School of Law, Politics and Sociology

International Trade Law

(LLM) International Trade Law

Entry for 2011

FHEQ level

This course is set at Level 7 (Masters) in the national Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

Course Aims

The LLM in International Trade Law aims to provide students with critical insights into both public and private aspects of international trade regulation. It therefore covers the rules and institutions of international and some regional organisations governing trading conduct and States, alongside the rules that regulate private transactions between individuals and businesses of different countries. The core courses of the programme aim to provide understanding of the institutional framework for international trade law and a critical awareness of the theoretical underpinnings of research into the international trading system. Students are then able to pursue their interests in international trade in a variety of different contexts offered by specific options in the Spring Term.

A. Knowledge and Understanding

A1: the nature and context of international, regional and comparative trade law;
A2: the establishment and functioning of major institutions of international and European trade law;
A3: the development, content and elements of a range of international and European trade practices;
A4: the history and development of the legal systems governing the World Trade Organisation, the relevant aspects of the EU legal system and such aspects of the municipal legal systems as fall within the optional courses selected;
A5: principles and theory of research methodology in international and comparative trade law.

Assessment

The unseen examination, essays and the dissertation

Teaching and Learning Methods Used to Enable Outcomes to Be Achieved and Demonstrated

Lectures will be utilised, where appropriate, for introductory material and for topics requiring more directed learning. Teaching and learning will be primarily by way of seminars. This method of teaching requires students to develop their own learning through guided seminar questions and student-led presentations.

B. Intellectual Skills

B1: reflect critically upon the meanings, purposes and ideologies of international, regional and comparative trade law;
B2: evaluate and make judgements in an informed way;
B3: identify problems and solutions;
B4: understand, apply and develop theoretical and practical concepts;
B5: synthesise information;
B6: reflect on their own development.

Assessment

The unseen examination, essays and the dissertation

Teaching and Learning Methods Used

Seminars

C. Practical Skills

C1: identify a suitable topic for research and undertake research on that topic;
C2: use and process information, including effective use of ICT as well as traditional resources;
C3: prepare and deliver of presentations;
C4: use techniques for effective presentation of critical analysis, both written and oral;
C5: develop appropriate career pathways.

Teaching and Learning Methods Used

Presentation of papers in seminars and essays.

D. Transferable Skills

D1: to construct logical and well supported arguments and communicate these effectively in writing and in speech;
D2: to use ICT to aid research (data-bases, information retrieval, including internet communication) and to present essays or research findings (use of word-processing, spread sheets, etc);
D3: to work with others, showing strong interpersonal skills and the capacity to share common goals;
D4: to improve their own learning and performance, including the development of research and study skills and information retrieval, and the ability to reflect on their own learning.

Assessment

The unseen examination, essays and the dissertation

Teaching and Learning Methods Used

Primarily through seminars.

Course Outline (May Be Used in Prospectus)

This programme is intended to introduce students to the subject of regional and international trade law in its broadest sense. As well as issues relating to commerce and finance under international law and the law of regional groupings, especially the European Union (EU), this programme will include an examination of the complexities of dispute resolution within international economic organisations especially the World Trade Organisation. Building upon knowledge learned in the first term, students will have the opportunity in their elective subjects to examine topics in more depth. These might include the international and comparative dimensions of company law, of corporate insolvency law and of intellectual property; in addition students may specialise in particular trade-related aspects of the law of the EU and the relationship of that jurisdiction to the international jurisdiction and to the jurisdictions of the EU's Member States.

Course learning outcomes

Describe and critically analyse the fundamental principles, practices and institutions of international trade law

Reflect critically upon the meanings, purposes and ideologies of international trade law

Critically evaluate a range of subjects specific to the optional courses chosen on the programme

Understand and make use of a variety of research methodologies in international trade law

Understand a variety of theoretical perspectives which underpin international trade law

Undertake a substantial research project

Full-time course composition

YearTermStatusModuleCreditsFHEQ level
1Autumn and Spring TermsMandatory for progressInternational Trade: Issues and Challenges (878M3)307
 Autumn TermMandatory for progressAdvanced Research for LLM Students (902M3)67
  The Legal Regulation of International Trade (870M3)307
 Spring TermComplex/Misc RuleAspects of Intellectual Property Law (821M3)307
  Comparative Criminal Justice Systems (832M3)307
  EU Competition Law (829M3)307
  EU Single Market Law (828M3)307
  International and Comparative Company Law (819M3)307
  International and Comparative Corporate Insolvency Law (818M3)307
  International and Transnational Offending (803M3)307
  International Crimes (801M3)307
  International Environmental Law (875M3)307
  Law and Citizenship in the European Union (967M9)307
  Law of International Business Transactions (892M3)307
  Migration under the European Convention on Human Rights (871M3)307
  The International Legal Regulation of Armed Force (861M3)307
  Women and Human Rights (873M3)307

Part-time course composition

YearTermStatusModuleCreditsFHEQ level
1Autumn and Spring TermsMandatory for progressInternational Trade: Issues and Challenges (878M3)307
 Autumn TermMandatory for progressAdvanced Research for LLM Students (902M3)67
 Spring TermComplex/Misc RuleAspects of Intellectual Property Law (821M3)307
  Comparative Criminal Justice Systems (832M3)307
  EU Competition Law (829M3)307
  EU Single Market Law (828M3)307
  International and Comparative Company Law (819M3)307
  International and Comparative Corporate Insolvency Law (818M3)307
  International and Transnational Offending (803M3)307
  International Crimes (801M3)307
  International Environmental Law (875M3)307
  Law and Citizenship in the European Union (967M9)307
  Law of International Business Transactions (892M3)307
  Migration under the European Convention on Human Rights (871M3)307
  The International Legal Regulation of Armed Force (861M3)307
  Women and Human Rights (873M3)307
YearTermStatusModuleCreditsFHEQ level
2Autumn TeachingCoreThe Legal Regulation of International Trade (870M3)307
 Autumn & Spring TeachingCoreDissertation (International Trade Law) (827M3)457

Please note that the University will use all reasonable endeavours to deliver courses and modules in accordance with the descriptions set out here. However, the University keeps its courses and modules under review with the aim of enhancing quality. Some changes may therefore be made to the form or content of courses or modules shown as part of the normal process of curriculum management.

The University reserves the right to make changes to the contents or methods of delivery of, or to discontinue, merge or combine modules, if such action is reasonably considered necessary by the University. If there are not sufficient student numbers to make a module viable, the University reserves the right to cancel such a module. If the University withdraws or discontinues a module, it will use its reasonable endeavours to provide a suitable alternative module.