University of Sussex shows staunch support for social mobility

Data released today (Tuesday 6 September) by the Office for Fair Access (OFFA) shows that the University of Sussex is one of the most committed higher education providers to social mobility in the UK.

Sussex has an exceptional track record of attracting students from backgrounds without a history of higher education and of helping them to reach their potential.

All students benefit from the University’s outstanding schemes into graduate-level employment and the most recent data show that 90 per cent of 2015 graduates who had qualified for the University’s First Generation Scholars scheme are now in graduate-level employment or further study.

Compared to the 119 other multi-faculty institutions in the UK, Sussex is ranked fifth for the percentage of additional fee income it has committed to spend on improving access for under-represented social demographic groups in 2017/18.

The University is positioned second only to Oxford for the South East region as a whole.

Sussex will spend 40 per cent of additional fee income on widening participation activities - up from 33 per cent in the previous agreement.

Vice-Chancellor Adam Tickell commented: “Providing an even playing field, and ensuring as wide as possible access to education, lies at the very heart of Sussex. It’s something our whole community cares about passionately.

“Although critically important, it’s not just about the amount of money we set aside, it’s the quality of the programmes and support we offer to talented students from disadvantaged backgrounds that really makes the difference.”

The University invests in social mobility through a range of engagement activities to help school children become more familiar with university life, a financial bursary and support programme (First Generation Scholars) for students from under-represented groups. Approximately 50 per cent of students at Sussex qualify for this scheme.


Posted on behalf of: University of Sussex
Last updated: Tuesday, 6 September 2016

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