SPRU - Science Policy Research Unit

PhD topics for Colciencias students

Through our courses and supervision of PhD students, SPRU will help train the next generation of policy makers and academics to lead science technology and innovation policy in Colombia.

From 2016, the Government of Colombia’s Department of Science, Technology and Innovation - Colciencias  - is sponsoring a number of Colombian nationals to study at SPRU at doctoral level, subject to satisfying the standard admissions procedures. Please be aware of the English language requirements. 

Application procedure

We have selected relevant supervisors and topics for doctoral research study for Colciencias applicants as detailed below. Prospective students should look at the topics, decide which is of greatest interest, and contact the relevant faculty member by email to discuss your application.

Once agreed by SPRU, please visit our Online postgraduate application system where you will find further information on the application procedure and can submit a formal application for postgraduate PhD study. On receipt of a formal offer students should then apply to Colciencias for funding.

PhD Research topics for students sponsored by Colciencias

Dr Saurabh Arora

From inclusion to empowerment: An investigation into innovative practices to enable favourable ‘terms of inclusion’ for the poor

Taking the emergent research and policy agenda on inclusive innovation as its starting point (Chataway, Hanlin, & Kaplinsky, 2014; Heeks, Foster, & Nugroho, 2014), this proposed research aims to develop a practice-based approach to innovation and investigate how innovative practices can be differently organised to enable favourable ‘terms of inclusion’ for the poor. The proposed research will require empirical and conceptual work, primarily in adapting existing social practice theories (e.g. Maller 2015; Shove, Pantzar, & Watson, 2012; Gherardi, 2006; Schatzki, Knorr-Cetina, & von Savigny, 2001), particularly as they relate to actor-network theory (e.g. Latour, 2005), in order to use them to study innovations in the making. This may require developing an understanding of how practices are variously constituted by: a) actions of and relations between different humans including R&D scientists, engineers, firms, policymakers and (small) farmers; b) a range of other things and beings including plants, animals, laboratory equipment, tools/implements, models, concepts, norms and categories that classify people, lands and knowledge. Conceptual work will also require the development of the notion of ‘terms of inclusion’, in order to go beyond the dichotomous distinction between exclusion and inclusion, for appreciating how (the knowledge and skills of) poor producers and consumers are included in innovation processes. Coupling this conceptual development with empirical work in specific agricultural or energy innovation projects, this research will aim to derive lessons for imagining and realising new possibilities for innovative practices to not only become genuinely inclusive but also durably empowering for the marginalized in society.

Possible co-supervisor: Dr. Tommaso Ciarli

References:
Chataway, J., Hanlin, R., & Kaplinsky, R. (2014). Inclusive innovation: an architecture for policy development. Innovation and Development, 4(1), 33-54. doi: 10.1080/2157930X.2013.876800
Gherardi, S. (2006). Organizational Knowledge: The texture of workplace learning. Oxford: Blackwell.
Heeks, R., Foster, C., & Nugroho, Y. (2014). New models of inclusive innovation for development. Innovation and Development, 4(2), 175-185. doi: 10.1080/2157930X.2014.928982
Latour, B. (2005). Reassembling the Social: An introduction to Actor-Network Theory. Oxford University Press.
Maller, C. J. (2015). Understanding health through social practices: performance and materiality in everyday life. Sociology of Health & Illness, 37, 52–66. doi: 10.1111/1467-9566.12178
Schatzki, T., Knorr-Cetina, K., & von Savigny, E. (Eds.). (2001). The practice turn in contemporary theory. London: Routledge.
Shove, E., Pantzar, M., & Watson, M. (2012). The Dynamics of Social Practice: Everyday Life and how it Changes. London: Sage Publications. .

Innovation at the urban nexus of food, water, energy and the environment in the global south

Led by multilateral institutions, in recent years the interdependence between natural resources implicated in provisioning food, water and energy provision has been framed as the ‘nexus’ (Beck and Walker, 2013; Dodds and Bartram, 2014; Wilsdon and Cairns, 2014). The focal points of this ‘nexus thinking’ are diverse, but issues of resource security and finding technocratic solutions to resource trade-offs are often emphasized (Allouche et al., 2014). The aim of this project is to direct attention to everyday experiences, negotiations and innovative adaptations by/among the vulnerable in Bogota, Medellin or Cali, preferably in a global comparative perspective involving a second city in Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa or South Asia.   

Moving beyond the production of food or energy and its environmental impacts, the nexuses of the urban point to the trade-offs, tensions and (mis)alignments between the practices/infrastructures for provisioning of water, food and energy with each other and with ecological processes. This provisioning is done not only by utility firms and municipal governments but also by households and sometimes by their community organizations and associations. The aim of the proposed research will be to develop the concept of ‘practices of provisioning’, rethink the notion of governance-beyond-the-state from this practice-based perspective and appreciate how mundane and habitual practices (can) relate to each other and change in innovative ways (Stengers 2005; Shove et al. 2012). In addition to doing conceptual/theoretical work on the nexus, this PhD project will entail substantial fieldwork with urban households, municipal (and national) policymakers, civil society organizations and utility firms in the selected cities. It will be linked to a new 3-country, 3-city research project (RESNEXUS) on the urban nexus as an ‘ecology of practices’, which started in October 2015 and is led by Professor Fiona Marshall, Dr. Saurabh Arora and Dr. Ralitsa Hiteva.

Possible co-supervisor: Dr. Ralitsa Hiteva

References:
Allouche, J., Middleton, C. and Gyawali, D. (2014) Nexus Nirvana or Nexus Nullity? A dynamic approach to security and sustainability in the water energy-food nexus, STEPS Working Paper 63, Brighton: STEPS Centre.
Beck, M.B. and Walker, R.V. (2013) On water security, sustainability and the water-food-energy- climate nexus, Front. Environ. Sci. Eng. 7(5): 626-639.
Dodds, F. and Bartram, J. (2014) Building Nexus Principles into the Sustainable Development Goals - Declaration from the Nexus 2014 Energy Conference in the name of the Co- directors, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 5–8 March.
Shove, E., Pantzar, M., & Watson, M. (2012). The Dynamics of Social Practice: Everyday Life and how it Changes. London: Sage Publications
Stengers, I. (2005) Introductory notes on an ecology of practices, Cultural Studies Review 11(1): 183-196.
Wilsdon, J. and Cairns, R. (2014) Navigating the nexus of food, energy, water and the environment, The Guardian, Monday 9 June 

Dr Tommaso Ciarli

Innovation policies, innovation, and economic development under non-favorable institutions: The role of conflict

There is an increasing literature that has studied the effect of economic activity under conflict. Colombia is one of the most studied countries because of the availability of reliable data on conflict, firms, and households (Angrist and Kugler 2008; Mondragón-Vélez and Peña 2010; Bozzoli, Brück and Wald 2013; Dube and Vargas 2013). Some of the studies find that conflict has a negative effect on private economic activity, others find that conflict increases economic activity (Ciarli, Di Maio and Langlotz 2015; Brück, Naudé and Verwimp 2013). Few studies attempt to distinguish which kind of activity increases or decreases, and whether this has a positive or a negative effect on economic development with Ciarli, Kofol and Menon (2015) being an exception.

However, there has been no research done on how violent conflict may affect innovation activities at the micro level. This project should seek to full this void by analysing at the geographical level the interaction between violent conflict and innovation activities at the firm and/or at the household level. The project should use advanced micro econometric tools to identify precisely the effect of conflict on innovation activities. This will provide much needed implication on how innovation policies are affected in development contexts in which institutions are weakened by violent and long term conflict.

The project may also investigate the other direction of causality: how innovative activity influence conflict. Does more innovation attract more looting? Or does it increase the opportunity cost of entering the conflict for the population? Or does innovation reduce employment, therefore reducing the opportunity cot of entering the conflict market? Or both? Which mechanism prevails?

References:

Angrist, J.D., and A.D. Kugler. 2008. “Rural Windfall or a New Resource Curse? Coca, Income, and Civil Conflict in Colombia.” Review of Economics and Statistics 90(2):191–215.
Bozzoli, C., T. Brück, and N. Wald. 2013. “Self-employment and Conflict in Colombia.” Journal of Conflict Resolution 57(1):117–142.
Brück, T., W. Naudé, and P. Verwimp. 2013. “Business under Fire: Entrepreneurship and Violent Conflict in Developing Countries.” Journal of Conflict Resolution 57(1):3–19.
Ciarli, T., C. Kofol, and C. Menon. 2015. “Business as Unusual. An Explanation of the Increase of Private Economic Activity in High-conflict Areas in Afghanistan.” SERC Discussion Paper No. 182,
Ciarli, T., M. Di Maio, and S. Langlotz. 2015. “A Difficult Relationship: Conflict and Entrepreneurship.” Working Paper No. mimeo,
Dube, O., and J.F. Vargas. 2013. “Commodity Price Shocks and Civil Conflict: Evidence from Colombia.” The Review of Economic Studies 80(4):1384–1421.
Hausmann, R., and C. Hidalgo. 2011. “The network structure of economic output.” Journal of Economic Growth 16(4):309–342.Hidalgo, C.A., B. Klinger, A.-L. Barabási, and R. Hausmann. 2007. “The Product Space Conditions the Development of Nations.” Science 317(5837):482–487.
Mondragón-Vélez, C., and X. Peña. 2010. “Business Ownership and Self-Employment in Developing Economies: The Colombian Case.” In J. Lerner and A. Schoar, eds. International Differences in …. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, pp. 89 – 127.
Neffke, F., M. Hartog, R. Boschma, and M. Henning. 2014. “Agents of structural change. The role of firms and entrepreneurs in regional diversification.” Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography No. 14/10, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography. 

Technological change and structural change

An increasing number of studies have convincingly shown that economic development is related to structural changes in the economy, from a specialisation into low value added ‘simple’ goods to high value added ‘complex’ goods (Hidalgo et al. 2007; Hausmann and Hidalgo 2011). However, this literature does not study how this change across sectors occurs; whether it is driven by innovation policies, human capital, entrepreneurship, technology transfer, access to markets, etc. Or to a combination of them.

This projects seeks to investigate the micro economic mechanisms of structural change, using micro plant data, innovation surveys, and local specific variables that reflect industrial and complementary policies. This can be seen in the line of what Neffke et al. (2014) have done in studying the diversification of regions. Particulalry useful will be the use of micro data that link workers and firms across their life cycle. And matching these data with innovation data.

One more question that can be asked in this project, which needs to use both qualitative and quantitative methods, is how inclusive are those structural changes. Structural transformation are belived to accompany ecomomic development, but who is displaced? What is the price of displacement? How are the gains of innovation and structural change distributed in the population?

References:

Angrist, J.D., and A.D. Kugler. 2008. “Rural Windfall or a New Resource Curse? Coca, Income, and Civil Conflict in Colombia.” Review of Economics and Statistics 90(2):191–215.
Bozzoli, C., T. Brück, and N. Wald. 2013. “Self-employment and Conflict in Colombia.” Journal of Conflict Resolution 57(1):117–142.
Brück, T., W. Naudé, and P. Verwimp. 2013. “Business under Fire: Entrepreneurship and Violent Conflict in Developing Countries.” Journal of Conflict Resolution 57(1):3–19.
Ciarli, T., C. Kofol, and C. Menon. 2015. “Business as Unusual. An Explanation of the Increase of Private Economic Activity in High-conflict Areas in Afghanistan.” SERC Discussion Paper No. 182,
Ciarli, T., M. Di Maio, and S. Langlotz. 2015. “A Difficult Relationship: Conflict and Entrepreneurship.” Working Paper No. mimeo,
Dube, O., and J.F. Vargas. 2013. “Commodity Price Shocks and Civil Conflict: Evidence from Colombia.” The Review of Economic Studies 80(4):1384–1421.
Hausmann, R., and C. Hidalgo. 2011. “The network structure of economic output.” Journal of Economic Growth 16(4):309–342.Hidalgo, C.A., B. Klinger, A.-L. Barabási, and R. Hausmann. 2007. “The Product Space Conditions the Development of Nations.” Science 317(5837):482–487.
Mondragón-Vélez, C., and X. Peña. 2010. “Business Ownership and Self-Employment in Developing Economies: The Colombian Case.” In J. Lerner and A. Schoar, eds. International Differences in …. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, pp. 89 – 127.
Neffke, F., M. Hartog, R. Boschma, and M. Henning. 2014. “Agents of structural change. The role of firms and entrepreneurs in regional diversification.” Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography No. 14/10, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography. 

Dr Mari Martiskainen

Social innovation in the energy system

This proposal is focused on social innovation within the energy system, interested in concept such as citizen-led energy action. The research could focus especially on looking at the type of social innovations that have developed in Colombia in relation to its energy system, what has motivated such initiatives, what have been their outcomes and whether they have influence on wider energy policy. The research could focus either on demand or supply, or both. 

References:
Broto, V.C., 2012. Social housing and low carbon transitions in Ljubljana, Slovenia. Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions 2, 82-97.
Dahlander, L., Frederiksen, L., 2012. The core and cosmopolitans: A relational view of innovation in user communities. Organ. Sci. 23, 988-1007.
Grimm, R., Fox, C., Baines, S., Albertson, K., 2013. Social innovation, an answer to contemporary societal challenges? Locating the concept in theory and practice. Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research 26, 436-455.
Seyfang, G., Smith, A., 2007. Grassroots innovations for sustainable development: Towards a new research and policy agenda. Environmental Politics 16, 584-603.

Transition to low carbon residential buildings

This research will focus on the innovation of energy efficiency of residential buildings in Colombia. Colombia’s has committed to promoting and supporting energy efficiency projects in the residential sector. The project would seek to analyse what the status of innovation in the residential sector is, and what challenges and opportunities there are in relation to Colombia’s wider energy policy objectives. 

References:
Broto, V.C., 2012. Social housing and low carbon transitions in Ljubljana, Slovenia. Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions 2, 82-97.
Dahlander, L., Frederiksen, L., 2012. The core and cosmopolitans: A relational view of innovation in user communities. Organ. Sci. 23, 988-1007.
Grimm, R., Fox, C., Baines, S., Albertson, K., 2013. Social innovation, an answer to contemporary societal challenges? Locating the concept in theory and practice. Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research 26, 436-455.
Seyfang, G., Smith, A., 2007. Grassroots innovations for sustainable development: Towards a new research and policy agenda. Environmental Politics 16, 584-603.

Politics of grassroots innovations

Grassroots innovations have been conceptualised as civil society led networks and initiatives that aim to address the sustainability of food, energy and transport. Initiatives such as community energy projects, community gardens, food networks and car sharing clubs for example provide thriving spaces for sustainable consumption, and new technological and social innovations. These initiatives are often driven by social good, rather than by pure monetary motives. Much of previous research in grassroots innovations has focused largely on conceptualizing such initiatives, and analysing their development as well as potential for replication and diffusion; there has been less research in the politics involved in these initiatives. I would be interested in supervising a PhD project which looks at the politics of grassroots innovations and how they link to political engagement.

References:
Broto, V.C., 2012. Social housing and low carbon transitions in Ljubljana, Slovenia. Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions 2, 82-97.
Dahlander, L., Frederiksen, L., 2012. The core and cosmopolitans: A relational view of innovation in user communities. Organ. Sci. 23, 988-1007.
Grimm, R., Fox, C., Baines, S., Albertson, K., 2013. Social innovation, an answer to contemporary societal challenges? Locating the concept in theory and practice. Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research 26, 436-455.
Seyfang, G., Smith, A., 2007. Grassroots innovations for sustainable development: Towards a new research and policy agenda. Environmental Politics 16, 584-603.

Dr Ralitsa Hiteva

Social innovation, energy policy, cities in innovation and science, technology and innovation policy

Post 2008, developed and developing economies alike saw the expansion of poverty and the reduction of social and public services. The economic crisis and its associated austerity regime have prompted citizens to seek out alternative ways of service provision and consumption in cities, often relying on locally-based innovative practices that question the logics of centralized systems predicated upon large-scale carbon circulations (Huber, 2013). This in turn has seen the expansion of 'innovation democracy' (Stirling 2014) and opening up of spaces for social innovations with a relatively low potential for commercial benefits. These involve innovative bottom-up economic and social activities (such as barter and volunteering), new household practices and diverse collective and solidarity actions, often of informal character and varying levels of expertise.

Such activities open up new possibilities for understanding how multiple overlapping trajectories of socio-economic and techno-political change contribute to low-carbon transitions (Bridge et al. 2013) in cities. Many city and regional authorities have been aiming to move towards low-carbon patterns of urban development, in response to the broader systemic challenges posed by climate change and energy security. “Smart” cities are produced through centralised, high-tech and top-down approaches to transitioning towards low carbon living via the use of standards, integrated information packages and control systems.

Interesting research questions include:

  • How urban low carbon transitions are mobilized through social innovation and innovation democracy at varies scales: households, communities, neighbourhoods etc.?
  • How can diverse bottom-up innovation be theorised in relation to low-carbon transitions?

Dr Matias Ramirez

Inclusion in emerging agricultural clusters

This project focuses specifically on the development of the innovation capabilities of a range of small producers that have been hitherto marginalized from innovation processes. I have undertaken past projects that specifically look at emerging clusters in agricultural sectors in Colombia and Chile, where improving capabilities of small producers is essential both for the local economy and more generally for the productive sector. Critical theoretical issues that arise include the role of collective action (and collective goods) in inclusion, the structural properties of networks in clusters and how these influence knowledge transfer and intermediation of extension services.

References:
Clarke, I and Ramirez, M. (2014), (2013) Intermediaries and capability building in 'emerging clusters'. Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, 32, (4) pp. 714-730
Ramirez, M. Bernal, P. Clarke, I. and Hernandez I., (2014), Distinguishing patterns of learning and inclusion through the dynamics of network formation in developing agricultural clusters, SPRU working paper series No.20, University of Sussex.
McDermott G, Corredoira R, Kruse G, (2009), “Public–private institutions as catalysts of upgrading in emerging market societies” Academy of Management Journal, 52, pp. 1270–1296.
Fafchamps, M., (2007), Development and social capital, Journal of Development Studies, Vo. 42, No7, p1180- 1198.

Regional innovation and development

Regional policy for innovation and building regional innovation systems is vastly challenging for lower income countries because of the need to cater for the vast contrasts between urban and rural capabilities, differences in human resources and levels of education (Altenberg and Meyer-Stammer 1999). This PhD project will acknowledge the importance of physical space for agglomeration and can draw upon the rich work in amongst other areas including evolutionary economic geography (Boschma and Frenken, 2009). However, the often localised nature of interactions, the importance of access to export markets and the role of local intermediaries will play a critical role.

References:
Altenburg T and Meyer-Stamer J (1999), How to promote cluster: Policy experiences from Latin America, World Development, 27, 1693- -1713.
Boschma R and Frenken K (2009), Some notes on institutions in evolutionary economic geography, Urban and Regional Research Centre 82, 2. 151-158. 1996

Social networks and transitions

Systemic innovation and transitions necessary involves fundamental changes in the structures of social networks. This can be expressed by the appearance of new coalitions of central actors, the appearance of dynamic subcliques that undermine the established order, or niches that move from the margins to the centre. This project will examine the dynamics of these transitions through changes in the make-up and mix of social networks. It will examine the hypothesis that transition is driven by heterogeneity of networks.

References:
Granovetter, M (1973), the strength of weak ties, American Journal of Sociology, 78 (6), 1360-1380.
Burt, R. L., (1992), Structural Holes, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Walker, G. Kogut, B. and ShanSource, W., (1997). Social capital, structural holes and the formation of an industry network, Organization Science, Vol. 8, No. 2 pp. 109-125.

Prof Benjamin Sovacool

Energy access, inclusion and innovation

Access to sustainable energy raises key questions for our understanding of innovation, especially at smaller household and community scales. These include the degree to which a community can be an active participant and gain ownership of the process of innovation, which is partly linked to the development of new capabilities in areas of environmental and socially sustainable projects of energy access. However, access to sustainable energy also raises questions of central actors (large energy firms, universities, state) and how they develop solutions to the specific problems of marginalised communities through programmes such as open science.   This project would identify best and worst practices for energy access programs in the Latin America and Caribbean region, with a special focus on rural Columbian communities wishing to expand their access to (1) the national grid, (2) community micro and mini-grids, and-or (3) off-grid isolated systems such as solar lanterns or biogas digesters.  The idea would be to identify and avoid obstacles and capture and maximize benefits.

References:
Sovacool, BK. “Design Principles for Renewable Energy Programs in Developing Countries,” Energy & Environmental Science 5(11) (November, 2012), pp. 9157-9162. 
Sovacool, BK. “Deploying Off-Grid Technology to Eradicate Energy Poverty,” Science 338 (October 5, 2012), pp. 47-48. 
International Energy Agency, United Nations Development Programme, United Nations Industrial Development Organization, 2010. Energy Poverty: How to Make Modern Energy Access Universal? Paris: OECD.
Practical Action, Poor People’s Energy Outlook 2010 (Rugby, UK: Practical Action Publishing), pp. v-vi and 1-36. 
Modi, V., S. McDade, D. Lallement, and J. Saghir, Energy Services for the Millennium Development Goals (Washington and New York: The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/The World Bank and the United Nations Development Programme, 2005).
United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean and UNDP, Contribution of Energy Services to the Millennium Development Goals and to Poverty Alleviation in Latin America and the Caribbean (2009).

Dr Puay Tang

The evaluative use of indicators

The way in which indicators are being used in the evaluation of research and innovation has been changing. The increased availability of data and data analysis tools has led to concepts like data-led evaluation and the spread of “formula-based” approaches to decision-making, the proliferation of all kinds of rankings, and the belief that “key performance indicators” can provide a shortcut to the difficulties inherent in allocating resources to research and innovation. These trends are however very problematic. Dissertations will be welcomed that address the ways in which indicators are used in evaluation in different contexts, the problems that such use generates and the possible avenues to develop more robust ways to use data to inform science and innovation policies.

The governance of research management and evaluation

The increased capacity to collect, store and analyse datasets on the performance of teaching and academic activities is leading to a profound change in the way in which universities and research funding and performing organisations are managing their activities, and consequently on the governance of research. Managers are intervening more closely in decisions related to the allocations of research and teaching resources, and they are using datasets, research management systems and analytical tools that are increasingly being provided by a small number of private suppliers. These tools become an important element in the de facto definition and implementation of research policies, although they are built outside the scientific communities who used to self-govern and self-regulate their activities. Dissertations can explore the ways in which these changes are emerging in specific regional and national contexts and their implications for the nature of academic activities and their social role.

Prof Johan Schot

Transforming the Colombian energy sector through a Digital Revolution

The project would examine the role of information and communication technologies (ICT) in transforming organisational practices and business models in the energy sector to contribute to realising a low carbon transition. Drawing on insights from past ‘great surges of development’ led by technological revolutions, it has been suggested that green technologies could provide a direction for the widespread deployment of the ICT-based surge (Perez, 2013). Drawing on historical insights, qualitative analysis and empirical research, this project will examine the potential for such a convergence of ICT and green technologies in the energy sector in Colombia and Latin America more widely, the barriers to this and how they might be overcome in such a way that this deployment contributes to economic, social and environmental aims. Possible areas for analysis could include the development of smart grids for electricity distribution and use. It is claimed that smart grids could enable energy networks to manage embedded renewable energy suppliers, communicate between the producers and users of electricity, utilise ICT to respond to and manage demand, and ensure safe and secure electricity distribution, but challenges remain in relation to value creation and which actors will benefit from this (Hall and Foxon, 2014). This research will explore alternative socio-technological scenarios for the deployment of smart grids and related technologies, focussing on roles of actors, including distribution network operators, ICT companies, municipal authorities and regulators, and new business models and institutional changes that may be needed to realise alternative pathways.

References:
Foxon, T J (2013), ‘Transition pathways for a UK low carbon electricity future’, Energy Policy 52, pp. 10-24.
Hall, S and Foxon, T J (2014), ‘Values in the Smart Grid: the co-evolving political economy of smart distribution’, Energy Policy 74, pp. 600-609.
Perez, C (2013), ‘Unleashing a golden age after the financial collapse: Drawing lessons from history’, Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions 6, pp. 9-23.

Prof Adrian Smith

The grassroots appropriation of digital fabrication technologies for social purposes

In terms of analytical orientations, this work is drawing upon Science and Technology Studies, socio-technical transformations, social movements research, material cultures, and critical urban studies.

Hackerspaces, makerspaces and FabLabs – roles (potential and actual) in social development

In terms of analytical orientations, this work is drawing upon Science and Technology Studies, socio-technical transformations, social movements research, material cultures, and critical urban studies.

The knowledge politics of smart urbanism: contrasting top-down ‘smart city’ initiatives with the development of smart technologies by citizens in urban neighbourhoods

In terms of analytical orientations, this work is drawing upon Science and Technology Studies, socio-technical transformations, social movements research, material cultures, and critical urban studies.