School of Global Studies

International Relations and Development Studies

(BA) International Relations and Development Studies

Entry for 2009

FHEQ level

This course is set at Level 6 in the national Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

Course Aims

The programme will:
1. Enable students to understand the importance of International Relations in the contemporary world.
2. Ensure that students acquire knowledge and understanding in appropriate areas of theory and analysis.
3. Enable students to understand and use the concepts, approaches and methods of the discipline and develop an understanding of the contested nature and problematic character of inquiry in the discipline.
4. Provide students with the opportunity to combine the insights and methods of the discipline.
5. Develop students' capacities to critically analyse events, ideas, institutions and practices.
6. Provide students with opportunities to develop their intellectual, personal and interpersonal skills so as to enable them to participate meaningfully in their societies.
7. Provide a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that promotes breadth and depth of intellectual enquiry and debate.
8. Provide students with a supportive and receptive learning environment.
9. Develop the intellectual and practical skills of students in the analysis, interpretation and understanding of inter-related aspects of the societies, cultures, economics and politics of less developed and developing regions of the world.
10. Explore the important issues, such as race, the environment, gender relations and socio-economic development.
11. Encourage students to understand the importance of Development Studies in the contemporary world.
12. Encourage students to engage in life-long learning, study and enquiry and to appreciate the value of education for society.

Course Learning Outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

A. Knowledge and Understanding

Undergraduates should achieve a basic but rigorous grounding in International Relations. This means graduates will be able to:
A1. Understand the core concepts and questions which define the discipline of IR and the area of development studies;
A2. Demonstrate awareness of the major practical, political and moral challenges facing contemporary global society;
A3. Demonstrate familiarity with the key theoretical traditions of IR as an academic discipline and the major theoretical debates in development and cross-cultural studies;
A4. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the history of modern international relations;
A5. Understand the significance of the world economy for the nature of the international system.
A6. Demonstrate flexibility in utilising a variety of intellectual approaches as required by the multifaceted character of the subject of International Relations and the area of Development Studies.
A7. Show an understanding of the ethical issues involved in developmental and cross-cultural research and analysis.
A8. Demonstrate in-depth knowledge and understanding of a specialist area within the discipline.

Assessment

A range of assessment modes will be employed:
1. Unseen examinations, which will test students ability to respond concisely to questions within a time-bound context.
2. Essays, including coursework essays, which allow the student to define intellectual problems which they can address though papers of varying length.
3. Dissertations which allow student to define intellectual problems and address these through extended research and written work.

Teaching and Learning Methods Used to Enable Outcomes to Be Achieved and Demonstrated

A range of teaching modes will be employed as appropriate to each stage of the programme:
1. Lectures, which will be used to relay a broad range of information.
2. Seminars, which will be based on groups of students allowing them to advance intellectually through discussion and making presentations.
3. Workshops, which require students to engage cooperatively to resolve problems and present them to the wider group communally.
4. Individual supervision, which will be used especially to provide students with guidance in researching and writing their dissertations.

B. Intellectual Skills

Graduates in the programme will be able to:
B1. Read effectively and take meaningful notes.
B2. Apply a range of skills in the retrieval and use of primary and secondary sources including basic statistical and numerical information.
B3. Present concise, critical and cogently structured argument, both orally and in writing.
B4. Reflect upon and take responsibility for their own learning, making use of constructive feedback.
B5. Work independently.

Assessment

A range of assessment modes will be employed:
1. Unseen examinations, which will test students ability to respond concisely to questions within a time-bound context.
2. Essays, including coursework essays, which allow the student to define intellectual problems which they can address though papers of varying length.
3. Dissertations which allow student to define intellectual problems and address these through extended research and written work.
The diverse modes of assessment help to ensure the acquisition of these varying intellectual skills.

Teaching and Learning Methods Used

A range of teaching modes will be employed as appropriate to each stage of the programme:
1. Lectures, which will be used to relay a broad range of information.
2. Seminars, which will be based on groups of students allowing them to advance intellectually through discussion and making presentations.
3. Workshops, which require students to engage cooperatively to resolve problems and present them to the wider group communally.
4. Individual supervision, which will be used especially to provide students with guidance in researching and writing their dissertations.
The diverse modes of teaching and learning help to ensure the acquisition of these varying intellectual skills.

C. Practical Skills

Graduates in the programme will be able to:
C1. Deploy a range of communication and information technology skills.
C2. Communicate effectively with others both orally and in writing.
C3. Co-operate with others to achieve common goals.
C4. Meet deadlines under pressure.

Assessment

A range of assessment modes will be employed:
1. Unseen examinations, which will test students ability to respond concisely to questions within a time-bound context.
2. Essays, including coursework essays, which allow the student to define intellectual problems which they can address though papers of varying length.
3. Dissertations which allow student to define intellectual problems and address these through extended research and written work.
The diverse modes of assessment help to ensure the acquisition of these varying practical skills.

Teaching and Learning Methods Used

A range of teaching modes will be employed as appropriate to each stage of the programme:
1. Lectures, which will be used to relay a broad range of information.
2. Seminars, which will be based on groups of students allowing them to advance intellectually through discussion and making presentations.
3. Workshops, which require students to engage cooperatively to resolve problems and present them to the wider group communally.
4. Individual supervision, which will be used especially to provide students with guidance in researching and writing their dissertations.
The diverse modes of teaching and learning help to ensure the acquisition of these varying practical skills.

D. Transferable Skills

D1. Problem solving skills.
D2. Time management skills.
D3. Presentational skills.
D4. Ability to presentation information in a range of modes.

Assessment

A range of assessment modes will be employed:
1. Unseen examinations, which will test students ability to respond concisely to questions within a time-bound context.
2. Essays, including coursework essays, which allow the student to define intellectual problems which they can address though papers of varying length.
3. Dissertations which allow student to define intellectual problems and address these through extended research and written work.
The diverse modes of assessment help to ensure the acquisition of these varying transferable skills.

Teaching and Learning Methods Used

A range of teaching modes will be employed as appropriate to each stage of the programme:
1. Lectures, which will be used to relay a broad range of information.
2. Seminars, which will be based on groups of students allowing them to advance intellectually through discussion and making presentations.
3. Workshops, which require students to engage cooperatively to resolve problems and present them to the wider group communally.
4. Individual supervision, which will be used especially to provide students with guidance in researching and writing their dissertations.
The diverse modes of teaching and learning help to ensure the acquisition of these varying transferable skills.

Course learning outcomes

An understanding of the core concepts and questions that define the discipline of IR.

A familiarity with the key theoretical traditions of IR as an academic discipline.

A basic knowledge of the history of modern international relations.

An understanding of the significance of the world economy for the nature of the international system.

An understanding of theoretical debates in international development and their relevance for contemporary development practice.

An understanding of the historical, economic, social, environmental and cultural aspects of development.

A knowledge of practical and research skills in international development and the ability to apply these.

An understanding of key contemporary issues in international development.

The ability to carry out a sustained independent research project in international development.

An understanding of key development concepts.

Ability to communicate effectively with others and to present material both orally and in writing.

Ability to deploy a range of communication and information technology skills.

Ability to present concise and cogently structured arguments, both orally and in writing.

Ability to carry out critical analysis on complex issues related to the discipline.

Full-time course composition

YearTermStatusModuleCreditsFHEQ level
1Autumn TermCoreColonialism and After (L2003)124
  CoreIntroduction to International Relations (L2008)124
  CoreThe Rise of the Modern International Order (L2007)124
  CoreUnderstanding Global Cultures (L2001)124
 Spring and Summer TermsCoreIssues in Development (AF002)184
  CoreRace, Ethnicity and Nationalism (L2002)184
  CoreThe International System Today: Regions and Institutions (L2009)184
  CoreThe Short Twentieth Century and Beyond (L2005)184
YearTermStatusModuleCreditsFHEQ level
2Autumn TermCoreClassical Political Theory & International Relations (L2014)125
  CoreCulture and Development (L2101)125
  CoreInternational Political Economy I (L2024)125
  CoreThe Political Economy of Development (L2100)125
 Spring and Summer Terms2 of these optionsEnvironmental Perspectives on Development (L2103)185
  Gender and Development: Theory, Concepts and Issues (L2104)185
  Health and Development (L2102)185
  Introduction to Development Economics (L2105)185
  Social Change and Development (L2107)185
  CoreContemporary International Theory (L2015)185
  CoreInternational Political Economy II (L2025)185
YearTermStatusModuleCreditsFHEQ level
3Autumn Term1 of these optionsCapitalism and Geopolitics (L2062)306
  Development and Geopolitics in East Asia (L2074A)306
  Environment and Development in World Politics (L2073A)306
  International Security since 9/11 (L2056A)306
  Peace Processes in Global Order (L2059A)306
  1 from this groupInstitutions of Aid (major, joint) (L2115)306
  Tools of the Trade (major, joint) (L2116)306
 Spring Term1 of these optionsEast Central Europe since 1945 (M1519S)306
  Finance and Power in a Global Age (L2069S)306
  International Relations of the Modern Middle East (L2065S)306
  Law in International Relations (M1532S)306
  NGOs in World Politics (L2067S)306
  Religions in Global Politics (L2075S)306
  What is War (L2072S)306
  1 from this groupContemporary Issues in the Global Political Economy (M1529S)306
  Environment, Ecology and Development (L2123S)306
  Human Rights (L2124S)306
  International Relations of the Modern Middle East (L2065S)306
  Medicines, Health and Development (L2125S)306
  NGOs in World Politics (L2067S)306
  Population and Development (L2126S)306

International Relations and Development

Please note that the University will use all reasonable endeavours to deliver courses and modules in accordance with the descriptions set out here. However, the University keeps its courses and modules under review with the aim of enhancing quality. Some changes may therefore be made to the form or content of courses or modules shown as part of the normal process of curriculum management.

The University reserves the right to make changes to the contents or methods of delivery of, or to discontinue, merge or combine modules, if such action is reasonably considered necessary by the University. If there are not sufficient student numbers to make a module viable, the University reserves the right to cancel such a module. If the University withdraws or discontinues a module, it will use its reasonable endeavours to provide a suitable alternative module.