transvestitism; mystical monarchy; diseased bodies; revolutionary corporealities; body, soul and mind; consuming bodies and eating communities; the fabricated body; and pornography.

    • Theory in Practice: Readings in Contemporary Theory and Literature

      30 credits
      Autumn Teaching, Year 1

      What is 'theory'? Although it goes in and out of fashion with the speed of rising or plunging hemlines, the use of theory, literary theory, or literary criticism as a way to read literary texts is always useful. And contrary to popular opinion, it's not the application of an arcane or secret language to garner a secret knowledge. Rather, it is a self-conscious and informed method of analysing the presuppositions behind the apparently natural way we read; indeed, sometimes it's a method of reading in itself, derived from a philosophy or theory of language, as is the case with Bataille or Derrida. Theory sounds dull, but really it's a creative practice, as is reading, which Walter Benjamin likened to telepathy.

      This module seeks, through a number of case studies, to address a number of critical paradigms that have proved significant in the post-war period. In particular, notions of materialism, materiality and historicity will be set in tension with ideas about relativism, deconstruction and 'play' as very different ways of construing some iconic American texts. Alongside the close reading of primary and secondary texts, discussions in class will be directed towards such subjects as: the construction/reflection of subjectivity in language and discourse; the relation of the literary text to sociality; the effects and efficacy of modernist/avant-garde/postmodern literary techniques; and the writing of race, gender and class.

    • Capital and Poetics

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      In the wake of the end of the Cold War and especially since September 11, as neoconservatives replaced Marxism with 'terrorism' as their new and irrational enemy, many writers in America and Europe sought with redoubled commitment to revitalise elements of Marxist thinking in their creative practice: to confront the new dominant form of rationality with a creative rationality of the dominated.

      This module will investigate the history and present significance of that commitment in several ways: through study of the tradition of Marxist thinking about the relation of aesthetics to social and political life; through consideration of mainstream trends in contemporary literature and the economic and political interests they reflect and fortify; and through the evaluation of theoretical claims made by contemporary writers themselves, both in creative writing and in criticism, about their own strategies of opposition and the problem of their potential efficacy.

    • Capital Culture: Money, Commerce and Writing

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module offers you the opportunity to explore the interconnections between literature and commercial capitalism in a wide variety of literary and other texts drawn largely, but not exclusively, from the period 1710-1820, which saw the rise of modern capitalism. The module traces the responses of writers to the emergence of modern commercial society including the celebration of trade and empire, concerns about social change, the representation of labour and the critique of capitalism from Romantic poets and other writers. Topics addressed include the commodity and the fetish; property and the 'it-narrative'; labour, literary labour, and idleness; slavery; sex and money; consumption and consumerism; the role of art and the artist in commercial society; and different ideas of value (economic and aesthetic). Texts studied will include visual art, alongside novels, poetry, short stories, autobiography, journalism, essays and economic writings. Short extracts from the works of Adam Smith and Karl Marx will provide theoretical perspectives.

    • Image and Text 1780-1880

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      Concentrating on the intersections between visual and verbal cultures in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, this module explores the intricate inter-relationships of visual images and texts (poetry, non-fictional prose, and fiction). Beginning with Edmund Burke's A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and the Beautiful (1757) and Immanuel Kant's 'Analytic of the Sublime' from The Critique of Judgement (1790), in relationship to recent theoretical work on the sublime (by Lyotard and Eagleton for example), we consider the aesthetic of the sublime as played out in painting and in art theory. Subsequent topics include: the case of the Elgin Marbles; Ekphrasis; discourses of the grotesque in John Ruskin and William Morris; poetry and scientific discourse; Pre-Raphaelitism; the history and theory of nineteenth century photography; representations of childhood in Lewis Carroll, Christina Rossetti and J.M. Barrie; 'Symbolism' and the 'Supernatural'.

    • ImagiNation: The Great American Novel

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      'The Great American Novel' became something of a shibboleth in the 20th century, for American writers and critics alike. Was it possible to capture the essence, as well as the diversity, of the American nation in fiction? And if so, how should this be done – in a novel of panoramic reach, such as John Dos Passos' USA to Don De Lillo's Underworld, or in representation of America's historico-political unconscious, such as Toni Morrison's Beloved or Jayne Anne Phillips' Machine Dreams, or could a topic so ostensibly small as family life come to take on the burden of representative American-ness, as in Jonathan Frantzen's The Corrections?

      In this course you will look at representations of American history in fiction-both film and literature-to discover how American fiction of the 20th and 21st centuries has represented American history, politics, and most of all national identity. Because of this subject matter, you will be taking on big novels, which may also be great –though the definition of 'greatness' will itself be part of your investigation, rather than a foregone conclusion. You will, for example, consider questions of representativeness as well as representation, and this will involve issues of gender, race and ethnicity, mainstream and margin, the local and the cosmopolitan. You will be drawing on cultural theory and historiography to put your reading and viewing into scholarly perspective.

    • International Modernisms, 1840-Present

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module will take a long view of modernism, one inextricable from the development of avant-garde aesthetics.

      Europe is often credited with the inception of experimental, self-reflexive artistic practice. In our reading, we will examine continental authors and aim to take a more global view of avant-gardism. We will attend to influential authors that are not often or readily considered in English-speaking university curricula. These writers – French, Italian, Russian, German, American, Spanish, Chilean, Argentine, and Caribbean – challenge, reinforce, and expand more familiar models of Anglo-American modernism.

      You will go beyond just reading manifestos and overviews of the Dadist movement – we will ask you not only to think about what Futurism is, but to closely read F.T. Marinetti's Mafarka the Futurist: An African Novel. The module encompasses fiction, drama, and poetry. All works will be read in English, and issues of translation and transmission will form part of our discussion.

    • Literature and Society, 1750-1890

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      Literature & Society, 1750-1890 explores the interplay between the nationwide perspectives of social philosophy and the more individualistic concerns of literary culture in the late 18th and 19th centuries. It offers you a chance to make broad connections across the period, at the same time as providing you with in-depth knowledge of principal theoreticians of culture in these decades and their major works. Emphasis will be placed on the manner in which literary works can be read in conversation with, and in opposition to, social theory with each seminar structured around close readings of an example of each style of writing.

    • New Configurations in Critical Theory

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module will explore a wide range of contemporary critical approaches that have emerged not only out of the influential work of 20th century philosophy, literary theory and psychoanalysis, but also from a variety of disciplinary quarters. Our investigations will be loosely mapped to four interrelated topics of literature, aesthetics, politics and science but comprise a number of pressing theoretical issues. These are: affect, biopolitics, 'life', impersonality, animality, the posthuman, the status of conceptual art, the earth, political ontology, the common and communism, new materialisms, science and the brain, networks and information, systems theory and complexity theory. Possible readings include the work of Deleuze, Guattari, Agamben, Badiou, Rancière, Esposito, Bennett, Malabou, Smithson or Luhmann.

    • Spectacular Imaginings: Renaissance Drama and the Stage 1580-1640

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module explores English Renaissance drama and its staging between the advent of the commercial theatres in London (circa 1580) and their closure during the early 1640s as a consequence of the English Civil War. This new module has been developed with, and will be co-taught by, scholars and theatre practitioners at London's Globe Theatre. The Globe's programme at both its new indoor Jacobean theatre (the Sam Wannamaker theatre) as well as its main outdoor theatre will form an important part of this module with you attending performances at both venues.

      The module will focus on a selection of plays from this period exploring them in their original social, cultural and aesthetic contexts. It will also reflect upon why plays from this era are so frequently and successfully re-produced for the modern stage and screen. What roles did theatre play in London during the Renaissance and why was England virtually unique in Europe (Spain is the only counterpart) in creating a large-scale commercial theatre that generated a vast corpus of new plays? The module examines many of the most significant themes with which this theatre engages, among them unruly sexualities (incest, adultery and rape); violence and eloquence; London and city commerce; domestic tragedy; marriage and divorce; the place of the court; the foreign and the exotic; and the supernatural. It considers the roles of genre, acting styles, theatre companies, star actors, boy players, audiences and the varying physical spaces of the theatres in mediating these themes.

      You will have access to the unique Globe archives when researching your dissertation project. Four of the plays will be determined by the Globe's season (including at least one by Shakespeare). The tragedies, comedies, histories and tragi-comedies studied will include works by Marlowe, Webster, Ford, Middleton, Dekker, Beaumont and Fletcher, Cary, Marston and Shakespeare.

    • Technologies of Capture: Photography and Nineteenth Century Literature

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      The photographic image is ubiquitous, its presence has morphed into many 21st century cultural manifestations. Most obviously, in digital form, the photograph has become a staple of social networking sites and other visual modes of communication. Yet at its invention in 1839, the status and future of photography was far from clear-cut. Known as 'the black art from France' owing to its miraculous transcription of the visual world photography was frequently aligned with magic. Indeed, owing to its causal connection to its referent, a photograph had the status of an imprint as well as an image. People also delighted in seeing themselves the right way round as the photograph corrected the lateral inversion of the familiar mirror image. At the other end of the spectrum, however, photography's 'birth' was considered by some enough to bring about the 'death' of painting. In the nineteenth century, the presence of the camera radically affected major social, aesthetic and philosophical categories. 

      While photographs revolutionised representation, their relationship to existing visual and verbal forms was rich and complex and raised many questions. What did it mean to speak about literary 'realism' in the context of Fox-Talbot's new negative/positive process? How did post-mortem photographs affect literary portrayals of death and the spirit world? What was the impact upon Victorian institutions such as the asylum of the new genre of the photographic 'mug-shot'? What form of translation occurred when a two-dimensional photograph recorded the three-dimensional form of sculpture? This module explores the emergence and development of the photographic medium in relationship to a range of literary texts. Beginning with the 'pre-history' of photography as manifest in a range of optical toys, gadgets and visual spectacles it traces the emergence of various photographic forms as they intersect with literary ones. You have the opportunity to engage, in the context of 19th century fiction, poetry and non-fictional prose, fascinating material and conceptual changes that occur in the wake of the advent and popularisation of photography. 

      Topics for discussion include: the Picturesque; photographing sculpture (the case of the Parthenon Marbles); Pre-Raphaelitism; post-mortem photographs; spirit photography; photography and science; collecting and cartes de visite; the camera in colonial encounters; photography and disciplinary institutions; detective fiction; and photographing children. 


      No prior experience of photography or other visual media is required simply a readiness to engage visual technologies and images in addition to literary texts.

    • The Uncanny

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      The uncanny is difficult to define: it is mysterious, eerie, at once strange and familiar. It offers especially productive possibilities for exploring issues of identity and liminality, boundaries and interdisciplinarity. This module will engage with the uncanny across a wide range of texts and contexts, extending from literature (novels, short stories, drama and poetry) to film. Discussion will focus on a number of linked topics, including repetition, doubles, strange coincidences, animism, live burial, telepathy, death and laughter. 

      The module aims to develop your engagement with the notion of the uncanny across a broad range of literary and other texts; to develop your skills of reading and critical analysis, especially insofar as the uncanny by its nature engenders intellectual uncertainty and calls for an unusual critical patience; to enhance your capacity for critical reflection on their experience of the familiar and the strange, the ordinary and the extraordinary.

    • Theory in Practice: Readings in Contemporary Theory and Literature

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      What is 'theory'? Although it goes in and out of fashion with the speed of rising or plunging hemlines, the use of theory, literary theory, or literary criticism as a way to read literary texts is always useful. And contrary to popular opinion, it's not the application of an arcane or secret language to garner a secret knowledge. Rather, it is a self-conscious and informed method of analysing the presuppositions behind the apparently natural way we read; indeed, sometimes it's a method of reading in itself, derived from a philosophy or theory of language, as is the case with Bataille or Derrida. Theory sounds dull, but really it's a creative practice, as is reading, which Walter Benjamin likened to telepathy.

      This module seeks, through a number of case studies, to address a number of critical paradigms that have proved significant in the post-war period. In particular, notions of materialism, materiality and historicity will be set in tension with ideas about relativism, deconstruction and 'play' as very different ways of construing some iconic American texts. Alongside the close reading of primary and secondary texts, discussions in class will be directed towards such subjects as: the construction/reflection of subjectivity in language and discourse; the relation of the literary text to sociality; the effects and efficacy of modernist/avant-garde/postmodern literary techniques; and the writing of race, gender and class.

    • Voices in the Archives: Writing from History

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      In this module you will consider how writers draw on history to shape their creative writing.

      You will think about how different literary genres engage with the past through form, narrative and literary language, and look at the cultural impact of contemporary historical fiction. You will also consider work by poets and film-makers.

      Authors studied may include Sarah Waters, Ian McEwan, Toni Morrison, Hilary Mantel, David Dabydeen, Mario Petrucci, George Szirtes and Michel Hazanavicius.

      You will take part in creative workshops and develop key research skills, exploring the methodological implications of using physical and virtual archives.

      You will work with historical newspapers, letters, diaries, prints, photographs and other documents to experiment with using language from the past to inflect contemporary voices.

      Topics for discussion include the critical and ethical implications of writing about real historical events and characters. You will consider how contemporary writing is founded on a long tradition of writing from history, often re-visiting the past with a particular political or creative agenda, from Shakespeare and Dickens onwards.

      You'll also explore how recent historical fiction interacts with other genres, for example in the fantasies of Susanna Clarke and Angela Carter and consider theoretical work on memory and nostalgia by critics such as Mieke Bal and Svetlana Boym.

Entry requirements

An upper second-class (2.1) undergraduate honours degree or above in a subject relevant to the Masters degree

English language requirements

Higher level (IELTS 7.0, with not less than 6.5 in each section)

Find out about other English language qualifications we accept.

English language support

Don’t have the English language level for your course? Find out more about our pre-sessional courses.

Additional information for international students

We welcome applications from all over the world. Find out about international qualifications suitable for our Masters courses.

Visas and immigration

Find out how to apply for a student visa


Fees and scholarships

How much does it cost?

Fees

Home: £7,700 per year

EU: £7,700 per year

Channel Islands and Isle of Man: £7,700 per year

Overseas: £15,100 per year

Note that your fees may be subject to an increase on an annual basis.

How can I fund my course?

Postgraduate Masters loans

Borrow up to £10,280 to contribute to your postgraduate study.

Find out more about Postgraduate Masters Loans

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's Masters Scholarship (2017)

Open to students with a 1st class from a UK university or excellent grades from an EU university and offered a F/T place on a Sussex Masters in 2017

Application deadline:

1 August 2017

Find out more about the Chancellor's Masters Scholarship

Sussex Future Leaders Masters Scholarship in English (2017)

The scholarship is for a student of any nationality studying for a full-time Masters degree in the School of English.

Application deadline:

31 May 2017

Find out more about the Sussex Future Leaders Masters Scholarship in English

Sussex Graduate Scholarship (2017)

Open to Sussex students who graduate with a first or upper second-class degree and offered a full-time place on a Sussex Masters course in 2017

Application deadline:

1 August 2017

Find out more about the Sussex Graduate Scholarship

Sussex India Scholarships (2017)

Sussex India Scholarships are worth £3,500 and are for overseas fee paying students from India commencing Masters study in September 2017.

Application deadline:

1 August 2017

Find out more about the Sussex India Scholarships

Sussex Malaysia Scholarships (2017)

Sussex Malaysia Scholarships are worth £3,500 and are for overseas fee paying students from Malaysia commencing Masters study in September 2017.

Application deadline:

1 August 2017

Find out more about the Sussex Malaysia Scholarships

Sussex Nigeria Scholarships (2017)

Sussex Nigeria Scholarships are worth £3,500 or £5,000 and are for overseas fee paying students from Nigeria commencing a Masters in September 2017.

Application deadline:

1 August 2017

Find out more about the Sussex Nigeria Scholarships

Sussex Pakistan Scholarships (2017)

Sussex Pakistan Scholarships are worth £3,500 and are for overseas fee paying students from Pakistan commencing Masters study in September 2017.

Application deadline:

1 August 2017

Find out more about the Sussex Pakistan Scholarships

How Masters scholarships make studying more affordable

Living costs

Find out typical living costs for studying at Sussex.


Faculty

Meet the people teaching and supervising on your course.

  • Faculty profiles

    Dr Richard Adelman
    Senior Lecturer
    R.Adelman@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Aestheticism, Critical Theory and Marxism, Dramatic monologue, Eighteenth-century culture, Gothic, Idealist aesthetics, labour, Political economy, Repose, Romanticism, Victorian culture

    View profile

    Dr Sara Jane Bailes
    Reader in Theatre & Performance Studies
    S.J.Bailes@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Theatre and performance studies

    View profile

    Prof Peter Boxall
    Professor of English
    P.Boxall@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Modernist and contemporary writing

    View profile

    Dr Natalia Cecire
    Lecturer in English & American Literature
    N.Cecire@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: American Studies, English and American literature, Feminist theory, History and Philosophy of Science, Modern and contemporary American poetry

    View profile

    Dr Sara Crangle
    Professor
    S.Crangle@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Abjection, Affect Studies, Archives and Editing, Avant-Gardism, Bataille, Bathos, Dada, Everydayness, Experimental Poetry, Futurism, Gertrude Stein, Grace Lake/Anna Mendelssohn, High and Late Modernism, James Joyce, Levinas, Mina Loy, Nietzsche, Phenomenology, Satire, Virginia Woolf, Wyndham Lewis

    View profile

    Dr Sue Currell
    Reader in American Literature
    S.Currell@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: American History, American Studies, Cultural History, English and American literature, Twentieth Century Literature

    View profile

    Dr Alistair Davies

    H.A.Davies@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: English

    View profile

    Dr Denise Decaires Narain
    Senior Lecturer in English
    D.Decaires-Narain@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Caribbean women's writing

    View profile

    Prof Matthew Dimmock
    Professor of Early Modern Studies
    M.Dimmock@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: English literature 1500-1700, History, Islam, Otherness, Prophet Muhammad

    View profile

    Prof Andrew Hadfield
    Professor of English
    A.Hadfield@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Travel writing

    View profile

    Dr Andrea Haslanger
    Lecturer in 18th Century English Literature
    A.Haslanger@sussex.ac.uk

    View profile

    Dr Doug Haynes
    Senior Lecturer in American Literature and Visual Culture
    D.E.Haynes@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Affect Theory, American Modernism, American Visual Art, Critical Theory, Economic Theory, Fictions of Threat, Ideas of pornography, Ideas of security, Marxism, Modern and contemporary American literature, Postmodern Literature, Psychic phenomena as types of literature, Thomas Pynchon

    View profile

    Prof Margaret Healy
    Professor of Literature and Culture
    M.J.Healy@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: medical humanities, Renaissance studies, Shakespeare

    View profile

    Prof Tom Healy
    Professor of Renaissance Studies
    T.F.Healy@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Renaissance studies

    View profile

    Dr Michael Jonik
    Lecturer in English and American Literature
    M.Jonik@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: African American literature and culture, American Philosophy, American Studies, Continental Philosophy, Critical Theory, Critical Theory and Marxism, Deleuze, Early American Literature, Emerson, English and American literature, Foucault, Henry James, History of science, Intellectual History, Melville, Nineteenth-Century American Literature, psychoanalysis, systems theory, Systems Theory; Control, The Transatlantic Enlightenment, Theory of mind, Thoreau

    View profile

    Dr Daniel Kane
    Reader in English & American Literature
    Daniel.Kane@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Modern and contemporary American poetry, Popular Music, US cinema and popular culture

    View profile

    Prof Maria Lauret
    Professor of American Literature and Culture
    M.Lauret@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: 20th C Americanisation in the US, African American literature and culture, Alice Walker, American feminism, American immigrant literature, American immigration, Bharati Mukherjee, Junot Diaz, multilingual literature, Richard Rodriguez

    View profile

    Prof Vicky Lebeau
    Professor of English
    V.A.Lebeau@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: cinema and childhood, image and text, NHS in literature and culture, psychoanalysis

    View profile

    Dr John Masterson
    Lecturer in World Literatures
    J.E.Masterson@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: 20th and 21st Century Literature and Art, African American literature and culture, African diasporas, American immigrant literature, apartheid and post-apartheid South Africa, English and American literature, Literary And Cultural Theory, Literature of Exile, Migrant and Diasporic Literature, Postcolonial Literature, Postcolonial Literature and Culture, Postcolonial Literature and Theory, postcolonial studies, South and Southern Africa, World literatures

    View profile

    Dr William McEvoy
    Senior Lecturer in English
    W.J.Mcevoy@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Contemporary Theatre, Playwriting, Site-specific theatre and performance, Theatre and Ethics, Theory and criticism, Writer-director relationship

    View profile

    Dr Rachel O'Connell
    Lecturer In Post 1350 English Literature
    R.C.O-Connell@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: disability, Gender And Sexuality Studies, Queer studies, Queer Theory

    View profile

    Dr Catherine Packham
    Senior Lecturer in English
    C.M.Packham@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Adam Smith, Eighteenth-century culture, Erasmus Darwin, Gender and Sexuality, History of political economy, History of science, Mary Wollstonecraft, Political economy, Scottish Enlightenment, Vitalism

    View profile

    Dr Chloe Porter
    Lecturer in English Literature
    C.Porter@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Art Theory & Aesthetics, Early modern drama, Early modern material culture, English literature 1500-1700, John Lyly, Materiality, Renaissance studies, Renaissance visual culture, Shakespeare, word and image debates

    View profile

    Dr Jason Price
    Senior Lecturer in Contemporary Theatre and Performance
    J.Price@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Activist Performance, Aesthetics and Politics, Comedy, Contemporary Theatre, Dramaturgy, Marxism, Performance Histories, popular culture, Popular Theatre, Puppet Forms, Site-Specific and Public Art, Theatre and Community

    View profile

    Prof Nicholas Royle
    Professor of English
    N.W.O.Royle@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: English and American literature

    View profile

    Mr Martin Ryle
    Reader in English
    M.H.Ryle@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Modernism in late nineteenth century fiction

    View profile

    Dr Minoli Salgado
    Reader in English
    K.M.Salgado@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Biopolitics, Creative Writing, Human Rights Discourse, Postcolonial Literature and Theory, Salman Rushdie, South Asian Literature in English, Terror and Transnational Writing, Trauma studies

    View profile

    Prof Lindsay Smith
    Professor of English
    L.J.Smith@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Visual perception in the 19th century

    View profile

    Dr Samuel Solomon
    Lecturer in Creative and Critical Writing
    Samuel.Solomon@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Contemporary Poetry, Creative and critical writing, Feminist theory, Gender and Sexuality, Literary And Cultural Theory, Marxism, Modernist and contemporary writing, Print Culture

    View profile

    Dr Bethan Stevens
    Lecturer in English and Creative & Critical Writing
    B.K.Stevens@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Book Illustration, Creative and critical writing, Historical Fiction, Modernism, Museum Studies, popular culture, The History of Printmaking, The Long Nineteenth Century, The Novel, The Short Story, Victorian culture, Word and Image Theory

    View profile

    Prof Keston Sutherland
    Professor of Poetics
    K.Sutherland@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Contemporary Poetry, Critical Theory, Marx, Philosophy, Poetics, psychoanalysis, Romanticism, Samuel Beckett, Wordsworth

    View profile

    Dr Pam Thurschwell
    Senior Lecturer in English
    P.Thurschwell@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: adolescence in literature, English and American literature, Henry James, Literary And Cultural Theory, psychoanalysis, The supernatural (19th/20th century)

    View profile

    Dr Katie Walter
    Senior Lecturer in Medieval English Literature
    K.L.Walter@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Medieval English literature, Medieval literary theory, Medieval medicine, Reading practices, Reginald Pecock, The body, The senses, Vernacular theology, William Langland

    View profile

    Prof Marcus Wood
    Professor of English
    M.M.G.Wood@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Medical, Religious and literary traditions in late medieval England

    View profile

    Dr Tom Wright
    Senior Lecturer in English
    Tom.Wright@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: American History, American Studies, Cultural History, English and American literature, Media & Communication Studies, Multimedia - sound, Nineteenth century literature and culture, Victorian literature

    View profile

Careers

Graduate destinations

93% of students from the School of English were in work or further study six months after graduating. Our students have gone on to jobs including:

  • publications controller, Oxford University Press
  • web content developer, The British Library
  • bookshop manager, Waterstones.

(HESA EPI, Destinations of Post Graduate Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015)

Your future career

Our graduates have gone on to careers in:

  • teaching and education
  • publishing
  • website production and marketing
  • journalism and writing
  • the charity sector
  • NGOs.

A number of our graduates go on to further study and careers in academia.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Contact us