Broadcast: News items

New Werner Herzog-linked Netflix documentary to get special campus screening

Professor Anil Seth features as one of nine world-renowned experts sharing ideas in a new Vice Media documentary.

A globe-trotting film bringing together leading scientists in a bid to uncover answers to some of humanity’s biggest questions will be screened on campus.

A special screening of The Most Unknown will be held at the Attenborough Centre for the Creative Arts on Tuesday 13 November from 8pm as part of Brighton’s Cine City film festival, with tickets priced at just £5 and £3 concessions.

The screening will be followed by a panel discussion with three scientists featured in the film:

  • Anil Seth (Informatics 1995), Professor of Cognitive and Computational Neuroscience, University of Sussex and Co-Director, Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science
  • Axel Cleeremans, Professor of Cognitive Psychology at the Université Libre de Bruxelles
  • and Davide D’Angelo, Assistant Professor of Physics at the University of Milan

The Vice Media documentary, produced in cooperation with renowned film director Werner Herzog, sends nine scientists to extraordinary parts of the world to uncover unexpected answers to some of humanity’s biggest questions including how life began, and what is time, and how consciousness happens.

It has received glowing reviews, with the New Yorker calling it “gorgeous”, while the New York Times described it as
“mystifying - extols the wonders of science and of all that’s yet to discover”.

Sussex alumnus and academic Professor Seth, who has spent the past two decades on ground-breaking research trying to unravel the mystery of consciousness, said: “When I first heard about The Most Unknown I thought it was a bit crazy, but when I understood what they were trying to do I was thrilled to be involved. Having the chance to discuss our work with other scientists from very different fields was challenging and rewarding, and certainly led me to think about my own research in new ways.

"The strangest part was being filmed continuously for days at a time - and of course a lot of the footage never made the final cut. My favourite experience was climbing all over the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico, learning about the search for extraterrestrial life.”


By: Tom Furnival-Adams
Last updated: Thursday, 8 November 2018

Share: