School of Psychology

Psychology

(BSc) Psychology

Entry for 2010

FHEQ level

This course is set at Level 6 in the national Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

Course Aims

In the Psychology (BSc) degree programme we aim to:1. meet the accreditation requirements of the British Psychological Society for undergraduate programmes, to permit entry to professional training or research;2. provide students with a firm grasp of the main theories, methods and findings of psychological research relevant to an understanding of the relationship between the brain and behaviour;3. incorporate a wide range of teaching methods to broaden the range of learning experience offered;4. offer a flexible and responsive admissions policy, offering access to students with special needs, and particularly to students in the local area who, while intellectually qualified to take a full-time degree programme, have an unconventional academic background;5. prepare students for future employment or training by providing them with opportunities to develop a range of personal, practical and intellectual skills;6. encourage students to realise their potential in an environment that offers opportunities for learning and an integrated system of pastoral care;7. enable students to participate in processes of course review and evaluation;8. provide opportunities for students to develop analytical, critical evaluation and problem-solving skills for assessing psychological issues and evaluating research findings;9. provide opportunities for students to develop progressively advanced research skills, including formulation of research questions, study design, data collection, selection and performance of statistical analyses and evaluation of findings;10. provide opportunities for students to develop an understanding of how the brain modulates behaviour and contributes to conscious experience and of the experimental techniques used to study the relationship between the brain and behaviour.

A. Knowledge and Understanding

By the end of the programme, successful students who have attended regularly and completed required work will: -A1. Be able to demonstrate an understanding of the scientific underpinnings of psychology as a discipline. [BM]A2. Be able to demonstrate an understanding of the inherent variability and diversity of psychological functioning. [BM]A3. Be able to demonstrate a good knowledge and critical understanding of a range of influences on psychological functioning and how they are conceptualised across the core areas of biological psychology, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, personality, and social psychology. [BM]A4. Be able to demonstrate knowledge of a number of specialised areas and/or applications. [BM]A5. Be able to demonstrate knowledge of a range of research paradigms, research methods and measurement techniques, including statistical analysis. [BM] A6. Be able to demonstrate an understanding of how the brain modulates behaviour and contributes to conscious experience A7. Be able to show some understanding of ethical issues relating to research in psychology.

Assessment

Students' knowledge and understanding is assessed through a mixture of unseen examinations (A1-A6) and course work (A1 - A7).

Teaching and Learning Methods Used to Enable Outcomes to Be Achieved and Demonstrated

A1-A7 from lectures, tutorials, and practical classes in all years, together with the feedback to students on their coursework and the guided independent study required to participate in the course activities. A7 particularly from lectures and coursework in the second year research methods course and from discussions with their supervisor during their final year project.

B. Intellectual Skills

By the end of the programme, successful students who have attended regularly and completed required work will: -B1. Be able to reason scientifically and demonstrate the relationship between theory and evidence. [BM]B2. Be able to adopt multiple perspectives. [BM]B3. Be able to detect meaningful patterns in behaviour and experience. [BM]B4. Be able to pose and operationalise research questions. [BM]B5. Be able to reason statistically and demonstrate competence in a range of statistical methods. [BM]B6. Be able to initiate, design, conduct, and report an empirically-based research project under appropriate supervision. [BM]B7. Be able to show an awareness of ethical principles and demonstrate this in relation to personal study, particularly with regard to the research project.B8. Be able to critically evaluate the primary literature in particular areas of Psychology.B9 Recognise the need to assess their own skills and to harness them for future learning. [BM]

Assessment

Students' intellectual skills are assessed through a mixture of unseen examinations (B1- B3, B8), coursework (B1-B3, B8, B9) and practical and project work (B4-B9).

Teaching and Learning Methods Used

B1 to B3 from lectures and tutorials in all years together with the feedback to students on their coursework and the guided independent study required to participate in the course activities. B4 to B7 from research methods classes in the first and second years, in which the students have to run, analyse and write up experiments.B4 to B9 from the final year project.B8 from lectures and any associated tutorials/seminars in the final year, together with the independent study required.B9 through discussion of tutorial reports with tutors; through receiving feedback on coursework.

C. Practical Skills

By the end of the programme, successful students who have attended regularly and completed required work will: -C1. Be able to demonstrate competence in research skills through practical activities. [BM]C2. Be able to carry out basic manipulation of data, including statistical analyses [BM] C3. Be able to manage time effectively and pursue personally set objectives.

Assessment

Practical skills are assessed by practical write-ups and unseen examinations on the Research Methods courses in years one and two, and also by the write up of the final year project.

Teaching and Learning Methods Used

Participation in practical classes, statistics examples classes, and lectures in years one and two, and personal supervision on the final year project.

D. Transferable Skills

By the end of the programme, successful students who have attended regularly and completed required work will: -D1. Be able to communicate ideas and research findings by written, oral, and visual means. [BM]D2. Be able to interpret and use numerical, statistical and other forms of data. [BM]D3. Be able to demonstrate computer literacy, at least in the use of word processing, databases, statistical software, [BM] and obtaining information from WWW.D4. Be able to approach problem solving in a systematic way. [BM]D5. Be able to demonstrate awareness of contextual and interpersonal factors in groups and teams [BM] and has developed the interpersonal skills that will allow them to participate in co-operative group planning and decision making.D6. Be able to undertake self-directed study and project management in a supportive environment [BM] and be able to plan, execute and present an independent piece of work within such an environment.D7. Recognise the need to assess their own skills and to harness them for future learning. [BM]D8. Be able to reflect on and be critical of their own workD9. Recognise the applicability of Psychology to the careers to which they will be progressing.

Assessment

Students' transferable skills are assessed through a mixture of unseen exams, essays and other coursework including presentations, and practical and project work

Teaching and Learning Methods Used

D1 through tutorials and seminars, which require informal contributions to discussion as well as, in many courses in all years, formal presentations; through preparing coursework and receiving feedback on it; and through writing a project and receiving feedback on the project write-up, and giving a formal presentation on the project. In addition, in the first year there is specific writing skills training.D2 through the lectures, examples classes and practical classes of the Research Methods courses in years one and two, and through personal supervision on the final year project.D3 from participation in a specific computer skills training in year one, and the use of these skills in subsequent courses. It is expected that work submitted for assessment will be word-processed. The WWW is increasingly used in the delivery of information about courses and supplementary information for courses. Much of the communication between course and personal tutors and students is via e-mail. Using statistical packages is part of the Research Methods courses in years one and two and of the final year project.D4 through preparing coursework in all years and receiving feedback that constantly emphasizes the need to rigorously organize one's strategy in dealing with the problem set by the essay title; through supervision on tackling the particular problem addressed in the final year project.D5 through teamwork in the Research Methods course in year two, where groups of students must isolate an interesting problem, and then design, prepare and conduct an experiment to tackle it, all as a group.D6 through final year project work.D7 and D8 through discussion of tutorial reports with tutors; through receiving feedback on coursework.D9 through discussion with personal tutor and project supervisor; participation in events organized by the CDU.

Course learning outcomes

Be able to demonstrate a good knowledge and critical understanding of the core area of biological psychology

Be able to demonstrate a good knowledge and critical understanding of the core area of cognitive psychology

Be able to demonstrate a good knowledge and critical understanding of the core area of developmental psychology

Be able to demonstrate a good knowledge and critical understanding of the core area of social psychology

Be able to demonstrate a good knowledge and critical understanding of the core area of individual differences.

Be able demonstrate knowledge of a range of research measurement techniques including statistical analysis

Be able to demonstrate competence in research skills through practical activities

Be able to demonstrate computer literacy, especially with statistical software and word processing

Be able to carry out data entry and manipulation and conduct inferential tests for simple and complex factorial designs.

Be able to use multivariate methods and qualitative analysis.

Be able to demonstrate an understanding of the scientific underpinnings of psychology and what it means to be a science

Be able to demonstrate knowledge of a number of specialised areas and or applications of psychology

Be able to analyse data to answer a coherent set of original questions

Be able to make independent decisions about data presentation and analysis, and to expand independently ones knowledge of statistics beyond what one has been taught

Be able to show understanding of ethical issues relating to research in psychology

Be able to reason scientifically and statistically, appreciating the relationship between theory and evidence

Be able to initiate, design, conduct, and report on an empirically-based research project under appropriate supervision

Recognise the need to assess ones own skills and to harness them for future learning

Be able to demonstrate awareness of contextual and interpersonal factors in groups and teams, and to develop the interpersonal skills that will allow effective participation in co-operative group planning and decision making

Be able to critically assess ones own and others work so as to improve it

Be able to approach problem solving in a systematic way

Be able to communicate ideas and research findings by written, oral, and visual means

Full-time course composition

YearTermStatusModuleCreditsFHEQ level
1Autumn TermCoreCognition in Clinical Contexts (C8508)124
  CorePsychology of Childhood and Adolescence (C8813)124
 Spring TermCoreIndividuals and Groups (C8510)124
  CorePsychobiology (C8003)124
 Summer TermMandatory for progressCognitive Psychology I (for Year 1) (C8520)125
 Undergraduate Academic YearMandatory for progressResearch Skills in Psychology (C8511)304
YearTermStatusModuleCreditsFHEQ level
2Autumn TermCoreBrain and Behaviour (C8518)125
  CoreCognitive Psychology II (C8519)125
 Spring TermCoreDevelopmental Psychology (C8546)125
  CoreSocial Psychology (C8035)125
 Summer TermCorePersonality and Individual Differences (C8034)125
 Undergraduate Academic YearMandatory for progressResearch Methods in Psychology (C8057)305
YearTermStatusModuleCreditsFHEQ level
3Autumn TeachingCoreThe Philosophy of Psychology (C8840)156
  OptionAltruism and Helping: the psychology of caring about and for others (C8014)156
  Biological Bases of Mental Disorders (C8504)156
  Cognitive Neuroscience (C8517)156
  Drugs, Brain and Behaviour (C8528)156
  Fear and Anxiety in Children (C8821)156
  Gestural Communication in Apes and Human Infants (C8018)156
  Neurobiological Mechanisms of Learning and Memory (C8601)156
  Psychology of Collective Action (C8817)156
  Psychology of the Family: Beyond Attachment (C8549)156
  Reading, Writing and Dyslexia (C8013)156
  Social Cognitive Development (C8045)156
  The Social Psychology of Prejudice (C8822)156
 Autumn & Spring TeachingCoreEmpirical Project (C8824)456
 Spring TeachingOptionAnimal Vocal Communication (C8600)156
  Clinical Psychology (C8002)156
  Dynamic Approach to Understanding Child Development (C8100)156
  Economic and Consumer Psychology (C8021)156
  Human Vocal Communication (C8829)156
  Organisational Psychology (C8041)156
  Positive Psychology (C8892)156
  Psychobiology of Cognitive Ageing and Dementia (C8833)156
  Psychological Perspectives on Self and Identity (C8027)156
  Psychology in Education (C8042)156
  Psychology of Appetite (C8839)156
  Sensory and Motor Functions of the Nervous System (C8835)156

Part-time course composition

YearTermStatusModuleCreditsFHEQ level
3Autumn TeachingCoreThe Philosophy of Psychology (C8840)156
  OptionAltruism and Helping: the psychology of caring about and for others (C8014)156
  Biological Bases of Mental Disorders (C8504)156
  Cognitive Neuroscience (C8517)156
  Drugs, Brain and Behaviour (C8528)156
  Fear and Anxiety in Children (C8821)156
  Gestural Communication in Apes and Human Infants (C8018)156
  Neurobiological Mechanisms of Learning and Memory (C8601)156
  Psychology of Collective Action (C8817)156
  Psychology of the Family: Beyond Attachment (C8549)156
  Reading, Writing and Dyslexia (C8013)156
  Social Cognitive Development (C8045)156
  The Social Psychology of Prejudice (C8822)156
 Spring TeachingOptionAnimal Vocal Communication (C8600)156
  Clinical Psychology (C8002)156
  Dynamic Approach to Understanding Child Development (C8100)156
  Economic and Consumer Psychology (C8021)156
  Human Vocal Communication (C8829)156
  Organisational Psychology (C8041)156
  Psychobiology of Cognitive Ageing and Dementia (C8833)156
  Psychological Perspectives on Self and Identity (C8027)156
  Psychology in Education (C8042)156
  Psychology of Appetite (C8839)156
  Receptors and Senses (C1130)156
  Sensory and Motor Functions of the Nervous System (C8835)156
YearTermStatusModuleCreditsFHEQ level
4Autumn & Spring TeachingCoreEmpirical Project (C8824)456

Please note that the University will use all reasonable endeavours to deliver courses and modules in accordance with the descriptions set out here. However, the University keeps its courses and modules under review with the aim of enhancing quality. Some changes may therefore be made to the form or content of courses or modules shown as part of the normal process of curriculum management.

The University reserves the right to make changes to the contents or methods of delivery of, or to discontinue, merge or combine modules, if such action is reasonably considered necessary by the University. If there are not sufficient student numbers to make a module viable, the University reserves the right to cancel such a module. If the University withdraws or discontinues a module, it will use its reasonable endeavours to provide a suitable alternative module.