Research

I am especially intrigued by 'home': everyday home making practices and lived domestic space, the relation between housing and home, and the entanglement of our home lives with relatedness, intimacy, personal life, and heteronormativity.

Running through my work is a concern with the mobilities and materialities through which home is lived and imagined in everyday life. Methodologically I am most engaged with in depth ethnographic approaches to home, especially domestic material culture and repeat interviewing.

I am currently engaged with the following research projects:

1. Post-divorce/separation family life: families who have adopted shared-care, lone-parent or co-parenting arrangements, and children's experiences of having more than one home, are inadequately reflected in popular culture and obscured by heternormative policy narratives. With colleagues at Sussex and Brighton, I am developing research to understand the everyday family life of such families. 

2. British return migrants in later life: in an ongoing project, I am collecting life-stories from British returnees, focusing on narratives of home, belonging, ageing and the life-course. This project pays particular attention to the temporalities of domesticity, exploring the way in which people's sense of belonging aged 65+ is shaped by their experiences of diaspora and using material culture analysis and participatory visual methods. 

3. GCC migration. My doctoral research explored British migrant identities in Dubai (ESRC funded, 2001-2005) and in a postdoctoral project (RGS Small Research Grant 2006) I extended this focus to the wider GCC region.