Dignity and respect

Seeking advice

Who should I talk to?

Where they feel able to, the employee should make clear to the person causing the offence that their behaviour is unacceptable to them, making reference to the policy. In many instances, this can be enough to bring an end to that behaviour.

If the employee themself does not feel able to raise their concerns directly with the person causing the offence, they may wish to seek advice and guidance from another person.

  • This could be their manager or another manager, an HR Business Partner or a Trade Union representative.
  • Alternatively, the University is devloping a network of trained Dignity Champions.
Employee Assistance Programme (EAP)

You can use our Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) partners Care First. Care First are a specialist highly professional organisation that can provide a range of help at difficult times. There is a 24 hour / 365 days-a-year telephone help line that can provide counselling and specialist advice on a range of matters.

In some circumstances, if face-to-face counselling is appropriate this will be arranged with a suitable counsellor that is convenient to you.

You can call the EAP helpline on 0800 015 5630.

What process is followed?

Informally:

Staff are encouraged, where possible, to resolve concerns informally. See Flowchart A.

Where they feel able to, the employee should make clear to the person causing the offence that their behaviour is unacceptable to them, making reference to this Dignity and Respect policy. In many instances, this can be sufficient to bring an end to that behaviour.

The employee should keep behaviour under review and make a note of any incidents of concern.

If the employee themself does not feel able to raise their concerns directly with the person causing the offence, they may wish to seek advice and guidance from another person.

This other person will outline and offer advice on the different ways of dealing with the matter informally, which may include:

  • Further informal discussion with the person causing offence
  • Resolution with the assistance of a third party or formal mediation.

Whilst these people can provide impartial advice and guidance, the employee concerned will be expected to make the decision about which route to follow and take responsibility for progressing with their desired actions.

Where informal action is taken, resolution might take the form of an apology and / or an undertaking by the person causing offence not to repeat the behaviour.

Formally:

If the problem has not been resolved by informal means, or the employee feels it cannot be resolved through informal means, then they may submit a formal complaint.

  • If the complaint relates to another member of staff then this should be submitted as a grievance in line with the University’s Grievance Policy and procedure
  • If the complaint relates to the conduct of a student then this will be taken forward by the University through the Student Disciplinary Regulation [link]. Guidance on reporting allegations of student misconduct can be found in: the Student Disciplinary Procedures and Student Disciplinary Guidance for Staff and Students

Reporting concerns to Police (harassment or potential Hate Crime).Where a victim of harassment considers that their safety is at risk, they are advised to report the matter to the Police. Where an employee other than the victim identifies a breach of this policy which may constitute a criminal offence or an immediate threat to safety, they may report the matter to the Police; alternatively, they may prefer to report the matter to the appropriate line manager who will liaise with the Office of the General Counsel to determine the most appropriate course of action.  Where an individual reports a matter directly to the Police, they are requested to inform the University through the formal internal route set out in this policy, so that appropriate steps can be taken and support provided.