Department of Social Work and Social Care

Adult social care

Self-neglect practice: a study of adults social care policies and practices to support beneficial outcomes in self-neglect

Funder

Department of Health

Period of research

April - December 2013

This project explores what constitutes good practice in working with self-neglect.

Until recently, there has generally been little guidance on how to deal with self-neglect issues and specificDepartment of Health logo data on prevalence or outcomes are rarely collated. Using a survey of local authorities and interviews with managers, professionals and service users, this project aims to identify what seems to have been effective in self-neglect cases and what can be learnt from these experiences.

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Practice enquiry into supervision in a variety of adult care settings where health and social care practitioners work together

Funder

Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE)

Period of research

May 2013

Principal Investigators

Sharon Lambley & Dr Tish Marrable

 

This practice enquiry was commissioned to form part of the knowledge base for a practice guide for supervision in adult services where both health and social care personnel work.

The enquiry explored the delivery of supervision across a range of joint and integrated team settings within adult care, uncovering the types of supervision in use and their perceived outcomes for stakeholders. The purpose of the research was to seek examples of supervision which stakeholders viewed as 'goodSCIE logo practice' and, in doing so, explored the factors that made supervision effective for workers, those who use the services, and organisations.

Download the final report: Putting effective supervision into practice: Supervision and service inspection

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Scoping the issues around self-neglect in social care and allied health and welfare adult services

Funder

Skills for Care

Period of research

January 2013 - April 2013

Self-neglect in adults is a complex and varied issue. In England, as in many other countries, there is as yet no widespread or definitive approach to workforce development to assist in addressing the difficulties of practice with self-neglect.

This study explored the extent of need and justification for such an undertaking by reviewing evidence from the research literature, relevant serious case reviews and interviews carried out at five localities across the country.

The findings added to what is already known about the challenges of self-neglect practice, and identified key workforce development issues to be Skills for Care logoaddressed. They also identified examples of ways forward already in progress, and pointed to key priorities for the sector skills council, Skills for Care.

Download the final report:
Braye, S., Orr, D. and Preston-Shoot, M. (2013): A Scoping Study of Workforce Development for Self-Neglect. London: Skills for Care.

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The governance of adult safeguarding / Self-neglect and adult safeguarding

Funder

Department of Health

Period of research

December 2009 - May 2010

This project investigated what constitutes effective governance in Safeguarding Adults Boards. It gathered data from a systematic literature review, five workshops with senior managers and safeguarding specialists, five key informant interviews, and detailed documentation from 47 Boards.

Download the final reports: 

See also:Department of Health logo

  • Braye, S., Orr, D. and Preston-Shoot, M. (2012): 'The governance of adult safeguarding: findings from research', in The Journal of Adult Protection, 14(2), pp 55-72
  • Braye, S., Orr, D. and Preston-Shoot, M. (2011): 'Conceptualising and responding to self-neglect: the challenges for adult safeguarding', in The Journal of Adult Protection, 13(4), pp 182-193

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* banner image provided courtesy of the Newhaven Community Development Association (NCDA)