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New arrangements for enforcement of car parking on campus

New arrangements for the enforcement of car parking on campus will come into effect at the beginning of next month.

From Monday 3 April, parking fines will be imposed on drivers whose vehicles are not registered or who have not parked in a marked space.

Drivers who park on double yellow lines, in a disabled bay without the appropriate badge or on hatched areas will receive an immediate fine as they are blocking the way for emergency vehicles and potentially causing serious issues for disabled drivers. Parking on pavements or grassed areas will also result in an immediate fine.

Sussex Estates and Facilities (SEF) and the University of Sussex are working in partnership with First Parking, an approved parking operator that is registered with the British Parking Authority and is permitted to impose fines. First Parking will be able to obtain details of car ownership from the DVLA.

The Director of Residential and Campus Services, Charles Dudley, explains the reasons for the new arrangements: “Although the majority of staff and students who drive to campus register their vehicles and pay to park, an increasing number have not registered their vehicles and are not paying. We also know that drivers who have no connection to the University are parking here. The new enforcement arrangements are directed at those who have been abusing the system.

“Our priority is the safety of all members of the campus community. We have tried to avoid enforcement, but unfortunately we have little option now but to pursue this route. It brings us in line with the majority of universities in the country.”

In order to give drivers who already have permits a reasonable chance of parking on campus, the only permits being issued between now and end of the academic year will be for the Bridge car park - and these may be limited as take-up increases.

All drivers are encouraged to allow enough time to find a parking space before classes or work. This may mean being more flexible in using the campus car parks that are available.

Some of the income from fines will be used to offset administration costs for the scheme. Any surplus will be used for transport-related initiatives and go towards funding of welfare projects for students and staff. 

Alongside the new arrangements for parking enforcement, SEF and the University are working on a series of measures as part of a wider transport strategy. These include liaising with bus and train companies to improve and extend services, participating in the new Brighton bike-share scheme, providing more cycle racks, and using technology to help locate spaces on campus. The University is also centrally engaged in Brighton & Hove City Council’s Travel Plan Partnership

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Posted on behalf of: Transport
Last updated: Monday, 13 March 2017

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Maybe it is time to work out a way for permit holders to pay daily without the hassle, and higher charge of scratch cards.

Those of us who pay monthly have no reason to use a mix of transport, but I'd be happy to use a mix of transport on different days if it was less of a struggle/less time consuming to to do that.

Many of us have a reasons to drive on some days (early starts, late finishes, the need to be somewhere else straight from work etc) but not every day.     

Given the pressure on space, even once the unregistered vehicles are sorted out, maybe that would help.

From Alison Harvey on 13 March 2017
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Close the loophole which allows highly paid contractors and other non-Sussex staff to park at the associate rate of £36 per year, re-introduce pay related parking charges and above all remove the reserved VIP spaces!

From Jack McCulloch on 13 March 2017
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Seems simple to me, just ban people who live a certain distance away from driving in. If you live in Brighton, get the bus, you are not allowed to drive in, or have to pay more to drive in. This is what pretty much every other university in the country does. It'd be greener, open up spaces and solve the issue. Why are people who live a quick bus ride away given the same priority as those who drive fourty minutes and have no bus routes near them?

From Thomas Curthoys-Holmes on 13 March 2017
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Given the increasing pressure on parking, is it now time for staff/post-grads (plus those students with a justifiable need to drive) to finally be given priority over undergraduates?

From Matthew Neale on 16 March 2017
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@Matthew Neale

 

Why should it be only Undergraduates are forced to demonstrate a justifiable need to campus? There are many staff members who live on my road in the town centre of town and drive in too!

 

So I ask; shouldn't *everyone* be made to demonstrate a need - why just undergraduates? Whilst I am an undergraduate, I undertake a part time job to pay for the luxury of a car. I don't need a car, I could get in via. bus but it's quicker, nicer and easier to drive.. esp. when I'm staying till 10pm. Plus I pay for the permit! 

From Toby Walsh on 17 March 2017
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I work p/time for Sussex and this term I teach at 11am. I live in Hollingbury and the 5b bus which goes to campus runs at 9am. If I use that I have to hang around before class then take two long journeys to get home. I also work elsewhere so need to come to campus and then drive to other employment.I welcome the new measures; I have always found places to park legally you need to walk further that's all! so find it galling to see unticketed vehicles left on pavements,verges,hatched areas and evn access footpaths[this week at Sports Centre].

From Geoffrey Mead on 17 March 2017
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The inability to pay for periods longer than 2 hours at machines is ridiculous, also there are a number of cars that have simply been dumped on campus which are using  spaces which could otherwise be used for people with the right to park, I can think of 3 taking up spaces that haven't moved for at least 6 months in addition to the occasional shipping container. 

You could also easily make 4 more spaces in car park 8 by removing the pointless one way system and make the turn at end into spaces. 

From Dominic Richardson on 17 March 2017
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I understand that fines will be focused on those drivers who are parking on double yellow lines, in a disabled bay without an appropriate badge or in hatched areas and that other drivers, such as those who are unregistered, will be given a warning at first and then may be issued with a fine after this.

As the latter is arguably responsible for the former, surely a better approach would be for drivers in both circumstances to be given immediate fines?

From Emma Purnell on 20 March 2017
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Not many places, including other universities, offer reduced-rate (50% discount) parking for students (www.sussex.ac.uk/sef/services/transport/campus-parking/parking-charges). As students can obtain discounted bus travel, I think it would be justified to equalise the charges - especially with regard to SEF's recent questionnaire re. increased parking charges.

Those without a disabilty and who park in spaces reserved for those who need are unthoughtful

From Amanda Vivian Good on 21 March 2017
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"Some of the income from fines will be used to offset administration costs for the scheme. Any surplus will be used for transport-related initiatives and go towards funding of welfare projects for students and staff."

So do they _want_ us to park illegally, to increase their revenue?  Anyway, they won't get any because it, and maybe more, will probably be going to the parking company who aren't doing this for nothing (let's hope they aren't as obnoxious and unpleasant as some of them seem to be), so Sussex and its Students and Staff will not benefit at all.

I wonder what willl happen if we inedvertently park with a wheel on one of the white dividing lines between parking spaces...

From David Stevenson on 21 March 2017
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I am a part time member of staff travelling a reasonable distance to work. Driving is my only option due to childcare responsibilities and I start my working day after 9am. This morning I drove around campus for half an hour and was unable to find a parking space. Rather than go home, I have parked illegally (but safely). However, next month when the new company takes over the issuing of fines, I am not prepared to take the risk and potentially have my details handed over to a debt collection agency. What am I supposed to do? It is an impossible situation made worse by the fact that my charges for parking are taken directly from my wages without the promise of actually providing me with a parking space. I cannot understand why this new company are taking over from April when, by the transport departments own admission, the stress on the car parks due to closure will go on until the summer at least.

From Jessica Hallett on 22 March 2017
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Just reiterating comments about not allowing highly paid contractors and other non-Sussex staff to park at the associate rate of £36 per year, pay related parking charges and at least a significant reduction of reserved VIP spaces. The visitors car park is very underused.

I would also like to come in by car sometimes and bicycle at other times. If the daily rate was pro rata to the montly charge I would be motivated to do this, but currently am not.

Regarding the comments about having to drive 40 minutes, contractually staff members are expected to work within 20 miles unless there are exceptional circumstances - I think.

 

 

 

 

From Sally Talbot on 22 March 2017
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